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Thread started 03/04/11 5:59pm

HuMpThAnG

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Phil Collins Quits, Apologizes For Career

Collins, who has made a mark on the musical world as a drummer, pianist, and singer, said,

"I don't think anyone's going to miss me."

The 60-year-old rock and roll veteran began his long career as the drummer for Genesis.

The band quickly gained fame and Collins skyrocketed into superstardom.

Singles like “In the Air Tonight” and “Against All Odds” brought the multitalented Collins a multitude of fan recognition.

But Collins, one of only three recording artists to sell 100 million albums worldwide,

regrets the outcome of his success and the impact it has had on the world of music.

He said, "I'm sorry that it was all so successful. I honestly didn't mean it to happen like that," adding,

"It's hardly surprising that people grew to hate me."

Collins has battled several health issues over the past decade, including dislocated vertebra and nerve damage in his hands.

His ability to hear has decreased drastically as a result of playing so many live shows,

and the afflictions to his hands make it impossible for him to play the drums.

But his physical problems aren’t what pushed Collins out of music.

He doesn’t like what the industry has become.

"I look at the MTV Music Awards and I think: 'I can't be in the same business as this,’” he said.

He added, "I'm much happier to write myself out of the script entirely."

[img:$uid]http://static-p-a.comcast.net/api/assets/cimed-20110304/phil-collins.jpg[/img:$uid]

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Reply #1 posted 03/04/11 6:01pm

Timmy84

Seriously? This came from THE SUN! talk to the hand

I'm gonna need a video of him stating he'll retire. The hell he gotta apologize for? It wasn't his fault people loved his shit (obviously no one put a gun to 100 million people's heads to buy his stuff). lol

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Reply #2 posted 03/04/11 6:04pm

luv4u

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Timmy84 said:

Seriously? This came from THE SUN! talk to the hand

I'm gonna need a video of him stating he'll retire. The hell he gotta apologize for? It wasn't his fault people loved his shit (obviously no one put a gun to 100 million people's heads to buy his stuff). lol

I was thinking the same thing too.

Edmonton, AB - canada

Ohh purple joy oh purple bliss oh purple rapture!
REAL MUSIC by REAL MUSICIANS - Prince
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Reply #3 posted 03/04/11 6:05pm

MickyDolenz

Phil said he was going to retire in the early 1990's, just like Tina Turner & Cher did. smile

For 75 years straight, the #1 genre in music, selling wise, was rock n' roll worldwide. Last year (2017) in June, it got de-crowned by hip hop. Hip hop is the #1 genre. It's hip hop - rock - country - pop or pop - country. ~ Pras
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Reply #4 posted 03/04/11 6:06pm

Timmy84

Oh OK, so he really is thinking of quitting. Didn't read this article.

[img:$uid]http://assets.rollingstone.com/assets/images/story/phil-collins-last-stand-why-the-troubled-pop-star-wants-to-call-it-quits-20110304/1000x306/main.jpg[/img:$uid]

Phil Collins' Last Stand: Why the Troubled Pop Star Wants to Call It Quits

The hearing in his left ear is shot, and a dislocated vertebra has made drumming almost impossible. But those aren't the reasons

By Erik Hedegaard
March 4, 2011 4:43 PM ET

In a rehearsal hall somewhere in Switzerland, Phil Collins is belting out some tunes in front of an 18-piece band, getting ready to go on a small tour to support a new album. He looks happy, snapping his fingers, bopping his head. It's all Motown — upbeat stuff like "Dancing in the Street," "Going to a Go-Go" and "Heat Wave." He's not playing the drums, and not a song of his own passes his lips. There's no "In the Air Tonight," no "Sussudio," no "One More Night," nothing from his Genesis days — none of the hits that turned him into one of the most loved and then most unfairly and inexplicably vilified men in rock & roll.

Later on, halfway through lunch in a mixing room, he happily rolls a great big gherkin around his plate and begins sawing into it with a knife and fork. He's 59 and looks pretty much the way he's always looked: kind of small, kind of bald. He's wearing a green polo shirt, the collar popped. As a solo artist, he has sold 150 million records, which puts him right up there with the all-time greats. He's saying that his new album, Going Back, which features only classic-soul songs, is his "best album ever," that he couldn't resist making it because it's the music he grew up with, and that it may be his last album ever, too. Medically, he's got a few serious and life-altering problems: The hearing in his left ear is shot, and a dislocated vertebra in his neck has rendered him all but unable to pound on the drums that first made him famous. But those aren't the reasons why.


Mainly, it's because he's had it with people thinking they know who Phil Collins is. And not in a good way. He has been called "the Antichrist," the sellout who took Peter Gabriel's Genesis, that paragon of prog-rock, and turned it into a lame-o pop act and went on to make all those supercheesy hits that really did define the 1980s. So, he wants to move on. He could make another original album, but he knows that will bring a rehashing of all the old criticism. It's inescapable. Forget it. He'd rather spend his time in his basement, building up his collection of Alamo memorabilia, which, oddly enough, is his great consuming passion these days. "I sometimes think, 'I'm going to write this Phil Collins character out of the story,'" he says. "Phil Collins will just disappear or be murdered in some hotel bedroom, and people will say, 'What happened to Phil?' And the answer will be, 'He got murdered, but, yeah, anyway, let's carry on.' That kind of thing."

He is already taking steps. When he started dating his girlfriend, Dana Tyler, a TV newscaster from New York, he said to her, "I'm tired of being Phil Collins. You can call me Philip." So that's who he is to her, Philip, anyone but Phil, and that's who he'd like to be to the rest of the world, too. Like he says, in his mind, the guy known as Phil Collins would be better off dead.

Who people think Phil Collins is derives mainly from how absolutely everywhere he was in the 1980s. It's almost impossible to overstate. He released four solo albums during the decade and had 13 hit singles. As Genesis' lead singer and songwriter after Peter Gabriel quit, he was largely responsible for that band's output too, which reached a high point in 1986, with Invisible Touch and its five hit singles. Of all his songs, "In the Air Tonight" was particularly ubiquitous, propelled forward by Collins' towering drum entrance. It became the unofficial theme song for the Eighties drugs-guns-and-glamour cop show Miami Vice; and was used to hawk Michelob beer; and was prominently featured in Risky Business 26 years before Mike Tyson air-drummed new life into the song in The Hangover. And then there was Collins himself. His face was plastered over all his albums, close up, looking placid and somewhat smugly self-serious. He tried his hand at acting (the 1988 movie Buster, an episode of Miami Vice). He came to be known as Mr. Nice Guy. He did lots of charity work. (Later on, he went so far as to pay for well-known-substance-abuser David Crosby's liver transplant.)

But then a curious thing happened. The Eighties ended and the Nineties began in a whole different mood, with Nirvana and other punk-influenced bands establishing grunge as the dominant musical force. In many ways, grunge's threadbare, garage-rock sound was a direct reaction to the overblown, synth-heavy bombast of the previous decade — and no one typified those excesses more than Collins. In the summer of 1994, reports began circulating that Collins had informed his (second) wife that he wanted a divorce — via fax. He denied it vehemently, and the fax itself was never produced, but no matter: Suddenly, it was open season on the guy. Oasis' Noel Gallagher started hammering on him any time he could, to uproarious effect. Among his choicest bons mots: "You don't have to be great to be successful. Look at Phil Collins" and "People hate fucking cunts like Phil Collins, and if they don't, they fucking should." And so it's gone, especially on the Internet, where I Hate Phil Collins sites have flourished. He gets criticized for everything. For his hair, for his height, for his pants (pleated khakis), for his shirts (tucks them in), for being "a shameless, smirking show hog."

"I don't understand it," he says, looking pained. "I've become a target for no apparent reason. I only make the records once; it's the radio that plays them all the time. I mean, the Antichrist? But it's too late. The die is cast as to what I am."

So now he lives in a small Swiss town near Lake Geneva — not in any kind of self-imposed exile, he says, but because his third wife (now his third ex-wife) lived there, and that's where they are raising their two young boys, ages five and seven. His neighborhood is quiet, his chalet-type house is modest, and he can often be seen ferrying his kids to school in his Range Rover. He's got a pair of old wooden skis mounted over the inside entrance to his place, and the pictures on the walls are all of family and friends. He keeps the rock & roll stuff — the Grammys and various awards — in his basement home studio, not too far from the vast expanse of his beloved Alamo collection, which he thinks is one of the largest in the world.

He is down there now, picking up relics and explaining what they are and their significance. He moves softly in the room, which is spotless in the manner of a well-funded museum. Aligned in glass cases, mounted on the walls, secreted away in drawers and stacked in corners are muskets and rifles, Sam Houston's Bowie knife ("Just look at that!"), a signed copy of Davy Crockett's autobiography, a Davy Crockett military-service receipt, a howitzer, pistols, gunpowder pouches, a whole mess of horseshoes, Jim Bowie's visa allowing him to reside in Mexico, swords, musket balls, animal teeth, human teeth, maps, cannonballs, brass powder flasks, a painting of Fess Parker as Davy Crockett, a poster of John Wayne as Davy Crockett, a receipt for a saddle bought by John W. Smith, a courier who happened to be out on a run on the day of the fall of the Alamo and went on to become the first mayor of San Antonio.

Collins' delight in all this seems total. "Just look at that overcoat pocket pistol! Just feel that! This is the Bowie knife I was talking about! And this was supposed to be Bowie's boot knife! Look at that! Want a horseshoe? Here, take a horseshoe!" He goes on, "The Alamo thing has been all-consuming. I mean, I don't come down here and gloat at it all. I come down and look at it all in amazement." As it happens, Collins is liked by Alamo buffs and has been invited to speak at a meeting of Alamo descendants. "They said, 'We're such big fans!' And it's like, 'Wow, they know I exist! I can't believe this is happening! I'm just a fucking pop star!'" He goes on, "You know how in some cultures they say if you take a picture of someone, you take a little bit of their soul? I often think that down here, at night or during the day, something might go on."

One thing that's clearly going on is that the person speaking like this, with such bubbly enthusiasm, seems to be less Phil, probably, and more Philip, or maybe even somebody else entirely. At another Alamo gathering, he says, a clairvoyant approached him and said, "You were here before. You were John W. Smith, the courier." Phil might have scoffed, but Philip thinks it's possible. That receipt he has of Smith's — it was the first scrap of Alamo history Collins ever bought. "That little bit of paper," he says. "That's incredible."

And then there are the photographs. He's got them stored on a laptop upstairs. He has a ton of them, taken by him and some of his Alamo buddies. They're odd. They've got unworldly things in them. "Do you want to see them?" he says. And then adds with mock fright in his voice, "It's some absolutely chilling stuff." But then he goes upstairs, pets his Jack Russell terrier, Travis (named after William Barret Travis, the Alamo commander), and sits at a laptop, where he pulls up picture after picture of the modern-day Alamo and related battle sites, various angles and times, and in the majority of them, soft little glowing balls, whitish in color and semitransparent, sometimes a few, sometimes a great many, seem to be hovering in the air.

"They're orbs," Collins says solemnly. "I'm not sure what the scientific term is, but it's paranormal energy. See this one? Now this one is at Goliad, where, after the Alamo, 400 guys were executed. You've got to be careful. You can talk yourself into this stuff. See how many there are here? I get chills just talking about it. All of those orbs! They're all over the place! If you believe this, then you have to rethink everything you've been taught. That's what freaks me out."

Finally, he goes back to talking about what the clairvoyant had told him: "I don't want to sound like a weirdo. I'm not Shirley MacLaine. But I'm prepared to believe. You've seen the pictures. You can't deny them, so therefore it is a possibility that I was here in another life." And he says lots more about this, too, all of which proves he's not the bland dude everyone thinks he is. He's got a lot of multidimensional fringe in him, and once he gets going on the Alamo, he seems thrilled to be talking about anything and anyone but himself.

Born in a London suburb, Collins first saw TV's Davy Crockett, as played by the late great Fess Parker, when he was five and was so smitten by the show's vision of battlefield heroics and self-sacrifice that he soon proudly sported his own coonskin cap. He took up drums the same year; became a professional child actor at age 14; was in a West End production of Oliver!; was a screaming-teenager extra in the Beatles' A Hard Day's Night; disappointed his dad, a London civil servant, by dropping out of acting to become a musician; played in a few small bands; answered a newspaper ad for a drummer in 1970; joined Genesis; was 19 years old; got married; had a son, adopted a daughter; became Genesis' frontman in 1976; turned it from an arty prog-rock band into a pop-song machine; was too busy to see wife or kids; was left by wife who had started affair with family's interior decorator; released pain and suffering into first solo album; didn't think much of the pivotal drum bit in "In the Air Tonight," even after his friend Eric Clapton listened to a demo version and said, "What the hell, man? What the fuck is that?" while pinned to the wall, blown away by the sound; got married again, had another kid; got divorced again; began transformation into alleged Antichrist; had his music satirized in Bret Easton Ellis' American Psycho, in both the book and the movie (Collins' take: "It was funny. I'd watch it again"); got married again, had kids again, got divorced again; has been kept relevant by vocal admiration from the R&B and rapper crowd: Ice-T, Akon, Bone Thugs-n-Harmony and Lil' Kim, despite growing I Hate Phil Collins sentiment ("His stuff seemed deep to me, like it makes you look into your own self," says Ice-T. "Noel Gallagher should shut the fuck up and calm the fuck down"); and probably will never play the drums in public again.

Due to that neck injury, his hands can no longer hold the sticks. Worse, to him, he can't help his youngest kids build toys. He can't write his name with a pen. He has trouble wiping himself. It sounds terrible, and it is, but since it only affects his ability to grip objects, you'd never know it to look at him. There's nothing frail about him, and a recent surgery may even improve his condition. But as for drumming, he says, "I was going to stop anyway. I had stopped. I don't miss it."

Some of his inner circle, however, aren't so sure about that. "Oh, yeah, of course he misses it," one of them recently said, "but it really wouldn't be like Phil to let on."

Collins really is Mr. Nice Guy, and his recollections of his younger years as a rock star reflect that. He was never a big drinker, never a big dope smoker, has never taken LSD. The closest he came to destroying a hotel room was with his jazz-fusion side band Brand X, when some of the guys Super-Glued the phone handset to the receiver. "I didn't do it, but I felt terrible about it. The maid was going to get blamed. I always felt sorry for the maids." OK, but has he ever slept with a groupie? "No." Ever had a three-way? "Nope, I was never offered that piece of cake," he says. "It is an ambition of mine, though. I've got a few ambitions left, and that might be one of them." He smiles. "I wouldn't mind."

But there does seem to be some serious darkness in him as well. He has spent time imagining battle scenes at the Alamo. "At one point, the Mexicans were killing each other. It was dark, and you killed anything that moved. And then when they attacked the last line of defense, it was hand-to-hand fighting and they went around decapitating all the bodies and making sure they were dead. 'What must that have been like?' I think. And you have things like that coming over your head all the time." He bites his nails. "I'm fascinated by what people will do to each other," he goes on. "Actually, I'm sort of interested in the gory details of life."

The next day at the rehearsal hall, Collins is taking a break and sawing into another gherkin and saying, "When I say, 'I'm going to write myself out of the script,' I'm serious. When I say I'm stopping and I don't care about all this, I'm serious. I mean, I will write songs, and I will have fun making demos, but I may well not make another record. My deal with Atlantic is over with this Motown record. It's sobering and quite liberating. Anyway, I've had enough of being me. Not to the point—"

He pauses, and then he goes on, "I have had suicidal thoughts. I wouldn't blow my head off. I'd overdose or do something that didn't hurt. But I wouldn't do that to the children. A comedian who committed suicide in the Sixties left a note saying, 'Too many things went wrong too often.' I often think about that."

His manner when he says these things is straightforward. He betrays no emotion. The second-biggest pop star of the Eighties (after Michael Jackson) just sits there, seeming like he maybe wished he could blink it all away.

"Everything has added up to a load that I'm getting tired of carrying," he continues. "It's gotten so complicated. It's the three failed marriages, and having kids that grew up without me, and it's the personal criticism, of being Mr. Nice Guy, or of divorcing my wife by fax, all that stuff, the journalism, some of which I find insulting. I wouldn't say that I have suicidal tendencies over my career or bad press. They're just another chink in the wall. It's cumulative. You can say, 'Grow up, man, everybody gets criticism.' I know that. And I've philosophically adjusted to it. But does that make it any more pleasurable? No." And that's the trouble with wishing you were somebody else. As much as you may want it, you know it'll never happen, at least not in this lifetime.

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Reply #5 posted 03/04/11 6:08pm

Musicslave

Who in the hell hates Phil Collins? I'm going to have to see/hear this from another source.

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Reply #6 posted 03/04/11 6:36pm

TonyVanDam

Phil Collins is a legend. F*** Noel Gallagher! biggrin

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Reply #7 posted 03/04/11 7:44pm

diamondpearl1

I for one hate to see him go out like this. His music has been a part of my life and many others for years, but I guess at his level the pressure can cause you to not wanna do it anymore no matter how many people love and/or hate you. Word to Michael Hutchence and Kurt Kobain

[Edited 3/4/11 19:49pm]

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Reply #8 posted 03/04/11 8:04pm

silverchild

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Even though I'm not the biggest Phil Collins/Genesis fan, I have to say it is pretty sad to hear about this. I guess the music business and his lifestyle got in the way, but hey, I wish the best for him if this is true. I heard his new Motown covers album Going Back was pretty good, but I'm not a big fan of covers releases.

Check me out and add me on:
www.last.fm/user/brandosoul
"Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley
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Reply #9 posted 03/04/11 8:27pm

phunkdaddy

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Fuck the critics. Phil Collins music is cool.

Don't laugh at my funk
This funk is a serious joint
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Reply #10 posted 03/04/11 8:29pm

1sotrue

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Phil Collins is truly a f**king legend. His music was the soundtrack to my 'wonder years' from the 80s. When you look at Phil Collins from back in the day this generation would never believe he was a huge pop star. Since nowadays its all about style over substance. Great musician and songwriter.

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Reply #11 posted 03/04/11 8:43pm

Timmy84

To be honest I'm not surprised at the news. Phil had expressed his desire to retire some time ago. He stopped doing world tours after 2004, only to briefly coming out of that retirement when he reunited with Genesis. And he did tell press that Going Back was definitely his final statement as a recording artist so if true, au revoir, Phil, and thank you.

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Reply #12 posted 03/04/11 8:56pm

silverchild

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Timmy84 said:

To be honest I'm not surprised at the news. Phil had expressed his desire to retire some time ago. He stopped doing world tours after 2004, only to briefly coming out of that retirement when he reunited with Genesis. And he did tell press that Going Back was definitely his final statement as a recording artist so if true, au revoir, Phil, and thank you.

I'm gonna have to check out Going Back for myself. From some songs I've already heard off of the album, it doesn't sound bad at all. Such a legend and phenomenal musician.

Check me out and add me on:
www.last.fm/user/brandosoul
"Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you; you just gotta find the ones worth suffering for." -Bob Marley
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Reply #13 posted 03/04/11 9:04pm

dalsh327

His first divorce led to something like 15-20 classic songs. He got "In the Air Tonight" and "Against All Odds" out of it.

As far as he's concerned, if Peter Gabriel isn't going to do a Genesis reunion and his body's jacked up, there's no point in keeping it going. He retired because his hearing was destroyed, but had it fixed, and was able to do a tour for his solo material and one for Genesis.

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Reply #14 posted 03/04/11 9:06pm

Lammastide

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hmm Wow. It's really that bad, dude?!?

Try some Prozac; call up Nigel Godrich; crank out some ingeniously doomy album; maybe earn another Grammy nod or two as the anti-Phil; then retire having ultimately exorcised youself of the pop sellout-ness. shrug Life doesn't have end on such a note of failure.

[Edited 3/5/11 4:15am]

Ὅσον ζῇς φαίνου
μηδὲν ὅλως σὺ λυποῦ
πρὸς ὀλίγον ἐστὶ τὸ ζῆν
τὸ τέλος ὁ χρόνος ἀπαιτεῖ.”
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Reply #15 posted 03/04/11 9:28pm

Se7en

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There really are 2 distinctly different musical worlds right now.

The first one is absolute shit . . . this includes what's on radio, what's on MTV, what's popular on YouTube and the Top 100 on iTunes. It's really all just pop divas, (c)rap, generic R&B and soundalike country. Really, consider Phil Collins in the company of Britney/Rihanna/Pink/Lady GaGa/Eminem/Lil Wayne/Chris Brown/Usher/Taylor Swift/etc. and you can see where he's coming from.

The second musical world . . . you're not going to really hear about it. Hundreds of "legacy" acts release new albums every year, but you won't hear them on the radio or see them on TV. If you're a follower, you'll probably know about their new album directly from them. It's actually very sad that REAL music is missing from the airwaves and TV. Compare Phil Collins to other peers who are also in this group: Bruce Springsteen/Peter Gabriel/Robert Plant/Bob Dylan/Tom Petty/etc.

Imagine if Paul Simon released a new album this year . . . you might have about a 5% chance of hearing about it, but a 95% chance hearing about Britney Spears. There is something really wrong with that!

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Reply #16 posted 03/04/11 10:25pm

MickyDolenz

Se7en said:

There really are 2 distinctly different musical worlds right now.

The first one is absolute shit . . . this includes what's on radio, what's on MTV, what's popular on YouTube and the Top 100 on iTunes. It's really all just pop divas, (c)rap, generic R&B and soundalike country. Really, consider Phil Collins in the company of Britney/Rihanna/Pink/Lady GaGa/Eminem/Lil Wayne/Chris Brown/Usher/Taylor Swift/etc. and you can see where he's coming from.

The second musical world . . . you're not going to really hear about it. Hundreds of "legacy" acts release new albums every year, but you won't hear them on the radio or see them on TV. If you're a follower, you'll probably know about their new album directly from them. It's actually very sad that REAL music is missing from the airwaves and TV. Compare Phil Collins to other peers who are also in this group: Bruce Springsteen/Peter Gabriel/Robert Plant/Bob Dylan/Tom Petty/etc.

Imagine if Paul Simon released a new album this year . . . you might have about a 5% chance of hearing about it, but a 95% chance hearing about Britney Spears. There is something really wrong with that!

It's no different than it's always been. During the Little Richard/Elvis days, the youth weren't interestred in Bing Crosby, Anita O'Day, or Louis Armstrong. Then the British invasion/Motown acts took over from the early rock performers, then singer songwriter, corporate rock, disco, etc.

[Edited 3/4/11 22:26pm]

For 75 years straight, the #1 genre in music, selling wise, was rock n' roll worldwide. Last year (2017) in June, it got de-crowned by hip hop. Hip hop is the #1 genre. It's hip hop - rock - country - pop or pop - country. ~ Pras
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Reply #17 posted 03/04/11 11:03pm

purplethunder3
121

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I don't know why Phil Collins wants to apologize for his career! I totally still love the album Face Value. He had so many good songs. Good song-writer and performer from ole school 1980s.

There's no them...there's only us...
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Reply #18 posted 03/05/11 3:27am

Arnotts

HuMpThAnG said:

Collins, who has made a mark on the musical world as a drummer, pianist, and singer, said,

"I don't think anyone's going to miss me."

The 60-year-old rock and roll veteran began his long career as the drummer for Genesis.

The band quickly gained fame and Collins skyrocketed into superstardom.

Singles like “In the Air Tonight” and “Against All Odds” brought the multitalented Collins a multitude of fan recognition.

But Collins, one of only three recording artists to sell 100 million albums worldwide,

regrets the outcome of his success and the impact it has had on the world of music.

He said, "I'm sorry that it was all so successful. I honestly didn't mean it to happen like that," adding,

"It's hardly surprising that people grew to hate me."

Collins has battled several health issues over the past decade, including dislocated vertebra and nerve damage in his hands.

His ability to hear has decreased drastically as a result of playing so many live shows,

and the afflictions to his hands make it impossible for him to play the drums.

But his physical problems aren’t what pushed Collins out of music.

He doesn’t like what the industry has become.

"I look at the MTV Music Awards and I think: 'I can't be in the same business as this,’” he said.

He added, "I'm much happier to write myself out of the script entirely."

[img:$uid]http://static-p-a.comcast.net/api/assets/cimed-20110304/phil-collins.jpg[/img:$uid]

Who are the other two? I thought surely there was more than that? I'm guessing Michael Jackson and ......?

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Reply #19 posted 03/05/11 3:38am

mynameisnotsus
an

Arnotts said:

HuMpThAnG said:

Collins, who has made a mark on the musical world as a drummer, pianist, and singer, said,

"I don't think anyone's going to miss me."

The 60-year-old rock and roll veteran began his long career as the drummer for Genesis.

The band quickly gained fame and Collins skyrocketed into superstardom.

Singles like “In the Air Tonight” and “Against All Odds” brought the multitalented Collins a multitude of fan recognition.

But Collins, one of only three recording artists to sell 100 million albums worldwide,

regrets the outcome of his success and the impact it has had on the world of music.

He said, "I'm sorry that it was all so successful. I honestly didn't mean it to happen like that," adding,

"It's hardly surprising that people grew to hate me."

Collins has battled several health issues over the past decade, including dislocated vertebra and nerve damage in his hands.

His ability to hear has decreased drastically as a result of playing so many live shows,

and the afflictions to his hands make it impossible for him to play the drums.

But his physical problems aren’t what pushed Collins out of music.

He doesn’t like what the industry has become.

"I look at the MTV Music Awards and I think: 'I can't be in the same business as this,’” he said.

He added, "I'm much happier to write myself out of the script entirely."

[img:$uid]http://static-p-a.comcast.net/api/assets/cimed-20110304/phil-collins.jpg[/img:$uid]

Who are the other two? I thought surely there was more than that? I'm guessing Michael Jackson and ......?

The Sun f**ked up the info (surprise surprise). They meant this from wiki.

Collins is one of only three recording artists (along with Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson) who have sold over 100 million albums worldwide both as solo artists and (separately) as principal members of a band.

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Reply #20 posted 03/05/11 3:46am

mynameisnotsus
an

This 'poor me' exit is so dismissive of the millions and millions of people who have bought his music and supported his career. Truly strange.

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Reply #21 posted 03/05/11 4:12am

MattyJam

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The title of this thread is hilarious.

As for Collins, this is exactly the kind of smug, poor-little-rich-boy attitude that made everyone think he was a royal tit in the first place.

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Reply #22 posted 03/05/11 4:29am

BklynBabe

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Awww, I liked Phil Collins! I say if Ice T likes you, you may be the shit!
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Reply #23 posted 03/05/11 4:38am

JoeTyler

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It's OK Phil comfort

the crap you released since 1985 cannot overshadow your work during the 70's and early 80's

tinkerbell
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Reply #24 posted 03/05/11 4:54am

IstenSzek

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i read an interview with him a while back where he talked about being severely depressed

and even contemplating suicide.

now, i've always hated phil collins smile but reading that immediately warmed me up to him

and even made me feel sorry for him. depression is something you don't wish on anyone

and i hope he's not sinking deeper into it.

and true love lives on lollipops and crisps
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Reply #25 posted 03/05/11 5:10am

SEANMAN

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SAY IT AIN'T SO PHIL!!!!!!!!!!!!!! YOU ARE LOVED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

"Get up off that grey line"
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Reply #26 posted 03/05/11 5:13am

dirtyman2005

in the air tonight + miami vice = legend

fuck all the haters.

he might have done shit after 1985. but he created the soundtrack song nobody can touch

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Reply #27 posted 03/05/11 5:18am

rialb

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Se7en said:

There really are 2 distinctly different musical worlds right now.

The first one is absolute shit . . . this includes what's on radio, what's on MTV, what's popular on YouTube and the Top 100 on iTunes. It's really all just pop divas, (c)rap, generic R&B and soundalike country. Really, consider Phil Collins in the company of Britney/Rihanna/Pink/Lady GaGa/Eminem/Lil Wayne/Chris Brown/Usher/Taylor Swift/etc. and you can see where he's coming from.

The second musical world . . . you're not going to really hear about it. Hundreds of "legacy" acts release new albums every year, but you won't hear them on the radio or see them on TV. If you're a follower, you'll probably know about their new album directly from them. It's actually very sad that REAL music is missing from the airwaves and TV. Compare Phil Collins to other peers who are also in this group: Bruce Springsteen/Peter Gabriel/Robert Plant/Bob Dylan/Tom Petty/etc.

Imagine if Paul Simon released a new album this year . . . you might have about a 5% chance of hearing about it, but a 95% chance hearing about Britney Spears. There is something really wrong with that!

Phil was always an anomaly. In the '80s did he really "fit" with Michael Jackson/Madonna/Prince/Culture Club/George Michael (Wham)/Duran Duran/Whiney Houston/Janet Jackson et cetera?

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Reply #28 posted 03/05/11 5:21am

Nick715

That makes me sad. I grew up on 80's music as did most of you. Loved his work with Genesis and as a solo artist. Hey Phil, the current music industry is what you should be embarassed about!

Can I get an amen?

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Reply #29 posted 03/05/11 5:31am

Militant

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There was a point where he became the medias favorite punching bag. As the article says - it was in the 90's when all of a sudden if you weren't edgy or alternative, then you just weren't cool or credible. For whatever reason he bore the brunt of it.

To this day - in the UK at least - you bring up his name and people just laugh.

For me - he has a bunch of great songs and that's all that matters. I don't care about anything else.

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Forums > Music: Non-Prince > Phil Collins Quits, Apologizes For Career