independent and unofficial
Prince fan community site
Wed 20th Feb 2019 1:45pm
Welcome! Sign up or enter username and password to remember me
Forum jump
Forums > Music: Non-Prince > P Funk albums
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Page 5 of 7 <1234567>
  New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
Reply #120 posted 12/15/16 9:13am

RJOrion

SoulAlive said:

what do you guys think of Connections and Disconnections,the 1981 album by former P Funk musicians Fuzzy Haskins,Calvin Simon,and Grady Thomas? I'm surprised that they were able to call this a "Funkadelic album",since George Clinton had absolutely no involvement at all (I'm assuming that he own the name 'Funkadelic'?).




Image result for connections and disconnections



"The Witch" is the best song...especially the hook of the song, where they chant, "Ding Dong, The Witch is Dead", and the beat changes into classic p-funk..."Phunklords" and "Youll Like It Too" are cool...they spend alotta tome taking open and subliminal shots at George Clinton
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #121 posted 12/15/16 10:53am

SoulAlive

RJOrion said:

SoulAlive said:

what do you guys think of Connections and Disconnections,the 1981 album by former P Funk musicians Fuzzy Haskins,Calvin Simon,and Grady Thomas? I'm surprised that they were able to call this a "Funkadelic album",since George Clinton had absolutely no involvement at all (I'm assuming that he own the name 'Funkadelic'?).

Image result for connections and disconnections

"The Witch" is the best song...especially the hook of the song, where they chant, "Ding Dong, The Witch is Dead", and the beat changes into classic p-funk..."Phunklords" and "Youll Like It Too" are cool...they spend alotta tome taking open and subliminal shots at George Clinton

"You'll Like It Too" is a good song....my favorite track on the album

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #122 posted 12/15/16 4:51pm

mrwiggles

SoulAlive said:



RJOrion said:


SoulAlive said:

what do you guys think of Connections and Disconnections,the 1981 album by former P Funk musicians Fuzzy Haskins,Calvin Simon,and Grady Thomas? I'm surprised that they were able to call this a "Funkadelic album",since George Clinton had absolutely no involvement at all (I'm assuming that he own the name 'Funkadelic'?).




Image result for connections and disconnections



"The Witch" is the best song...especially the hook of the song, where they chant, "Ding Dong, The Witch is Dead", and the beat changes into classic p-funk..."Phunklords" and "Youll Like It Too" are cool...they spend alotta tome taking open and subliminal shots at George Clinton


"You'll Like It Too" is a good song....my favorite track on the album



I really enjoyed this record. I also remember the ensuing confusion upon its release. We were reading articles talking about The Funks no longer being on WB and then the single was issued. I said well this is a step backwards from Knee Deep. It's a more Plainfield sounding vibe of the early days. Mugs were just bewildered at first. Then the rest of the story broke. By that time I was digging Phunklords, Witch, Call The Doctor, and Grady Thomas' Come Back, which shamefully is not included on the cd reissue.

Pedro Bell (who was actually penning stuff for both camps) says this is a better offering than Electric Spanking. Although I'm not going that far I still dig it, seems a bit more melodic than GC's camp. And of course Ben Power Jr's drum loop from You'll Like It Too has gone down in hip hop history.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #123 posted 12/16/16 1:04am

SoulAlive

Funkadelic

Live – Meadowbrook, Rochester, Michigan – 12th September 1971

Release Notes
  • First time on Vinyl
  • The only official in-concert recording from their early career
  • Crystal clear recordings taken from the soundboard tapes
  • All star line-up featuring George Clinton, Eddie Hazel & Bernie Worrell
  • Double LP set that comes with OBI-strip, Limited to 1000 copies

Tidal Waves Music proudly presents: FUNKADELIC Live – Meadowbrook, Rochester, Michigan – 12th September 1971

Contained here is a unique snapshot of Funkadelic’s live performance at the height of their powers. Recorded live at Meadowbrook, Rochester, Michigan on the 12th of September 1971, this is the only official in-concert recording from their early career.

The crystal clear recordings here (taken from the soundboard master tapes) provide you with an overdose of free-floating psychedelic black rock and spaced-out jams that can only be described as ‘Jimi Hendrix, James Brown & Sun Ra making a love-child live on stage’.

This release also includes extensive & exhaustive liner notes from the Grammy-award winning professor of ethnomusicology ‘Rob Bowman’ who goes over each track in detail and also wrote down quotes from Bernie Worrell & Billy Bass.

Featuring an all-star line up that includes George Clinton, Fuzzy Haskins, Calvin Simon, Grady Thomas, Ray Davis, Tyrone Lampkin, Eddie Hazel, Billy Bass Nelson, Bernie Worrell & former Isaac Hayes sideman Harold Beane.

order here Live – Meadowbrook, Roc...ic Records

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #124 posted 12/16/16 2:45pm

HardcoreJollie
s

avatar

The following is an excerpt from my new book "Everything Is on the One: The First Guide of Funk" from the end of my extensive George Clinton essay where I rate all their albums. Scale is based on 5-star style rating only using the letters F-U-N-K-Y instead, with an exclamation points added for the very best works. Hope you all enjoy!

Here is a link about the book: http://www.einpresswire.c...-bookshelf

Here is link to obtain the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp...4865a2eed3

GEORGE CLINTON: THE RATINGS. . .

Funkadelic - Funkadelic (Westbound, 1970) - FUNK

Funkadelic - Free Your Mind and Your Ass Will Follow (Westbound, 1970) - FUNK

Funkadelic - Maggot Brain (Westbound, 1971) - FUNKY!

Funkadelic - America Eats Its Young (Westbound, 1972) - FUN

Funkadelic - Cosmic Slop (Westbound, 1973) - FUNKY

Funkadelic - Standing on the Verge of Getting It On (Westbound, 1974) - FUNK

Funkadelic - Greatest Hits (Westbound, 1975) - FUNKY

Funkadelic - Let’s Take It to the Stage (Westbound, 1975) - FUNKY

Funkadelic - Tales of Kidd Funkadelic (Westbound, 1976) - FUNK

Funkadelic - Hardcore Jollies (Warner Bros., 1976) - FUNK

Funkadelic - The Best of the Early Years (Westbound, 1977) - FUNKY

Funkadelic - One Nation Under a Groove (Warner Bros., 1978) - FUNKY!

Funkadelic – “One Nation Under a Groove” (Warner Bros., 1978) – FUNKY!

Funkadelic - Uncle Jam Wants You (Warner Bros., 1979) - FUNK

Funkadelic - The Electric Spanking of War Babies (Warner Bros., 1981) - FUNK

Funkadelic - Connections and Disconnections (LAX, 1981) - FU

Funkadelic - By Way of the Drum (Unreleased, 1989; Editor update: released 2007, HIP-O Select) - FUN

Funkadelic - Music for Your Mother (Westbound, 1992) - FUNKY!

Funkadelic - Greatest Hits Live 1972-1993 (AEM, 1993) - FUNKY!

Parliament - First Thangs (HDH, 1970) - FUNKY

Parliament - Up for the Down Stroke (Casablanca, 1974) - FUN

Parliament - Chocolate City (Casablanca, 1975) - FUNK

Parliament - Mothership Connection (Casablanca, 1975) - FUNKY!

Parliament - The Clones of Dr. Funkenstein (Casablanca, 1976) - FUNKY

Parliament - Live – P-Funk Earth Tour (Casablanca, 1977) - FUNK

Parliament - Funkentelechy vs. the Placebo Syndrome (Casablanca, 1977) - FUNKY

Parliament - The Motor Booty Affair (Casablanca, 1978) - FUNKY

Parliament - Gloryhallastoopid (Pin the Tale on the Funky) (Casablanca, 1979) - FUNK

Parliament - Trombipulation (Casablanca, 1980) - FUN

Parliament - Greatest Hits (Casablanca, 1984) - FUNKY

Parliament - Tear the Roof Off the Sucker (Casablanca, 1993) - FUNKY!

Ruth Copeland - I Am What I Am (Invictus, 1971) - FUN

Ruth Copeland - Self Portrait (Invictus, 1971) - FUN

Bootsy’s Rubber Band - Stretchin’ Out In (Warner Bros., 1976) - FUNKY

Bootsy’s Rubber Band – Ah ... the Name Is Bootsy, Baby (Warner Bros., 1977) - FUNKY!

Bootsy’s Rubber Band - Bootsy? Player of the Year (Warner Bros., 1978) - FUNK

Bootsy’s Rubber Band - This Boot Is Made for Fonkin’ (Warner Bros., 1979) - FUN

Bootsy - Ultra Wave (Warner Bros., 1980) - FUN

Zapp - Zapp (Warner Bros., 1980) - FUN

William Bootsy Collins - The One Giveth, the Count Taketh Away (Warner Bros., 1982) - FUNK

Bootsy’s Rubber Band - “Body Slam” (Warner Bros., 1982) - FUNKY

Bonzo Goes to Washington - “5 Minutes” (Sleeping Bag, 1984) - FUNK

Bootsy Collins - What’s Bootsy Doin’? (Columbia, 1988) - FUNK

Bootsy’s Rubber Band - Jungle Bass (4th & B’way, 1991) - FU

Zillatron - Lord of the Harvest (Polystar, 1993) - FUNK

Buckethead - Giant Robot (Polystar, 1993) - FUNKY

Bootsy’s New Rubber Band - Blasters of the Universe (P-Vine, 1993) - FUNKY

Fuzzy Haskins - A Whole Nother Thang (Westbound, 1976) - FU

Fuzzy Haskins - Radio Active (Westbound, 1978) - FU

Eddie Hazel - Games, Dames and Guitar Thangs (Warner Bros., 1977) - FUN

Eddie Hazel - Jams From the Heart, EP (JDC, 1994) - FU

Fred Wesley and the Horny Horns - A Blow for Me, a Toot for You (Atlantic, 1977) - FUNK

Fred Wesley and the Horny Horns - Say Blow by Blow Backwards (Atlantic, 1979) - FU

Brides of Funkenstein - Disco to Go (Atlantic, 1978) - FUNK

Brides of Funkenstein - Never Buy Texas From a Cowboy (Atlantic, 1979) - FUNK

Parlet - Pleasure Principle (Casablanca, 1978) - FU

Parlet - Invasion of the Booty Snatchers (Casablanca, 1979) - FUNK

Parlet - Play Me or Trade Me (Casablanca, 1980) - FUNK

Bernie Worrell - All the Woo in the World (Arista, 1978) - FUNK

Bernie Worrell - Funk of Ages (Gramavision, 1990) - FUN

Bernie Worrell - Blacktronic Science (Gramavision, 1993) - FUNKY

Bernie Worrell - Pieces of Woo: The Other Side (CMB, 1994) - FUNK

Quazar - Quazar (Arista, 1978) - FUNK

Mutiny - Mutiny on the Mamaship (CBS, 1979) - FUNK

Mutiny - Funk Plus the One (CBS, 1980) - FUNK

Mutiny - A Night Out With the Boys (J. Romeo, 1983) - FUN

Philippe Wynne - Wynne Jammin’ (Uncle Jam, 1980) - FU

Sweat Band - Sweat Band (Uncle Jam, 1980) - FUNK

Junie - Bread Alone (Columbia, 1980) - FUN

Junie - Junie 5 (Columbia, 1981) - FUNK

Junie Morrison - Evacuate Your Seats (Island, 1984) - FUN

J.S. Theracon - “Buckets ‘O Duckats/Shake Like T. Mofo” (Akashic, 1987) - FUNKY

Godmoma - Here (Elektra, 1981) - FU

George Clinton - Computer Games (Capitol, 1982) - FUNK

George Clinton - You Shouldn’t-Nuf Bit Fish (Capitol, 1983) - FUNK

George Clinton - Some of My Best Jokes Are Friends (Capitol, 1985) - FUN

George Clinton - R&B Skeltons in the Closet (Capitol, 1986) - FUNKY

George Clinton - The Mothership Connection Live From Houston (Capitol, 1986) - FUN

George Clinton - The Cinderella Theory (Paisley Park, 1989) - FUN

George Clinton - Sample Some of Disc, Sample Some of DAT (Music of Life, 1993) - F

George Clinton - Sample Some of Disc, Sample Some of DAT (Music of Life, 1993) - F

George Clinton - Hey Man ... Smell My Finger (Paisley Park, 1993) - FUNKY

P-Funk All-Stars - Urban Dancefloor Guerrillas (CBS, 1983) - FUNK

Various Artists - Our Gang Funky (MCA, 1989) - FU

P-Funk All-Stars - Live at the Beverly Theater in Hollywood (Westbound, 1990) - FUNKY

Various Artists - Gettin’ It Off (Westbound, 1992) - FUN

P-Funk All-Stars - Go for Yer Funk (P-Vine, 1993) - FUN

P-Funk All-Stars - Plush Funk (P-Vine, 1993) - FUNK

P-Funk All-Stars - P Is the Funk (P-Vine, 1993) - FUNKY

P-Funk All-Stars - Testing Positive for the Funk (P-Vine, 1993) - FU

P-Funk All-Stars - A Fifth of Funk (P-Vine, 1993) - FUNK

Various Artists - Classic P-Funk Mastercuts Volume 1 (Beechwood, 1993) - FUNK

Kiddo - Kiddo (A&M, 1983) - FUN

Kiddo - Action (A&M, 1984) - FU

Erasmus Hall - Gohead (Capitol, 1984) - FU

Jimmy G. and the Tackheads - Federation of Tackheads (Capitol, 1985) - FUN

Incorporated Thang Band - Lifestyles of the Roach and Famous (Warner Bros., 1988) - FUN

Red Hot Chili Peppers - Freaky Styley (EMI, 1985) - FUNKY

Otis Day and the Knights - Shout (MCA, 1989) - FUN

Menace - Doghouse (Jump Street, 1989) - FU

Maceo Parker - Roots Revisited (Minor, 1990) - FU

Maceo Parker - All the King’s Men (4th & B’way, 1990) - FUN

Limbo Maniacs - Stinky Grooves (In Effect, 1990) - FUN

Material - The Third Power (Axiom, 1991) - FU

Material - Hallucination Engine (Axiom, 1994) - F

Treylewd - Drop the Line (Warner Bros., 1992) - FUN

Praxis - Transmutation (Mutatis Mutandis) (Axiom, 1992) - FUNKY

Praxis - Sacrifist (Subharmonic, 1994) - FU

Third Eye - Hardware (Polystar, 1992) - FUNK

O.G. Funk - Outa the Dark (Polystar, 1993) - FUNK

Umar Bin Hassan - Be Bop or Be Dead (Axiom, 1993) - FUN

The Last Poets - Holy Terror (P-Vine, 1993) - FUNK

Editor update: Clinton ended Funkadelic’s 33-year hiatus in December 2014 with the epic, three-CD, 33-track First Ya Gotta Shake the Gate [FUNK]. He also released his autobiography, “Brothas Be, Yo Like George, Ain’t That Funkin Kinda Hard on You” [FUNKY] in 2014. Parliament’s first release since 1980 was also promised but yet to materialize. Keyboard wizard Bernie Worrell passed away from cancer in June 2016. Other notable post-1994 P-Funk releases include Clinton’s Dope Dogs [FUN] and the double-CD How Late Do U Have 2BB4UR Absent [FUN] and great remix collection Extended Pleasure [FUNKY]; Bootsy’s Fresh Outta ‘P’ University [FUNK], Play With Bootsy [FU] and The Funk Capitol of the World [FUN]; Worrell’s Free Agent: A Spaced Odyssey [FUN] and Improviszario [FUN]; Former Bride of Funkenstein Dawn Silva’s All My Funky Friends [FUN]; Blackbyrd McKnight’s ‘Bout Funkin’ Time [FUN]; and Bill Laswell’s P-Funk tribute under the Axiom Funk banner, the two-CD Funkcronomicon [FUN]. In September 2016, the iconic Mothership stage prop was placed in the new Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture along with other Parliament-Funkadelic artifacts.

If you've got funk, you've got style.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #125 posted 12/16/16 4:52pm

SoulAlive

^^^^I have been so busy lately,but I get a week off for Christmas.I'll finally have a chance to read your book smile
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #126 posted 12/16/16 6:00pm

mrwiggles

Cannot wait to read it HardcoreJollies. Sooooo nicety.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #127 posted 12/16/16 6:06pm

mrwiggles

SoulAlive said:

Funkadelic


Live – Meadowbrook, Rochester, Michigan – 12th September 1971



O

Release Notes


  • First time on Vinyl

  • The only official in-concert recording from their early career

  • Crystal clear recordings taken from the soundboard tapes

  • All star line-up featuring George Clinton, Eddie Hazel & Bernie Worrell

  • Double LP set that comes with OBI-strip, Limited to 1000 copies




Tidal Waves Music proudly presents: FUNKADELIC Live – Meadowbrook, Rochester, Michigan – 12th September 1971


Contained here is a unique snapshot of Funkadelic’s live performance at the height of their powers. Recorded live at Meadowbrook, Rochester, Michigan on the 12th of September 1971, this is the only official in-concert recording from their early career.


The crystal clear recordings here (taken from the soundboard master tapes) provide you with an overdose of free-floating psychedelic black rock and spaced-out jams that can only be described as ‘Jimi Hendrix, James Brown & Sun Ra making a love-child live on stage’.


This release also includes extensive & exhaustive liner notes from the Grammy-award winning professor of ethnomusicology ‘Rob Bowman’ who goes over each track in detail and also wrote down quotes from Bernie Worrell & Billy Bass.


Featuring an all-star line up that includes George Clinton, Fuzzy Haskins, Calvin Simon, Grady Thomas, Ray Davis, Tyrone Lampkin, Eddie Hazel, Billy Bass Nelson, Bernie Worrell & former Isaac Hayes sideman Harold Beane.



order here Live – Meadowbrook, Roc...ic Records




Fascinating gig right here. Billy Bass doesn't like it, well he doesn't seem to like anything lol. This was Ty Lampkins baptismal by funk. Billy says Funkadelic ain't Funkadelic without Tiki at the helm. That being said this is still an incredible window into the early Funks.

All we need now is a gig from this same era before Tiki left. And something from the 72-75 period of America Eats and Slop. There are a couple from the Sugar Shack in 74/75 but as far as I know no one has ever put out anything 72-73.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #128 posted 12/18/16 8:24pm

SoulAlive

Image result for george clinton and p funk  bookImage result for george clinton and the cosmic odyssey bookImage result for george clinton book

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #129 posted 12/19/16 9:22am

HardcoreJollie
s

avatar

SoulAlive said:

Image result for george clinton and p funk  bookImage result for george clinton and the cosmic odyssey bookImage result for george clinton book

Never seen that pictorial book, has anyone on this board seen an actual copy and if so would they recommend it?

If you've got funk, you've got style.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #130 posted 12/19/16 12:04pm

SoulAlive

HardcoreJollies said:

SoulAlive said:

Image result for george clinton and p funk  bookImage result for george clinton and the cosmic odyssey bookImage result for george clinton book

Never seen that pictorial book, has anyone on this board seen an actual copy and if so would they recommend it?

a family member actually bought me a copy of that pictorial book for Christmas smile I've been "hinting" that I wanted it,lol.Can't wait to read it.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #131 posted 12/19/16 2:10pm

SoulAlive

looks like George approves of that book smile

Image result for george clinton p funk book

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #132 posted 12/19/16 2:11pm

mrwiggles

I have never seen inside the pictorial book but have always been intrigued by it.

The Needs book is in need of a serious edit job as it contains lots of incorrect info. Don't know of it is editing or just shoddy research but it's chock full of inconsistencies. That being said, when Needs does come correct he nails it with some hilarious insights on The Funks.

Now Clinton's memoirs is brilliantly written, although he omits a lot.

Hardcore Jollies, were you at any of the legendary LA Funk Fests? If so, could you give a brief run down from the wide world of wiggles? I heard Trick James stole the show from the Mob at the 79 funktion.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #133 posted 12/20/16 7:07am

HardcoreJollie
s

avatar

mrwiggles said:

I have never seen inside the pictorial book but have always been intrigued by it. The Needs book is in need of a serious edit job as it contains lots of incorrect info. Don't know of it is editing or just shoddy research but it's chock full of inconsistencies. That being said, when Needs does come correct he nails it with some hilarious insights on The Funks. Now Clinton's memoirs is brilliantly written, although he omits a lot. Hardcore Jollies, were you at any of the legendary LA Funk Fests? If so, could you give a brief run down from the wide world of wiggles? I heard Trick James stole the show from the Mob at the 79 funktion.

mrwiggles, there is what I hope is a very entertaining and enlightening chapter on my most memorable concert and in-person funk experiences in "Everything Is on the One: The First Guide of Funk." Following is a passage addressing your inquiry.

If You Ain’t Gonna Get It On, Take Your Dead Ass Home

There’s no more fitting place to begin a deep discussion about taking funk to the stage than the most famous band for coining that phrase, making that indisputable declaration with the superlative Let’s Take It to the Stage album and title track in 1975. Funkadelic, companion group

Parliament, ringmaster and leader George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, Bernie Worrell and the rest of the Funk Mob are at the head of the class not only as a live act but also as far as being among my most frequently attended concerts — and absolutely most unforgettable. How powerful were they? Consider that part of the reason Parliament-Funkadelic splintered into several offshoots was the need to fill their own opening act slots since most contemporaries, even powerhouses like Earth, Wind and Fire, were understandably intimidated to share a stage with the universe’s supreme sonic funk force.

While I was too young and not yet indoctrinated to see the P-Funk circus during its more cult-like late 1960s through early 1970s era, I did have a chance to see their legendary P-Funk Earth Tour at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in June of 1977 (yes, there was a time when funk sold out stadiums and arenas across the country). The operative word is “chance.” As a devout funkateer since being exposed to Parliament’s seminal Mothership Connection album in 1975, I not only immersed myself in the music and culture but also proselytized to everyone in my circle, exposing them to the hypnotizing grooves whenever possible and converting many new followers in the process. And that turned out to be part of my undoing leading up to the historic landing of the Mothership at the Coliseum.

Having hipped my immediate circle of fellow Caucasian teens to the funk, one of my friends was assigned to purchase our four tickets from the Ticketmaster window in the local Santa Monica Sears. We were then supposed to get our tickets from him and reimburse the money. However, one of my other so-called friends who was not among the original four beat me to pick up the ticket, casting me into the zone of zero funkativity. I was enraged at him (and also my other friend for letting him pay for what should have been my ticket). I confronted and chased him at school in an attempt to beat his ass, including scaling chain-link fences and climbing onto school building rooftops. This went on for at least an hour before I relented, warning him through a fence that from that day forward he had better watch his back.

Considering I heard the show was incredible and never had another chance to see the original Mothership, I still don’t forgive that weasel. There is a happy ending to this story, however. No, I never pounded that clown senselessly. But the next year I was present at what has to be one of the greatest concert experiences of all time; no question it was among the top five of the many hundreds taken in during my lifetime.

I had noticed George Clinton’s protégé act the Brides of Funkenstein was listed to perform its very first headlining show at the Starwood, a standing-room-only, 300-capacity club in West Hollywood, Calif., that was quite popular at that time. By then I was so deep into music and especially funk that I had cultivated a sort of “Spidey sense” about the artists of which I was a fan. And knowing that the Brides would have to have a band with them I had a hunch that perhaps others of the Funk Mob would be present. I shared my suspicion with a couple of other friends, convincing them to take the gamble and join me (it helped that tickets were only in the $10 range, although not insignificant at the time for high school kids).

After arriving at the venue the evening of Nov. 16, 1978, we found ourselves shoulder-to-shoulder in a packed house with a perceptible buzz in the air. A P-Funk camp representative eventually appeared on stage and told the crowd they were going to be bringing the funk to us in three parts, first opening comedian James Wesley Harding (who often toured with P-Funk), then the Brides and then Parliament-Funkadelic! The place went berserk, with no one shouting louder or throwing their P-Funk sign into the air with more authority than me. While my funky sixth sense had proven right about what was in store, I later found out Clinton had revealed his hand on local radio that day, ensuring the venue was spilling over and with hundreds of people turned away outside.

The show, which would kick off what came to be known as the Anti-Tour in which with little advance fanfare the Funk Mob would pop up at club-sized venues around the country, afforded Clinton and his cohorts a much-needed reprieve following the utter insanity and massive crowds of the Earth Tour. The Brides (Dawn Silva and Lynn Mabry) were a feast for entranced eyes and dancing feet, backed by a band of mostly newcomers to the P-Funk fold. They included DeWayne “Blackbyrd” McKnight (guitar), Jeff “Cherokee” Bunn (bass) and Dennis Chambers (drums). I remember being particularly impressed with Blackbyrd, who despite the relatively short set was given the space to contribute a blistering solo spotlight. All of them would go on to ingratiate themselves as important, longtime members of the P-Funk family.

Finally around midnight, the curtain rose again and, as memory serves, the band led by diaper-clad frontman Garry Shider launched into a throbbing “Cholly (Funk Get Ready to Roll”), with Clinton later strolling on stage amid a deafening and orgasmic collision of electrified sound and roaring hollers. The place rocked for three hours until the wee hours of the morning.

The heat generated on stage was matched by the venue’s steadily rising temperature (the fire marshal would have had a field day). The sweaty throng vibrated in unison until the last groovalistic gasp, following which everyone stumbled out onto Santa Monica Blvd. with wobbly legs, soaked clothing, buzzing ears and dazed smiles plastered on their blissful faces. Libations and substances notwithstanding, all were riding the altered state of having received the ultimate funktastic high. I would subsequently see at least a dozen more P-Funk shows, but none quite like that one.

You can read more about this book here: http://www.einpresswire.c...-bookshelf

And you can sample or buy it here: https://www.amazon.com/gp...4865a2eed3

51RUtZT2U6L.jpg


Peace and funky holidaze!

If you've got funk, you've got style.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #134 posted 12/20/16 10:53am

SoulAlive

^^damn,I wish I could have seen Parliament Funkadelic during that era! I'm sure that concert was incredible.

.

[Edited 12/20/16 11:27am]

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #135 posted 12/21/16 1:21am

SoulAlive

Funkadelic 1976 album Hardcore Jollies

Image result for hardcore jollies

It's interesting that Hardcore Jollies (their first album for Warner Bros.) was released around the same time as Tales Of Kidd Funkadelic (their final album for Westbound Records).What album do you think is better?

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #136 posted 12/21/16 5:49am

HardcoreJollie
s

avatar

SoulAlive said:

Funkadelic 1976 album Hardcore Jollies

Image result for hardcore jollies

It's interesting that Hardcore Jollies (their first album for Warner Bros.) was released around the same time as Tales Of Kidd Funkadelic (their final album for Westbound Records).What album do you think is better?

I always liked HJ better but it is a tough call and Tales grew more on me over time whereas I was all over HJ from the day it came out. HJ is definitely the superior guitar album and Tales the Worrell kyboard extravaganza. In that way, Tales is a little closer to Parliament than HJ. But Undisco Kidd may be the best jam between the two of them.

If you've got funk, you've got style.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #137 posted 12/21/16 11:01am

SoulAlive

^^^yeAh,there is just something really special about "Undisco Kidd"! That groove is so mesmerizing! Bernie Worrell truly shines on that jam.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #138 posted 12/21/16 11:17am

HuMpThAnG

avatar

SoulAlive said:

^^^yeAh,there is just something really special about "Undisco Kidd"! That groove is so mesmerizing! Bernie Worrell truly shines on that jam.

and Bootsy's bass is just nasty guitar

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #139 posted 12/21/16 11:21am

SoulAlive

HuMpThAnG said:

SoulAlive said:

^^^yeAh,there is just something really special about "Undisco Kidd"! That groove is so mesmerizing! Bernie Worrell truly shines on that jam.

and Bootsy's bass is just nasty guitar

nod music

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #140 posted 12/21/16 12:15pm

mrwiggles

HardcoreJollies said:



mrwiggles said:


I have never seen inside the pictorial book but have always been intrigued by it. The Needs book is in need of a serious edit job as it contains lots of incorrect info. Don't know of it is editing or just shoddy research but it's chock full of inconsistencies. That being said, when Needs does come correct he nails it with some hilarious insights on The Funks. Now Clinton's memoirs is brilliantly written, although he omits a lot. Hardcore Jollies, were you at any of the legendary LA Funk Fests? If so, could you give a brief run down from the wide world of wiggles? I heard Trick James stole the show from the Mob at the 79 funktion.

mrwiggles, there is what I hope is a very entertaining and enlightening chapter on my most memorable concert and in-person funk experiences in "Everything Is on the One: The First Guide of Funk." Following is a passage addressing your inquiry.


If You Ain’t Gonna Get It On, Take Your Dead Ass Home


There’s no more fitting place to begin a deep discussion about taking funk to the stage than the most famous band for coining that phrase, making that indisputable declaration with the superlative Let’s Take It to the Stage album and title track in 1975. Funkadelic, companion group



Parliament, ringmaster and leader George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, Bernie Worrell and the rest of the Funk Mob are at the head of the class not only as a live act but also as far as being among my most frequently attended concerts — and absolutely most unforgettable. How powerful were they? Consider that part of the reason Parliament-Funkadelic splintered into several offshoots was the need to fill their own opening act slots since most contemporaries, even powerhouses like Earth, Wind and Fire, were understandably intimidated to share a stage with the universe’s supreme sonic funk force.



While I was too young and not yet indoctrinated to see the P-Funk circus during its more cult-like late 1960s through early 1970s era, I did have a chance to see their legendary P-Funk Earth Tour at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in June of 1977 (yes, there was a time when funk sold out stadiums and arenas across the country). The operative word is “chance.” As a devout funkateer since being exposed to Parliament’s seminal Mothership Connection album in 1975, I not only immersed myself in the music and culture but also proselytized to everyone in my circle, exposing them to the hypnotizing grooves whenever possible and converting many new followers in the process. And that turned out to be part of my undoing leading up to the historic landing of the Mothership at the Coliseum.



Having hipped my immediate circle of fellow Caucasian teens to the funk, one of my friends was assigned to purchase our four tickets from the Ticketmaster window in the local Santa Monica Sears. We were then supposed to get our tickets from him and reimburse the money. However, one of my other so-called friends who was not among the original four beat me to pick up the ticket, casting me into the zone of zero funkativity. I was enraged at him (and also my other friend for letting him pay for what should have been my ticket). I confronted and chased him at school in an attempt to beat his ass, including scaling chain-link fences and climbing onto school building rooftops. This went on for at least an hour before I relented, warning him through a fence that from that day forward he had better watch his back.



Considering I heard the show was incredible and never had another chance to see the original Mothership, I still don’t forgive that weasel. There is a happy ending to this story, however. No, I never pounded that clown senselessly. But the next year I was present at what has to be one of the greatest concert experiences of all time; no question it was among the top five of the many hundreds taken in during my lifetime.



I had noticed George Clinton’s protégé act the Brides of Funkenstein was listed to perform its very first headlining show at the Starwood, a standing-room-only, 300-capacity club in West Hollywood, Calif., that was quite popular at that time. By then I was so deep into music and especially funk that I had cultivated a sort of “Spidey sense” about the artists of which I was a fan. And knowing that the Brides would have to have a band with them I had a hunch that perhaps others of the Funk Mob would be present. I shared my suspicion with a couple of other friends, convincing them to take the gamble and join me (it helped that tickets were only in the $10 range, although not insignificant at the time for high school kids).



After arriving at the venue the evening of Nov. 16, 1978, we found ourselves shoulder-to-shoulder in a packed house with a perceptible buzz in the air. A P-Funk camp representative eventually appeared on stage and told the crowd they were going to be bringing the funk to us in three parts, first opening comedian James Wesley Harding (who often toured with P-Funk), then the Brides and then Parliament-Funkadelic! The place went berserk, with no one shouting louder or throwing their P-Funk sign into the air with more authority than me. While my funky sixth sense had proven right about what was in store, I later found out Clinton had revealed his hand on local radio that day, ensuring the venue was spilling over and with hundreds of people turned away outside.



The show, which would kick off what came to be known as the Anti-Tour in which with little advance fanfare the Funk Mob would pop up at club-sized venues around the country, afforded Clinton and his cohorts a much-needed reprieve following the utter insanity and massive crowds of the Earth Tour. The Brides (Dawn Silva and Lynn Mabry) were a feast for entranced eyes and dancing feet, backed by a band of mostly newcomers to the P-Funk fold. They included DeWayne “Blackbyrd” McKnight (guitar), Jeff “Cherokee” Bunn (bass) and Dennis Chambers (drums). I remember being particularly impressed with Blackbyrd, who despite the relatively short set was given the space to contribute a blistering solo spotlight. All of them would go on to ingratiate themselves as important, longtime members of the P-Funk family.



Finally around midnight, the curtain rose again and, as memory serves, the band led by diaper-clad frontman Garry Shider launched into a throbbing “Cholly (Funk Get Ready to Roll”), with Clinton later strolling on stage amid a deafening and orgasmic collision of electrified sound and roaring hollers. The place rocked for three hours until the wee hours of the morning.



The heat generated on stage was matched by the venue’s steadily rising temperature (the fire marshal would have had a field day). The sweaty throng vibrated in unison until the last groovalistic gasp, following which everyone stumbled out onto Santa Monica Blvd. with wobbly legs, soaked clothing, buzzing ears and dazed smiles plastered on their blissful faces. Libations and substances notwithstanding, all were riding the altered state of having received the ultimate funktastic high. I would subsequently see at least a dozen more P-Funk shows, but none quite like that one.



You can read more about this book here: http://www.einpresswire.c...-bookshelf



And you can sample or buy it here: https://www.amazon.com/gp...4865a2eed3



51RUtZT2U6L.jpg




Peace and funky holidaze!




Utterly mesmerizing. David Byrne has said he was in attendance that night and the song Burning Down The House was literally born based on GC's endless chants. Time for me to buy your book right now my funk brethren.
For what it's worth, I will give Tale the slight nod over Jollies but not by much. They always said Tales was just some scraps thrown together to satisfy the contract. Sheeeit it's one of my faves partly because it was so elusive to me. When it was finally presented to me at about 1980 I just about lost it. I had only heard the Parliament Live version of Undisco Kidd up to that point.
[Edited 12/21/16 12:18pm]
[Edited 12/21/16 12:20pm]
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #141 posted 12/21/16 2:17pm

SoulAlive

mrwiggles said:

For what it's worth, I will give Tale the slight nod over Jollies but not by much. They always said Tales was just some scraps thrown together to satisfy the contract. Sheeeit it's one of my faves partly because it was so elusive to me. When it was finally presented to me at about 1980 I just about lost it. I had only heard the Parliament Live version of Undisco Kidd up to that point.

yeah,the story goes that Tales Of Kidd Funkadelic is really just a collection of 1976 outtakes from the Hardcore Jollies sessions.But oddly enough,I think Tales.... is the better album.Kinda cool that fans got both albums that year.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #142 posted 12/21/16 2:25pm

SoulAlive

in 1975,Parliament released the album Chocolate City

Image result for chocolate city parliament

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #143 posted 12/22/16 1:10am

SoulAlive

^^on this album,the standout jam is "Ride On" headbang

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #144 posted 12/22/16 5:49am

HuMpThAnG

avatar

SoulAlive said:

mrwiggles said:

For what it's worth, I will give Tale the slight nod over Jollies but not by much. They always said Tales was just some scraps thrown together to satisfy the contract. Sheeeit it's one of my faves partly because it was so elusive to me. When it was finally presented to me at about 1980 I just about lost it. I had only heard the Parliament Live version of Undisco Kidd up to that point.

yeah,the story goes that Tales Of Kidd Funkadelic is really just a collection of 1976 outtakes from the Hardcore Jollies sessions.But oddly enough,I think Tales.... is the better album.Kinda cool that fans got both albums that year.

nod

it's the album that introduce me to Funkadelic, back in the day

i remember at very young 11 or 12 yrs old saying, "this is me" after first listening to that album music

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #145 posted 12/22/16 11:03am

SoulAlive

HuMpThAnG said:

SoulAlive said:

yeah,the story goes that Tales Of Kidd Funkadelic is really just a collection of 1976 outtakes from the Hardcore Jollies sessions.But oddly enough,I think Tales.... is the better album.Kinda cool that fans got both albums that year.

nod

it's the album that introduce me to Funkadelic, back in the day

i remember at very young 11 or 12 yrs old saying, "this is me" after first listening to that album music

thumbs up!

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #146 posted 12/22/16 12:52pm

HardcoreJollie
s

avatar

SoulAlive said:

^^on this album,the standout jam is "Ride On" headbang

CO-SIGN!

If you've got funk, you've got style.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #147 posted 12/22/16 2:34pm

SoulAlive

George Clinton & Parl...ve Webcast

161231_glinton

On December 31 funk legend George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic will close out 2016 and ring in 2017 at Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas. If you can’t make it to Sin City in person, there’s an option to watch Clinton and the band from home or wherever you have an internet connection.

nugs.tv will host a webcast featuring George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic live from Las Vegas. The webcast is currently available for pre-order in both SD and HD formats. Look for the stream to begin at 11 p.m. ET on New Year’s Eve.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #148 posted 12/22/16 2:35pm

SoulAlive

^^I can't think of a funkier way to ring in the New Year smile

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #149 posted 12/23/16 1:36am

purplethunder3
121

avatar

SoulAlive said:

George Clinton & Parl...ve Webcast

161231_glinton

On December 31 funk legend George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic will close out 2016 and ring in 2017 at Brooklyn Bowl Las Vegas. If you can’t make it to Sin City in person, there’s an option to watch Clinton and the band from home or wherever you have an internet connection.

nugs.tv will host a webcast featuring George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic live from Las Vegas. The webcast is currently available for pre-order in both SD and HD formats. Look for the stream to begin at 11 p.m. ET on New Year’s Eve.

excited excited excited

"Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination and life to everything." --Plato
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Page 5 of 7 <1234567>
  New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Forums > Music: Non-Prince > P Funk albums