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Thread started 08/16/17 7:44pm

Goddess4Real

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Elvis Presley: Passed Away 40 years ago, Aniversary RIP

40 Years After Death of Elvis Presley, the Faithful Still Flock to Graceland http://www.nbcnews.com/po...nd-n793351

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Reply #1 posted 08/16/17 7:46pm

Goddess4Real

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Fans Were Charged $28.75 to Visit Elvis Presley's Grave http://time.com/4903348/e...t-charges/

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Reply #2 posted 08/16/17 7:49pm

Goddess4Real

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Inspiration and pioneer – or copycat? Elvis Presley’s ambiguous relationship with black America http://www.independent.co...95906.html

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Reply #3 posted 08/16/17 7:54pm

Goddess4Real

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I liked Elvis, his music and some of his films......My all-time Fav songs are......Trouble/Guitar Man from the Awesome 68 Comeback Special, its Everthing and that is how I will celebrate him today by watching it again (for the 15 million time lol ) its a 5 out of 5 popcorn


[Edited 8/16/17 19:56pm]

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Reply #4 posted 08/16/17 8:03pm

Goddess4Real

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My fav Elvis films are Jailhouse Rock (1957), Viva Las Vegas (1964) Live A Little, Love A Little (1968) Charro (1969)......and especially King Creole (1958) his performance was amazing in it (a role that was intended for James Dean).

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Reply #5 posted 08/16/17 8:09pm

Goddess4Real

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Priscilla Presley Remembers Elvis on the 40th Anniversary of His Death

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Reply #6 posted 08/17/17 3:06am

EmmaMcG

There are two kinds of Elvis. There's Elvis Presley, the 50's rock'n'roller who had an amazing voice and helped popularise and became the face of an entire genre.
Then there's ELVIS. The megastar who picked up a lot of bad habits, went to Vegas and ruined himself.

I much prefer the first kind. And I know a lot of people on here like to downplay his importance and accuse him, as Little Richard did, of making money off of black music but in fairness to Elvis, he never claimed to be an originator of anything. He had a great voice which people were willing to pay a lot of money to hear. What was he supposed to do? Tell them "sorry, I know you want to hear me sing but the kinds of songs I want to sing are derived from 'black music' so I won't do the music I love for fear of stepping on anybodys toes". He was a genuine fan of gospel songs so it stands to reason that he was going to sing them.

Of course it's unfair that there were many other singers at that time, many better than Elvis, who never got a proper opportunity because of the colour of their skin but that shouldn't detract from how good Elvis was in his time.
[Edited 8/17/17 3:07am]
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Reply #7 posted 08/17/17 3:15am

Chancellor

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An Elvis Historian said Elvis spent money faster than he made it...He only had $1 Million in cash when he died...

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Reply #8 posted 08/17/17 10:02am

namepeace

The colored folks been singing it and playing it just like I'm doing now, man, for more years than I know. I got it from them. Down in Tupelo, Mississippi, I used to hear old Arthur Crudup bang his box the way I do now, and I said if I ever got to the place where I could feel all old Arthur felt, I'd be a music man like nobody ever saw.

Elvis Presley, as quoted in Time, "Elvis Rocks. But He's Not The First," July 6, 2004.

Elvis' history is complicated, and the tales of him being a racist are exaggerated. (Even Chuck D apologized for his iconic line in "Fight The Power.")

He took what he learned from artists he loved and made a killing. I can't blame him individually. His audiences weren't ready to make the Arthur Crudups, Big Mama Thorntons and Little Richards of the world international superstars, but they'd love hearing people that looked like themselves sing like those artists. Into the breach stepped Elvis. Like Benny Goodman before him. And so on.

But lost in his legacy is the fact that he was a supremely talented musician and entertainer. RIP.

twocents

Good night, sweet Prince | 7 June 1958 - 21 April 2016

Props will be withheld until the showing and proving has commenced. -- Aaron McGruder
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Reply #9 posted 08/17/17 11:04am

MickyDolenz

Chancellor said:

An Elvis Historian said Elvis spent money faster than he made it...He only had $1 Million in cash when he died...

It also didn't help that Colonel Parker had a gambling problem. That's one of the reasons he had Elvis performing when he shouldn't have been doing so. Elvis could have been getting his health together. Elvis was pretty much working for Parker when it should have been the other way around and then he got 50%.

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. ~ Johnnie Taylor
If a person can't get in a vehicle and actually do it, then it shouldn't be filmed. ~ John Schneider on CGI car stunts
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Reply #10 posted 08/17/17 11:20am

Brendan

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namepeace said:

The colored folks been singing it and playing it just like I'm doing now, man, for more years than I know. I got it from them. Down in Tupelo, Mississippi, I used to hear old Arthur Crudup bang his box the way I do now, and I said if I ever got to the place where I could feel all old Arthur felt, I'd be a music man like nobody ever saw.

Elvis Presley, as quoted in Time, "Elvis Rocks. But He's Not The First," July 6, 2004.

Elvis' history is complicated, and the tales of him being a racist are exaggerated. (Even Chuck D apologized for his iconic line in "Fight The Power.")

He took what he learned from artists he loved and made a killing. I can't blame him individually. His audiences weren't ready to make the Arthur Crudups, Big Mama Thorntons and Little Richards of the world international superstars, but they'd love hearing people that looked like themselves sing like those artists. Into the breach stepped Elvis. Like Benny Goodman before him. And so on.

But lost in his legacy is the fact that he was a supremely talented musician and entertainer. RIP.

twocents



I dig the way you dig. Fantastic.
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Reply #11 posted 08/17/17 1:16pm

namepeace

Brendan said:

namepeace said:

The colored folks been singing it and playing it just like I'm doing now, man, for more years than I know. I got it from them. Down in Tupelo, Mississippi, I used to hear old Arthur Crudup bang his box the way I do now, and I said if I ever got to the place where I could feel all old Arthur felt, I'd be a music man like nobody ever saw.

Elvis Presley, as quoted in Time, "Elvis Rocks. But He's Not The First," July 6, 2004.

Elvis' history is complicated, and the tales of him being a racist are exaggerated. (Even Chuck D apologized for his iconic line in "Fight The Power.")

He took what he learned from artists he loved and made a killing. I can't blame him individually. His audiences weren't ready to make the Arthur Crudups, Big Mama Thorntons and Little Richards of the world international superstars, but they'd love hearing people that looked like themselves sing like those artists. Into the breach stepped Elvis. Like Benny Goodman before him. And so on.

But lost in his legacy is the fact that he was a supremely talented musician and entertainer. RIP.

twocents

I dig the way you dig. Fantastic.


thumbs up! peace

Good night, sweet Prince | 7 June 1958 - 21 April 2016

Props will be withheld until the showing and proving has commenced. -- Aaron McGruder
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Reply #12 posted 08/17/17 1:53pm

paisleypark4

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Goddess4Real said:

Inspiration and pioneer – or copycat? Elvis Presley’s ambiguous relationship with black America http://www.independent.co...95906.html

Ugh im tired of this coming up with his legacy. Its been talked about to death. False info actaully caused me to avoid his music as a teen..until I found out the truth. now i have been buying his music and discovering good stuff.

I can actually listen to his MUSIC for once.

One of my favs:

Download all the shit hop that you can for your kids, neices, nephews, and their friends also. That will prevent them from going out and buying it and will prevent some shit hop sales. Every little bit helps - Andy
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemus
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Reply #13 posted 08/17/17 10:56pm

Goddess4Real

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I have been listening to this song alot, especially with what's been happening this week pray Elvis Presley - If I Can Dream 68 Comeback Special.


[Edited 8/17/17 23:09pm]

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Reply #14 posted 08/18/17 1:49am

thetimefan

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Micky is right Col Parker had a gambling problem and sadly used Elvis as a walking ATM. In his prime Elvis was unstoppable. I think him joining the Army although definitely honourable put him on ice so his competition could draw level and surpass him. Plus the songs started to gradually decline in quality. If he had stuck with Leiber and Stoller then his career would have only gotten better and better. Post Army Elvis was still great but he lost some of that pizazz which made him a superstar. Personally my favourite Elvis songs are the Sun records ones and the first album and definitely all his gospel records. Elvis Country and his Stax recordings are also very good. Also Pot Luck, Elvis is Back, Jailhouse Rock come to mind as recommended Elvis LPs.
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Reply #15 posted 08/18/17 8:23pm

MickyDolenz

A Boy From Tupelo: The Complete 1953-1955 Recordings
release: July 28, 2017
https://68.media.tumblr.com/7ce45a8c95b5deb15d10a84094cfa614/tumblr_osj5cwZka61rw606ko1_r4_1280.jpg
Legacy Recordings, the catalog division of Sony Music Entertainment, and RCA Records will release Elvis Presley – A Boy From Tupelo – The Complete 1953-1955 Recordings on Friday, July 28.

Available as a 3CD deluxe box set and a digital collection, A Boy From Tupelo – The Complete 1953-1955 Recordings is the most comprehensive collection of early Elvis recordings ever assembled, with many tracks becoming available for the first time as part of this package and one performance–a newly discovered recording of “I Forgot To Remember To Forget” (from the Louisiana Hayride, Shreveport, Louisiana, October 29, 1955)–being officially released for the first time ever.

A Boy From Tupelo – The Complete 1953-1955 Recordings includes–for the first time in one collection–every known Elvis Presley Sun Records master and outtake, plus the mythical Memphis Recording Service Acetates–“My Happiness”/”That’s When Your Heartaches Begin” (recorded July 1953) and “I’ll Never Stand in Your Way”/”It Wouldn’t Be the Same (Without You)” (recorded January 4, 1954)–the four songs Elvis paid his own money to record before signing with Sun. A Boy From Tupelo – The Complete 1953-1955 Recordings includes every Elvis live performance and radio recording known to exist from the period.

Essential to the understanding and appreciation of Elvis and his explosive impact on pop music and culture, A Boy From Tupelo – The Complete 1953-55 Recordings presents–in the best possible sound– every known Presley recording from his early career, when the world’s first atomic singer fused blues, pop and hillbilly country swing to create an electrifying new music that changed the world.

A Boy From Tupelo – The Complete 1953-1955 Recordings also includes a 120-page book formatted as an illustrated travelogue and datebook chronicling the genesis of Elvis’ early career via facts, anecdotes, memorabilia and many rare photos. Independence Day 1954 is when this unique American saga begins, less than 24 hours before his first professional recording session, and it ends in December 1955, when the singer leaves Sun Records to record for RCA. The material is organized by calendar entries. During the months July through October 1954, the majority of the calendar is empty, as Elvis had his daytime job with Crown Electric, and music making was confined to the weekends and evening hours. This is Elvis Presley before he becomes world-famous, and an account of how this amazing young man readies himself for stardom, a young man on the pinnacle of an unprecedented level of success. “A boy from Tupelo” would become much more than a world-famous superstar, he would become ELVIS!

Behind the making of A Boy From Tupelo – The Complete 1953-55 Recordings lie more than 1,500 hours of restoration work and nearly 200 hours of additional studio time devoted to the painstaking remastering of the material. The results are stunning.

A Boy From Tupelo – The Complete 1953-55 Recordings is produced, researched and written by Ernst Mikael Jørgensen.

Disc one of A Boy From Tupelo – The Complete 1953-1955 Recordings covers the masters Elvis recorded for Sun Records, some variations, and the four sides he paid for himself. Disc two covers all known outtakes, even just the smallest surviving fragments. Disc three covers all the live and radio recordings known to exist.

On July 28th, Legacy Recordings will also release A Boy From Tupelo: The Sun Masters, a single disc 12″ vinyl package that chronicles the rise of Elvis Presley before he became The King of Rock and Roll. Recorded with producer Sam Phillips, guitarist Scotty Moore and bassist Bill Black during his first incredible year as a professional recording artist (July 1954-July 1955), this collection includes Elvis’ complete single A and B-sides for Sun Records, plus additional songs recorded at Sun Studio and released on his landmark self-titled debut album in 1956.

Disc 1
1 My Happiness
2 That’s When Your Heartaches Begin
3 I’ll Never Stand in Your Way
4 It Wouldn’t Be the Same (Without You)
5 Harbor Lights
6 I Love You Because (unprocessed master edit)
7 That’s All Right (45 rpm master)
8 Blue Moon of Kentucky (45 rpm master)
9 Blue Moon
10 Tomorrow Night
11 I’ll Never Let You Go (Little Darlin’)
12 I Don’t Care if the Sun Don’t Shine
13 Just Because
14 Good Rockin’ Tonight
15 Milkcow Blues Boogie
16 You’re a Heartbreaker
17 I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone (slow version)
18 Baby Let’s Play House
19 I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone
20 I Forgot to Remember to Forget
21 Mystery Train
22 Tryin’ to Get To You
23 When It Rains It Pours
24 That’s All Right (RCA single version)
25 Blue Moon of Kentucky (RCA single version)
26 I Love You Because (RCA LP version)
27 Tomorrow Night (RCA LP version)

Disc 2
1 Harbor Lights (takes 1-2, 3/M)
2 Harbor Lights (take 4)
3 Harbor Lights (takes 5-8)
4 I Love You Because (takes 1-2)
5 I Love You Because (take 3)
6 I Love You Because (takes 4-5)
7 That’s All Right (takes 1-3)
8 Blue Moon of Kentucky (slow tempo outtake)
9 Blue Moon (takes 1-4)
10 Blue Moon (take 5)
11 Blue Moon (takes 6-8)
12 Blue Moon (take 9/M)
13 Dialogue (fragment before “Tomorrow Night”)
14 I’ll Never Let You Go (Little Darlin’) (incomplete take)
15 Good Rockin’ Tonight (fragment from vocal slapback tape)
16 I Don’t Care if the Sun Don’t Shine (takes 1-3/M)
17 I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone (slow version, take 1)
18 I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone (slow version, take 2)
19 I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone (slow version, take 3)
20 I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone (slow version, take 4-5)
21 I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone (slow version, takes 6-7)
22 How Do You Think I Feel (guitar slapback tape, rehearsals + take 1)
23 When It Rains It Pours (vocal slapback tape, take 1)
24 When It Rains It Pours (vocal slapback tape, take 2 – rehearsal 1 – takes 3-4)
25 When It Rains It Pours (vocal slapback tape, take 5/M)
26 When It Rains It Pours (vocal slapback tape, take 6-8)

Disc 3
1 That’s All Right
2 Blue Moon of Kentucky
3 Shake, Rattle and Roll
4 Fool, Fool, Fool
5 Hearts of Stone
6 That’s All Right
7 Tweedlee Dee
8 Shake, Rattle and Roll
9 KSIJ Radio commercial with DJ Tom Perryman
10 Money Honey
11 Blue Moon of Kentucky
12 I Don’t Care if the Sun Don’t Shine
13 That’s All Right
14 Tweedlee Dee
15 Money Honey
16 Hearts of Stone
17 Shake, Rattle and Roll
18 Little Mama
19 You’re a Heartbreaker
20 Good Rockin’ Tonight
21 Baby Let’s Play House
22 Blue Moon of Kentucky
23 I Got a Woman
24 That’s All Right
25 Tweedlee Dee
26 That’s All Right
27 I’m Left, You’re Right, She’s Gone
28 Baby Let’s Play House
29 Maybellene
30 That’s All Right
31 Interview with Bob Neal
32 I Forgot To Remember To Forget

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. ~ Johnnie Taylor
If a person can't get in a vehicle and actually do it, then it shouldn't be filmed. ~ John Schneider on CGI car stunts
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Reply #16 posted 08/24/17 8:32am

jjhunsecker

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MickyDolenz said:

Chancellor said:

An Elvis Historian said Elvis spent money faster than he made it...He only had $1 Million in cash when he died...

It also didn't help that Colonel Parker had a gambling problem. That's one of the reasons he had Elvis performing when he shouldn't have been doing so. Elvis could have been getting his health together. Elvis was pretty much working for Parker when it should have been the other way around and then he got 50%.

Also, Parker was an illegal immigrant from Holland, and because he couldn't get a passport, Elvis never performed outside of America. He could have made a killing in Europe and other markets.

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Reply #17 posted 08/25/17 3:31am

Chancellor

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jjhunsecker said:

Also, Parker was an illegal immigrant from Holland, and because he couldn't get a passport, Elvis never performed outside of America. He could have made a killing in Europe and other markets.



The fact that he NEVER performed overseas is proof there was some messed up stuff going on in his Camp...I did not know Elvis had so many things going on that held him back...Maybe he should have talked to Ray Charles...Ray was blind but he was a Business Titan for the Ages...

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Reply #18 posted 08/25/17 8:39am

Comser

Just bought Elvis RCA Album Collection
(60 CD set....I've got a lot of listening to do!)
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Reply #19 posted 08/25/17 10:03am

2045RadicalMat
tZ

Supposedly he had massive amounts of "fecal matter" still lodged in his intenstines....and had a horrible debilitating bowel/constipation problem (which led to retention/weight gain/blood pressure issues/toxicity).

But then again... that all came from the same Dr who prescribed him dozens of pills...so...ya never know.


It does sound plausible. I can still chuckle at FAT Elvis.... particularly his babbling on "ARE YOU LONESOME TONIGHT?"

"Damn Dolores, pick another subject, please...introduce the carpet to something other than your knees...."
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Reply #20 posted 08/25/17 4:06pm

MickyDolenz

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. ~ Johnnie Taylor
If a person can't get in a vehicle and actually do it, then it shouldn't be filmed. ~ John Schneider on CGI car stunts
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Reply #21 posted 08/25/17 4:08pm

MickyDolenz

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. ~ Johnnie Taylor
If a person can't get in a vehicle and actually do it, then it shouldn't be filmed. ~ John Schneider on CGI car stunts
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Reply #22 posted 08/25/17 4:14pm

MickyDolenz

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. ~ Johnnie Taylor
If a person can't get in a vehicle and actually do it, then it shouldn't be filmed. ~ John Schneider on CGI car stunts
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Reply #23 posted 08/25/17 4:22pm

MickyDolenz

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. ~ Johnnie Taylor
If a person can't get in a vehicle and actually do it, then it shouldn't be filmed. ~ John Schneider on CGI car stunts
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Reply #24 posted 08/28/17 3:02am

Chancellor

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Lisa-Marie should have never sold 85% of the trademark Rights..$100 Million is Mega money but still..

[Edited 8/28/17 3:26am]

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Reply #25 posted 08/29/17 10:52am

MickyDolenz

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. ~ Johnnie Taylor
If a person can't get in a vehicle and actually do it, then it shouldn't be filmed. ~ John Schneider on CGI car stunts
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Reply #26 posted 08/29/17 9:07pm

tump

The man could make any song come alive with his vocals. Another legend who was taken advantage of, spat out and died. And still today the bottled magic sells by the truckload.
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Reply #27 posted 09/02/17 9:14pm

MickyDolenz

It's called show business for a reason. It’s 90% business and 10% show. ~ Johnnie Taylor
If a person can't get in a vehicle and actually do it, then it shouldn't be filmed. ~ John Schneider on CGI car stunts
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Reply #28 posted 09/03/17 3:14am

ThePanther

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namepeace said:


Elvis' history is complicated, and the tales of him being a racist are exaggerated. (Even Chuck D apologized for his iconic line in "Fight The Power.")


"The tales of him being a racist are exaggerated" -- They're not only exaggerated, they're 100% false.

Having said that, Chuck D (if you're correct) doesn't need to apologize for anything. I'm pretty sure that Elvis didn't mean shit to him, and that's fine. What's to apologize for?

Amazing Colonel Tom Parker story: Elvis and his manager, the Devil...er, sorry, the Colonel, were very much at odds with one another in the early 70s, and Elvis came close to breaking it off. At one point in 1973, Elvis actually shouted at the Colonel, "You're fired!", but after a week or so Elvis went back to him.

Anyway, in the spring of 1973, the Colonel suggested to Elvis that they sell the potential future royalties on ALL his earlier recordings with RCA (which also owned the Sun recordings) for a one-off down payment of $5.4 million. Trusting Parker's "judgement", Elvis said yes -- seemed like easy money.

Let's break that down for a minute: The Colonel sold future royalty-earnings on every single recording Elvis made -- 650 of them -- from 1954 to 1973, for less than the money Elvis had earned in 1972 alone. After a stroke of the pen, Elvis (and, as it turned out, his estate) would never again see a penny from the royalty-earnings of his life's work. Elvis didn't consult his accountants, who simply did his taxes. He did, however, ask his Daddy Vernon, who thought it was a good deal. They actually thought they were 'putting one over' on RCA. But hey, the Colonel had some urgent gambling debts to pay off.

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Reply #29 posted 09/03/17 7:04pm

jjhunsecker

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ThePanther said:

namepeace said:


Elvis' history is complicated, and the tales of him being a racist are exaggerated. (Even Chuck D apologized for his iconic line in "Fight The Power.")


"The tales of him being a racist are exaggerated" -- They're not only exaggerated, they're 100% false.

Having said that, Chuck D (if you're correct) doesn't need to apologize for anything. I'm pretty sure that Elvis didn't mean shit to him, and that's fine. What's to apologize for?

Amazing Colonel Tom Parker story: Elvis and his manager, the Devil...er, sorry, the Colonel, were very much at odds with one another in the early 70s, and Elvis came close to breaking it off. At one point in 1973, Elvis actually shouted at the Colonel, "You're fired!", but after a week or so Elvis went back to him.

Anyway, in the spring of 1973, the Colonel suggested to Elvis that they sell the potential future royalties on ALL his earlier recordings with RCA (which also owned the Sun recordings) for a one-off down payment of $5.4 million. Trusting Parker's "judgement", Elvis said yes -- seemed like easy money.

Let's break that down for a minute: The Colonel sold future royalty-earnings on every single recording Elvis made -- 650 of them -- from 1954 to 1973, for less than the money Elvis had earned in 1972 alone. After a stroke of the pen, Elvis (and, as it turned out, his estate) would never again see a penny from the royalty-earnings of his life's work. Elvis didn't consult his accountants, who simply did his taxes. He did, however, ask his Daddy Vernon, who thought it was a good deal. They actually thought they were 'putting one over' on RCA. But hey, the Colonel had some urgent gambling debts to pay off.

Chuck D said years later in MOJO Magazine that his comment in "Fight the Power" was an attack on how Elvis was received by America, as opposed to how Chuck Berry or Little Richard was received. Chuck said that he actually considered Elvis to be a great artist

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Forums > Music: Non-Prince > Elvis Presley: Passed Away 40 years ago, Aniversary RIP