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Thread started 10/03/17 8:50pm

LOVESYMBOLNUMB
ER2

Dhani Harrison on Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne & that Prince gratuitous guitar moment

I don't know how to link a YouTube video, but I just watched the 2004 rock and roll hall of fame performance again, and am literally brought to tears every time I see it. And the smile on Dhani's face reacting to prince was always so touching to me...now I hear he said prince's performance was gratuitous...what???...he was not impressed and said he was smiling because it was so awkward...I am so disappointed by this...if you search the title of this topic on YouTube the interview will come up
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Reply #1 posted 10/03/17 9:02pm

heymistermusic

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Reply #2 posted 10/03/17 9:17pm

coldasice

Well in all actuality Prince was showboating during a tribute.
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Reply #3 posted 10/03/17 9:36pm

TrivialPursuit

coldasice said:

Well in all actuality Prince was showboating during a tribute.


He was told to let loose.

"Despite everything, no 1 can dictate who u r 2 other people." - Prince |
http://bit.ly/unboxingprince
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Reply #4 posted 10/03/17 10:11pm

thebanishedone

princes solo was mind blowinbg and what Dhani knows about guitar playing anywat? he was on stage because og who his dad was,not because he knows how to play

pathetic wanker

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Reply #5 posted 10/04/17 1:16am

Yewdale

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TrivialPursuit said:

coldasice said:

Well in all actuality Prince was showboating during a tribute.


He was told to let loose.


Do you have a link to any credible source that backs up your assertion that Prince was told to let loose during this tribute performance? If so, it might help me climb down from the fence I've been sitting on for all these years when it comes to this clip.


I've been a Beatles nut since I was 11 years old, and a Prince fan since I was 13..... and this year I turned 48, so both of these artists have been with me throughout my teenage and adult life. Being such a huge fan of both artists, I've always been left feeling a little unsure of my thoughts on the tribute.

On the one side, if you isolate Prince's solo (and even the strutting peacock exit) it is indeed something special to see. On the other side, the star of a tribute performance is usually the person who is being honoured, and I feel most artists both respect and display that in their performance, which is usually in keeping with the style of the person being honoured, with the intention of shining a light on the work of the honouree, rather than a... 'hey, come and look at ME play' showboating kind of performance that showed little in the way of reverence or tribute to George Harrison himself.

I thought Prince's playing itself was spectacular in that it was showy and somewhat OTT, but I never felt it fitted in with the rest of the performance, which was a very real and heartfelt tribute to someone other than Prince. While it might seem as if I'm anything but sitting on the fence, and that I'm criticising Prince, there is another side to my feelings.... namely, what would one expect from Prince when asking him to perform? Prince was never one for hiding his light under a bushell when he was on stage, and if you've invited him to walk on-stage mid song and solo, you were really only ever going to get one result. Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne could both have playd a version of the original Eric Clapton solo in their sleep, so why invite Prince to join in? What did Dhani, Jeff and Tom think Prince was going to do with those few minutes on stage?

To me it's always been a confusing watch, and a case of strange bedfellows.


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Reply #6 posted 10/04/17 1:38am

dodger

Yewdale said:

TrivialPursuit said:


He was told to let loose.


Do you have a link to any credible source that backs up your assertion that Prince was told to let loose during this tribute performance? If so, it might help me climb down from the fence I've been sitting on for all these years when it comes to this clip.


I've been a Beatles nut since I was 11 years old, and a Prince fan since I was 13..... and this year I turned 48, so both of these artists have been with me throughout my teenage and adult life. Being such a huge fan of both artists, I've always been left feeling a little unsure of my thoughts on the tribute.

On the one side, if you isolate Prince's solo (and even the strutting peacock exit) it is indeed something special to see. On the other side, the star of a tribute performance is usually the person who is being honoured, and I feel most artists both respect and display that in their performance, which is usually in keeping with the style of the person being honoured, with the intention of shining a light on the work of the honouree, rather than a... 'hey, come and look at ME play' showboating kind of performance that showed little in the way of reverence or tribute to George Harrison himself.

I thought Prince's playing itself was spectacular in that it was showy and somewhat OTT, but I never felt it fitted in with the rest of the performance, which was a very real and heartfelt tribute to someone other than Prince. While it might seem as if I'm anything but sitting on the fence, and that I'm criticising Prince, there is another side to my feelings.... namely, what would one expect from Prince when asking him to perform? Prince was never one for hiding his light under a bushell when he was on stage, and if you've invited him to walk on-stage mid song and solo, you were really only ever going to get one result. Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne could both have playd a version of the original Eric Clapton solo in their sleep, so why invite Prince to join in? What did Dhani, Jeff and Tom think Prince was going to do with those few minutes on stage?

To me it's always been a confusing watch, and a case of strange bedfellows.


Exactly, this is what I was thinking. What did they expect Prince to do, just stand still and play his part conservatively.

And I'm sure Dhani was heard at the end excitedly saying 'where's Prince?'

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Reply #7 posted 10/04/17 2:37am

bonatoc

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That's total bullshit, the product of the deformation of these times.

If you cut the fucking video, something we just got addicted to like crazy in the last few years,
it came from the guts. Until Prince comes in, it's just your regular homage, well executed,
but the melancholy of it is kinda bland, on the verge of boring.

When Prince starts his chant on the axe, it becomes a big spiritual "thank you" to George Harrison.
The fact that it is technicaly impressive is secondary, but most people don't get it.

It's been always the problem with Prince: there is just so much talent after talent after mastery,
that it gets rebuffed, it unnerves, especially to (so-called) musicians.
Here's a guy whose work was constanstly screaming at others in the business: "you lazy punks",
even if this too was a byproduct and the original intention.
While they were sipping cocktails in Monterey or Montserrat, taking a year for making an "album",

and taking three between each release, how could it be different?

Prince smiling and making faces is the usual "I can't believe what's coming out of my fingers".
And the poses, the falling down? These ol'timers, this young ignorant that is Dani,
they forgot what Rock'n'Roll is all about, they just became nine-to-fivers of the show-business.
Prince gives you the Elvis attitude.
No wonder Petty stood up and defended Prince, he knew (and asked Prince for it).
The bravado, and the danger: this was not rehearsed, and barely sound-checked.

Does his solo sound like "OK guys, this is very fine and dandy, but what about waking up?"
Absolutely.
Does it make it a show-off? No. It's just the stark contrast between the solo and everything that went before.
Suddenly, the song becomes a rocket taking off from Cape Canaveral, and an ode to a rocker (therefore it rocks).
Again, listen to it without the video.




[Edited 10/4/17 3:05am]

Africa, Cap'n Crunch, Norma Jean, Sex and Cheerio's
Play my record double speed, feel the climax fit 4 a king
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Reply #8 posted 10/04/17 2:38am

bonatoc

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Africa, Cap'n Crunch, Norma Jean, Sex and Cheerio's
Play my record double speed, feel the climax fit 4 a king
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Reply #9 posted 10/04/17 2:43am

JorisE73

thebanishedone said:

princes solo was mind blowinbg and what Dhani knows about guitar playing anywat? he was on stage because og who his dad was,not because he knows how to play

pathetic wanker


I have the original broadcast version of the show on DVD somewhere, and at the end of it there's a little thing from backstage after the performance where Dhani is all excited and is asking some interviewer where Prince is because he wants to give him a big hug.

So it seems Dhani is just being an idiot now.

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Reply #10 posted 10/04/17 2:54am

controversy99

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Yewdale said:



TrivialPursuit said:




coldasice said:


Well in all actuality Prince was showboating during a tribute.


He was told to let loose.




Do you have a link to any credible source that backs up your assertion that Prince was told to let loose during this tribute performance? If so, it might help me climb down from the fence I've been sitting on for all these years when it comes to this clip.



I've been a Beatles nut since I was 11 years old, and a Prince fan since I was 13..... and this year I turned 48, so both of these artists have been with me throughout my teenage and adult life. Being such a huge fan of both artists, I've always been left feeling a little unsure of my thoughts on the tribute.

On the one side, if you isolate Prince's solo (and even the strutting peacock exit) it is indeed something special to see. On the other side, the star of a tribute performance is usually the person who is being honoured, and I feel most artists both respect and display that in their performance, which is usually in keeping with the style of the person being honoured, with the intention of shining a light on the work of the honouree, rather than a... 'hey, come and look at ME play' showboating kind of performance that showed little in the way of reverence or tribute to George Harrison himself.

I thought Prince's playing itself was spectacular in that it was showy and somewhat OTT, but I never felt it fitted in with the rest of the performance, which was a very real and heartfelt tribute to someone other than Prince. While it might seem as if I'm anything but sitting on the fence, and that I'm criticising Prince, there is another side to my feelings.... namely, what would one expect from Prince when asking him to perform? Prince was never one for hiding his light under a bushell when he was on stage, and if you've invited him to walk on-stage mid song and solo, you were really only ever going to get one result. Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne could both have playd a version of the original Eric Clapton solo in their sleep, so why invite Prince to join in? What did Dhani, Jeff and Tom think Prince was going to do with those few minutes on stage?

To me it's always been a confusing watch, and a case of strange bedfellows.



Apparently Tom Petty is the one who told Prince to cut loose. Many are mourning this week his recent loss. Here's a quote from Tom's drummer, from a NY Times article where they interviewed some of the people who are on stage:
.

FERRONE Tom sort of went over to him and said, “Just cut loose and don’t feel sort of inhibited to copy anything that we have, just play your thing, just have a good time.”
.
https://mobile.nytimes.co...-fame.html
.
I love the solo, but I also thought at the time that it might've been a bit gratuitous. Having read the reactions of the other people on stage, I'm now very comfortable that it was a great and appropriate performance.
.
Btw, Dhani's comments aren't entirely negative. They're more mixed and whimsical. He says "it was definitely a moment to be shared with the whole human race" and it was "a classic."
.
It's interesting that Dhani was concerned about what Tom Petty was thinking. Then Petty himself praised the guitar solo in that NY Times article, which quotes Petty several times.
"Love & honesty, peace & harmony"
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Reply #11 posted 10/04/17 2:57am

bonatoc

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JorisE73 said:

thebanishedone said:

princes solo was mind blowinbg and what Dhani knows about guitar playing anywat? he was on stage because og who his dad was,not because he knows how to play

pathetic wanker


I have the original broadcast version of the show on DVD somewhere, and at the end of it there's a little thing from backstage after the performance where Dhani is all excited and is asking some interviewer where Prince is because he wants to give him a big hug.

So it seems Dhani is just being an idiot now.


I'd rather say he lacks character (but think about how it must be to grow up in the shadows of a giant).
Someone afterwards must have told him: "Look at him, he's clearly showing off", and he bought it.
Again, it's easy to be mistaken given all the circumstances.
But my guess is that to Prince, it was just another jam.

Yes, there is definetely this attitude "bout time I come in, we were all falling asleep",
but who can blame him? Jeff Lyne whines, session musicians are doing their jobs...
And then it becomes a mass for George.
And even the musicians start to play better, try stuff (the Hammond strokes),
and if you're a musician you sure can tell how much Prince plays WITH the band,
how much his solo is an interplay that couldn't happen without a strong, focused
connection to what is played underneath.

Prince expresses himself, and it sounds fabulous, definitive.
Classic reaction of the crowd: "Hang him! Hang him!"

Africa, Cap'n Crunch, Norma Jean, Sex and Cheerio's
Play my record double speed, feel the climax fit 4 a king
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Reply #12 posted 10/04/17 3:03am

bonatoc

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It's noon in France.
Every first wednesday of the month, they test the public alarm horns systems,
and they blast out in every neighborhood in the country for a whole minute.
Sirens just rised while Prince entered. What are the odds? wink

So if by chance you happen to be in France at noon on a first wednesday,
don't be alarmed: this is either a test, or 1999.

Africa, Cap'n Crunch, Norma Jean, Sex and Cheerio's
Play my record double speed, feel the climax fit 4 a king
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Reply #13 posted 10/04/17 3:28am

bonatoc

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And look, Dhani.
It' not that hard to get that Prince is simulating death, when he falls over.
It's not (just) show-off. It's show.
Pardon me: Show, with a super-capital.

The bodyguard pushes him back to erection, and he rises from the dead.
"Music is stronger that death.
Your father is fine."
That's what Prince was conveying, and his smiles and smirks are just pure joy from a pure soul like SKipper's.

You can overcome death with a smile. Christopher at work again.
The Blue Angel sang the same in The Hague (of all places!) decades ago already, damn,
but how many are in the know? And he had the night, not a handful of seconds.


That God may have spoken through Prince's fingers,
I'll leave that to zealots, or nutcase zealots in disguise as myself.

Now try to walk in Prince's high-heeled shoo.
How could not these lyrics resonate to Prince,
given his childhood and his personal path at this point in his life (and moreover, sung just seconds before he steps in)?

I don't know how you were diverted
You were perverted too
I don't know how you were inverted
No one alerted you



Now Dhani, we all forgive you but, on the moment, you don't get it, you're all high from what's coming out of the speakers and this small,
elegant, impeccable Charlie Chaplin who is in the mood for a celebration, yet knows this is a tribute to your father.
When Prince does Lazarus, there you are laughing like, yes, an idiot (in the Iggy Pop/Bowie sense, but still).

Now look at Tom, who just stares at Prince's hands, and shakes his head in disbelief.
Look at how elegant Prince is when he asks MC Tom if he's doing some more
(and it would have finished it on the spot had Tom raised his axe for Las Vegas).
Look at the genuine smiles from Petty after that. He shares the emotion.
They all do at this point, even the Young Dhude who condradicts himself.

And Prince articulates "Love is Stronger Than Death" like an adult musician, the sadness of it all,
the wrath of Adam against God for the inescapable disappearance He casts upon him.

I mean at 5'14'' and following, Prince is the Good General, saying to the world (pick yours):
"It's music that don't make me age, can't you see it?" (in a modest, Chaplinesque way),
"Here's an armaggeddon, we're going to avenge music tonight",
"Here's to you George Harrison" (the pointed finger at the sky),
"fellow musicians, there's someone in the crowd who totally gets it, let's play for her.him".
And that is precisely the point.

With Prince, you can play that Boy or Girl every time, with every song.
46 million views, eh?
Good horse, Trojan, be good now.

[Edited 10/4/17 3:51am]

Africa, Cap'n Crunch, Norma Jean, Sex and Cheerio's
Play my record double speed, feel the climax fit 4 a king
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Reply #14 posted 10/04/17 4:12am

pdiddy2011

Dhani certainly has a right to his opinion, but this just sounds like sour grapes.

There are over 46,000,000 views of the Hall of Fame performance and about 35,000 comments not even acknowledging anyone was on stage (in a very positive way) except for Prince because his performance was transcendent.

Every other version of this song (even those by George and Eric Clapton) is now compared to the Hall of Fame Induction version and many people (for the past 13 years) only reference Prince's performance (positively) when it is mentioned. His dad's live version of the song (with Eric Clapton) doesn't have 1/3 as many views, and it certainly isn't a performance heralded as spectacular.

Dhani was worried about what Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne were thinking, therefore he was smiling? Really? I suppose so, but I hope Dhani plays a lot of poker, because he has the most genuine "awkward" smile I've ever seen.

I also recall Dhani completely in awe and excitedly looking for Prince after the performance as well.


I get the feeling Dhani is a bit annoyed for probably being asked "What was it like to be apart of this glorious time in Prince history?" for 14 years ad nauseum, even though the performance was supposed to be about his dad's legacy.

[Edited 10/4/17 4:13am]

[Edited 10/4/17 4:15am]

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Reply #15 posted 10/04/17 4:32am

bonatoc

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pdiddy2011 said:

I get the feeling Dhani is a bit annoyed for probably being asked "What was it like to be apart of this glorious time in Prince history?" for 14 years ad nauseum, even though the performance was supposed to be about his dad's legacy.


Maybe he's saying in a subtle English humoured manner: "your question is gratuitous".
In which case he's far from being an idiot.


[Edited 10/4/17 4:33am]

Africa, Cap'n Crunch, Norma Jean, Sex and Cheerio's
Play my record double speed, feel the climax fit 4 a king
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Reply #16 posted 10/04/17 4:41am

thebanishedone

Yewdale said:

TrivialPursuit said:


He was told to let loose.


Do you have a link to any credible source that backs up your assertion that Prince was told to let loose during this tribute performance? If so, it might help me climb down from the fence I've been sitting on for all these years when it comes to this clip.


I've been a Beatles nut since I was 11 years old, and a Prince fan since I was 13..... and this year I turned 48, so both of these artists have been with me throughout my teenage and adult life. Being such a huge fan of both artists, I've always been left feeling a little unsure of my thoughts on the tribute.

On the one side, if you isolate Prince's solo (and even the strutting peacock exit) it is indeed something special to see. On the other side, the star of a tribute performance is usually the person who is being honoured, and I feel most artists both respect and display that in their performance, which is usually in keeping with the style of the person being honoured, with the intention of shining a light on the work of the honouree, rather than a... 'hey, come and look at ME play' showboating kind of performance that showed little in the way of reverence or tribute to George Harrison himself.

I thought Prince's playing itself was spectacular in that it was showy and somewhat OTT, but I never felt it fitted in with the rest of the performance, which was a very real and heartfelt tribute to someone other than Prince. While it might seem as if I'm anything but sitting on the fence, and that I'm criticising Prince, there is another side to my feelings.... namely, what would one expect from Prince when asking him to perform? Prince was never one for hiding his light under a bushell when he was on stage, and if you've invited him to walk on-stage mid song and solo, you were really only ever going to get one result. Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne could both have playd a version of the original Eric Clapton solo in their sleep, so why invite Prince to join in? What did Dhani, Jeff and Tom think Prince was going to do with those few minutes on stage?

To me it's always been a confusing watch, and a case of strange bedfellows.


sorry but what u say is rubbish. First of all George was not the only star

of the night because Prince was inducted that same night.Second of all tribute was very lame

,going through the motions crap until Prince stepped in with his solo.Listen to the vibe of

the musicians b4 and after Prince starts.he made the band run for their money and they started

to follow Prince and energy level raised to something really memorable.

I bet George would be proud if he had a chance to see and hear what Prince did that night.And Prince did not over play(its not like he put some tapping into his solo or stuff like that) he just opened his soul and it is your loss because you are not diggin it.

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Reply #17 posted 10/04/17 4:43am

rogifan

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I’ve watched this video umpteen times and if you watch closely at the point where Prince is ready to really go for it he gives Petty a look and Petty gives him an approving look back like “ok man let it rip” and then shakes his head in awe of what he’s hearing. This is what Petty told the New York Times in 2016:

https://www.nytimes.com/2....html?_r=0
You see me nodding at him, to say, “Go on, go on.” I remember I leaned out at him at one point and gave him a “This is going great!” kind of look. He just burned it up. You could feel the electricity of “something really big’s going down here.”


And the shows producer said they hardly rehearsed at all because Jeff Lynne’s guitar player kept stepping in (where Prince was supposed to solo) playing Clapton’s part note for note.

They finish, and I go up to Jeff and Tom, and I sort of huddle up with these guys, and I’m like: “This cannot be happening. I don’t even know if we’re going to get another rehearsal with him. [Prince]. But this guy cannot be playing the solos throughout the song.” So I talk to Prince about it, I sort of pull him aside and had a private conversation with him, and he was like: “Look, let this guy do what he does, and I’ll just step in at the end. For the end solo, forget the middle solo.” And he goes, “Don’t worry about it.” And then he leaves. They never rehearsed it, really. Never really showed us what he was going to do, and he left, basically telling me, the producer of the show, not to worry. And the rest is history. It became one of the most satisfying musical moments in my history of watching and producing live music.


I’ve heard the complaints from some that they felt Prince was showboating. What nonsense. Up until his solo it was a completely pedestrian performance. Nothing spectacular and the solos from Lynne’s guitar player were ok but mostly just a faithful rendition of the original recording. It was Prince’s solo at the end that made the performance memorable. Even more so now knowing the backstory. Prince is an amazing guitar player in his own right. Who wants to hear him copy a Clapton solo note for note?
Paisley Park is in your heart
#PrinceForever 💜
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Reply #18 posted 10/04/17 4:47am

purplerabbitho
le

Yeah, he looked pretty happy at the time. In fact, if he really thought it was awkward, why didn't he just quietly play in the background in an indifferent way. His smiling actually seemed to be validating what Prince was doing up there.

The thing is that no matter how much showboating Prince might have done during that song and no matter how many hits the video gets compared to George's live version of his own song...the song will forever be a George Harrison highlight. As famous as Prince is (and acclaimed), the Beatles is the most famous rock band in history and his performance only drew attention to the song. Why Dhani is threatened by this performance is beyond me. Plus, Prince didn't showboat to music he didn't like.

pdiddy2011 said:

Dhani certainly has a right to his opinion, but this just sounds like sour grapes.

There are over 46,000,000 views of the Hall of Fame performance and about 35,000 comments not even acknowledging anyone was on stage (in a very positive way) except for Prince because his performance was transcendent.

Every other version of this song (even those by George and Eric Clapton) is now compared to the Hall of Fame Induction version and many people (for the past 13 years) only reference Prince's performance (positively) when it is mentioned. His dad's live version of the song (with Eric Clapton) doesn't have 1/3 as many views, and it certainly isn't a performance heralded as spectacular.

Dhani was worried about what Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne were thinking, therefore he was smiling? Really? I suppose so, but I hope Dhani plays a lot of poker, because he has the most genuine "awkward" smile I've ever seen.

I also recall Dhani completely in awe and excitedly looking for Prince after the performance as well.


I get the feeling Dhani is a bit annoyed for probably being asked "What was it like to be apart of this glorious time in Prince history?" for 14 years ad nauseum, even though the performance was supposed to be about his dad's legacy.

[Edited 10/4/17 4:13am]

[Edited 10/4/17 4:15am]

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Reply #19 posted 10/04/17 5:03am

rogifan

avatar

pdiddy2011 said:

Dhani certainly has a right to his opinion, but this just sounds like sour grapes.

There are over 46,000,000 views of the Hall of Fame performance and about 35,000 comments not even acknowledging anyone was on stage (in a very positive way) except for Prince because his performance was transcendent.

Every other version of this song (even those by George and Eric Clapton) is now compared to the Hall of Fame Induction version and many people (for the past 13 years) only reference Prince's performance (positively) when it is mentioned. His dad's live version of the song (with Eric Clapton) doesn't have 1/3 as many views, and it certainly isn't a performance heralded as spectacular.


Dhani was worried about what Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne were thinking, therefore he was smiling? Really? I suppose so, but I hope Dhani plays a lot of poker, because he has the most genuine "awkward" smile I've ever seen.


I also recall Dhani completely in awe and excitedly looking for Prince after the performance as well.



I get the feeling Dhani is a bit annoyed for probably being asked "What was it like to be apart of this glorious time in Prince history?" for 14 years ad nauseum, even though the performance was supposed to be about his dad's legacy.






[Edited 10/4/17 4:13am]

[Edited 10/4/17 4:15am]


I think your last sentence is it. This video was played ad nauseum after Prince passed partially because it’s hard to find a lot of Prince performances on YouTube so everyone was sharing this. But I do remember at the time reading comments sections where people complained he was showboating. My goodness isn’t that what these shows should be about? I want to see someone go for it and really let it rip. I’ve watched most RRHOF performances since the beginning and very few, if any, come close to Prince’s opener. Rush, maybe, but that’s about it. Go watch Led Zeppelin playing with Aerosmith & Neil Young...absolutely cringeworthy.
Paisley Park is in your heart
#PrinceForever 💜
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Reply #20 posted 10/04/17 5:24am

CherryMoon57

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I've listened to that interview and it is a little unclear to define what he means by 'gratuitous' at first.

To me, it seems like he is trying to describe how the whole thing became so unexpectedly 'grand' that he felt awkward to be in the middle of it. Maybe not used to the level of passion in which Prince played his music, he then felt a little overwhelmed and out of his comfort zone.


Overall I think he says all this in a good way, otherwise why would he then follow by saying that 'it was definitely a moment to be shared with the whole human race'. Yes he is kind of laughing about the guitar throwing moment and is being honest about his feeling that it was a little OTT but he also ends with 'It was just a classic moment!". Deep down he is probably very proud to have been there but on the surface, he does not want to be seen too awe-struck by another celebrity.

[Edited 10/4/17 5:34am]

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Reply #21 posted 10/04/17 5:33am

LOVESYMBOLNUMB
ER2

CherryMoon57 said:

I've listened to that interview and it is a little unclear to define what he means by 'gratuitous' at first.


To me, it seems like he is trying to describe how the whole thing became so unexpectedly 'grand' that he felt awkward to be in the middle of it. Maybe not used to the level of passion in which Prince played his music, he then felt a little overwhelmed and out of his comfort zone.



Overall
I think he says all this in a good way, otherwise why would he then follow by saying that 'it was definitely a moment to be shared with the whole human race'. Yes he is kind of laughing about the guitar throwing moment and is being honest about his feeling that it was a little OTT but he also ends with 'It was just a classic moment!". Deep down he is probably very proud to have been there but a part of him does not want to be seen too awe-struck by another celebrity.





In my life I have never heard the word gratuitous used in a positive way, by definition it is an insult...I think Dhani back peddled a little when he, (and I) sensed that what he just said blew the interviewers mind a bit...
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Reply #22 posted 10/04/17 5:51am

LOVESYMBOLNUMB
ER2

O.k. So this topic is now dead...since discussing one of the greatest prince performances of all time just got moved to...music-non prince...wait...so one of princes most memorable and talked about performances of his entire life is...not...prince...music...I need to go drink my breakfast now...
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Reply #23 posted 10/04/17 6:29am

rogifan

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LOVESYMBOLNUMBER2 said:

O.k. So this topic is now dead...since discussing one of the greatest prince performances of all time just got moved to...music-non prince...wait...so one of princes most memorable and talked about performances of his entire life is...not...prince...music...I need to go drink my breakfast now...

I don’t understand why things like this get moved. It’s not like the music & more section is overflowing with topics. I’d much rather discuss this than drugs or the estate.
Paisley Park is in your heart
#PrinceForever 💜
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Reply #24 posted 10/04/17 8:47am

poppys

rogifan said:

LOVESYMBOLNUMBER2 said:
O.k. So this topic is now dead...since discussing one of the greatest prince performances of all time just got moved to...music-non prince...wait...so one of princes most memorable and talked about performances of his entire life is...not...prince...music...I need to go drink my breakfast now...
I don’t understand why things like this get moved. It’s not like the music & more section is overflowing with topics. I’d much rather discuss this than drugs or the estate.

Agree.

Kick the old-school joints. For the true funk soldiers.
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Reply #25 posted 10/04/17 8:51am

poppys

That's Show Biz for ya. Nobody much would watch that tribute without Prince. It's all his fault for killing it onstage. falloff

Kick the old-school joints. For the true funk soldiers.
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Reply #26 posted 10/04/17 8:51am

Yewdale

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thebanishedone said:

Yewdale said:


Do you have a link to any credible source that backs up your assertion that Prince was told to let loose during this tribute performance? If so, it might help me climb down from the fence I've been sitting on for all these years when it comes to this clip.


I've been a Beatles nut since I was 11 years old, and a Prince fan since I was 13..... and this year I turned 48, so both of these artists have been with me throughout my teenage and adult life. Being such a huge fan of both artists, I've always been left feeling a little unsure of my thoughts on the tribute.

On the one side, if you isolate Prince's solo (and even the strutting peacock exit) it is indeed something special to see. On the other side, the star of a tribute performance is usually the person who is being honoured, and I feel most artists both respect and display that in their performance, which is usually in keeping with the style of the person being honoured, with the intention of shining a light on the work of the honouree, rather than a... 'hey, come and look at ME play' showboating kind of performance that showed little in the way of reverence or tribute to George Harrison himself.

I thought Prince's playing itself was spectacular in that it was showy and somewhat OTT, but I never felt it fitted in with the rest of the performance, which was a very real and heartfelt tribute to someone other than Prince. While it might seem as if I'm anything but sitting on the fence, and that I'm criticising Prince, there is another side to my feelings.... namely, what would one expect from Prince when asking him to perform? Prince was never one for hiding his light under a bushell when he was on stage, and if you've invited him to walk on-stage mid song and solo, you were really only ever going to get one result. Tom Petty and Jeff Lynne could both have playd a version of the original Eric Clapton solo in their sleep, so why invite Prince to join in? What did Dhani, Jeff and Tom think Prince was going to do with those few minutes on stage?

To me it's always been a confusing watch, and a case of strange bedfellows.


sorry but what u say is rubbish. First of all George was not the only star

of the night because Prince was inducted that same night.Second of all tribute was very lame

,going through the motions crap until Prince stepped in with his solo.Listen to the vibe of

the musicians b4 and after Prince starts.he made the band run for their money and they started

to follow Prince and energy level raised to something really memorable.

I bet George would be proud if he had a chance to see and hear what Prince did that night.And Prince did not over play(its not like he put some tapping into his solo or stuff like that) he just opened his soul and it is your loss because you are not diggin it.


LOL you make me laugh. Passive aggressive start apologising before proclaiming that what I say is rubbish. Which part... every word? And please, let me determine what is and isn't my loss.... and even decide if I am or am not 'diggin' something. I'm pretty sure I commented that I found Prince's performance to be both spectacular and also in isolation 'is indeed something special to see' .... so again, please let ME be the one to determine what I do and don't dig.

I suppose I got off lightly, given that you have decided that Dhani Harrison is little more than a pathetic w**ker. Your choice of username appears apt, to say the least.

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Reply #27 posted 10/04/17 8:58am

Yewdale

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controversy99 said:

Yewdale said:

Do you have a link to any credible source that backs up your assertion that Prince was told to let loose during this tribute performance? If so, it might help me climb down from the fence I've been sitting on for all these years when it comes to this clip............




Apparently Tom Petty is the one who told Prince to cut loose. Many are mourning this week his recent loss. Here's a quote from Tom's drummer, from a NY Times article where they interviewed some of the people who are on stage: . FERRONE Tom sort of went over to him and said, “Just cut loose and don’t feel sort of inhibited to copy anything that we have, just play your thing, just have a good time.” . https://mobile.nytimes.co...-fame.html . I love the solo, but I also thought at the time that it might've been a bit gratuitous. Having read the reactions of the other people on stage, I'm now very comfortable that it was a great and appropriate performance. . Btw, Dhani's comments aren't entirely negative. They're more mixed and whimsical. He says "it was definitely a moment to be shared with the whole human race" and it was "a classic." . It's interesting that Dhani was concerned about what Tom Petty was thinking. Then Petty himself praised the guitar solo in that NY Times article, which quotes Petty several times.


Thanks for that insight, I found it most helpful. I'm really pleased to hear that Tom Petty was the one to tell Prince to cut loose. Following my original post this morning I got to thinking about the whole thing on the drive to work, and on balance I guess the fact that Prince was invited to play was the clincher (until you added about the Petty comments) in feeling more at peace with the 'entire' performance. Thanks.

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Reply #28 posted 10/04/17 9:04am

StrangeButTrue

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rogifan said:

LOVESYMBOLNUMBER2 said:
O.k. So this topic is now dead...since discussing one of the greatest prince performances of all time just got moved to...music-non prince...wait...so one of princes most memorable and talked about performances of his entire life is...not...prince...music...I need to go drink my breakfast now...
I don’t understand why things like this get moved. It’s not like the music & more section is overflowing with topics. I’d much rather discuss this than drugs or the estate.

.

Sometimes its better on the other side lol Stick around, talk about Cardi B or Bruno Mars or Shalamar or whatever.

.

Prince owned that guitar solo, hands down. If it were Clapton or Slash or Eddie VH or whomever we would likely not be having this conversation. Dhani Harrison was blessed with an amazing father but that does not make him any sort of authority on his fathers or any music, to contrast George had recorded the entire Beatles catalog by the time he was the age of Dhani during this one legendary performance.

.

His opinion is his and should be respected but tbh who cares its like asking Paris Jackson about sequined military jackets.

if it was just a dream, call me a dreamer 2
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Reply #29 posted 10/04/17 2:39pm

djThunderfunk

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JorisE73 said:

thebanishedone said:

princes solo was mind blowinbg and what Dhani knows about guitar playing anywat? he was on stage because og who his dad was,not because he knows how to play

pathetic wanker


I have the original broadcast version of the show on DVD somewhere, and at the end of it there's a little thing from backstage after the performance where Dhani is all excited and is asking some interviewer where Prince is because he wants to give him a big hug.

So it seems Dhani is just being an idiot now.


yeahthat He was also quoted in print at the time gushing about Prince's performance, so, he must've changed his mind since then.

We were HERE, where were you?

4 those that knew the number and didn't call... fk all y'all!
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