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Reply #90 posted 06/23/09 2:21pm

MrSoulpower

brooksie said:

40s or 50s (hot damn)...AND male? Damn...female and mid 30s, folks. LOL....I'm not even as old as Vainandy and a chick....now I'm REALLY amused!

Shit....y'all a trip! lol


lol You presented yourself as someone who's older, and a whole bunch of posters here perceived it that way. That doesn't come from nowhere. You were talking about youngsters and the young generation in a tone that set yourself aside from them, like referring to those here who love old Funk as "such kids". Go back and read your posts, and maybe you'll understand what I mean.
I'm in my mid-30s, so why would you call me "kid" when we're the same age?

Now regarding your gender - you're right. I'm guilty as charged. Funk is such a male dominated genre, you'll find very few females who'll join a debate with as much passion and knowledge as you did. So forgive me for mistaking you for a male.
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Reply #91 posted 06/23/09 2:23pm

brooksie

avatar

MrSoulpower You ask me why I'm so analytical, but you've already analized my age, gender, and my record collection based on a few posts?

It's actually a simple question from my PoV...I knew what the big sounds were gonna be even when I was a kid. The era had many distinct artists who were gonna be listened to and making moves years later. This site is prime example of such an artist. Part of the reason why I knew is because all of the genres we're discussing were being played in mainstream formats. We knew fully well where early samples came from cuz our parents had it and we could hear it on the dial. IOW, we heard the old and saw it incorproated into the new.

So of the people NOW, either mainstream or obscure, who will have the X.org site like we have here?
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Reply #92 posted 06/23/09 2:23pm

vainandy

avatar

brooksie said:

vainandy said:



You can say that again! Talk about labels having a double standard. If you flip through the radio stations, you'll find some kind of new rock. It may be a bunch of loud grinding guitars with a bunch of yelling on top of it but it's still rock and it's still on the radio. Try looking for some new funk of any kind on the radio. You ain't gonna find it.



This is TRUTH. The fact that you have to search for it is outrageous. The fact that 60+ year old guys can put out new material in one genre and get play while any acts w/ a certain sound CAN'T is problematic. Black music has been reduced to hip hop in the mainstream, as you well know. wink It's amazing that rnb was so diverse at one time and it's come down to this, either listen to hip hop OR spend your time searching for obscure music online. Most folks will just dig in their collections and call it a day. It's depressing! lol


I'm constantly buying music but it's always old music that I'm buying. It would be nice to buy some good new music from the record store like I used to. Hell, I used to get a lot of the jams before the radio stations got them.
Andy is a four letter word.
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Reply #93 posted 06/23/09 2:24pm

paisleypark4

avatar

vainandy said:

paisleypark4 said:

I can give a cotton picking if the clubs don't play it anymore..as long as they still play some uptempo songs like Beyonce, Missy etc. (as they do in Minneapolis / I leave when the mid-tempo hip hop stuff come on).


I don't want to hear those folks either. lol

and hell if I sit and listen to old music all day in the basement acting as if the world ended like some ol' hag.


I do that damn near every Friday and Saturday night except I'm listening to it and drinking with my brother (who could really care less what music is playing because he just wants to drink and hang out). I have basically left the club scene altogether. But I'm getting sick of it because you can't get no dick that way and my brother doesn't turn me on. lol



falloff
falloff

ONLY YOU baby, only you! But I understand....I know by the time I get up to the 40's I will have an extremly extensive body of music to listen to so that when the clubs get old I can have too much to play. Im taking you have a huge range.
Download all the shit hop that you can for your kids, neices, nephews, and their friends also. That will prevent them from going out and buying it and will prevent some shit hop sales. Every little bit helps - Andy
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemus
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Reply #94 posted 06/23/09 2:26pm

brooksie

avatar

MrSoulpower said:

brooksie said:

40s or 50s (hot damn)...AND male? Damn...female and mid 30s, folks. LOL....I'm not even as old as Vainandy and a chick....now I'm REALLY amused!

Shit....y'all a trip! lol


lol You presented yourself as someone who's older, and a whole bunch of posters here perceived it that way. That doesn't come from nowhere. You were talking about youngsters and the young generation in a tone that set yourself aside from them, like referring to those here who love old Funk as "such kids". Go back and read your posts, and maybe you'll understand what I mean.
I'm in my mid-30s, so why would you call me "kid" when we're the same age?

Now regarding your gender - you're right. I'm guilty as charged. Funk is such a male dominated genre, you'll find very few females who'll join a debate with as much passion and knowledge as you did. So forgive me for mistaking you for a male.


You don't act like it. Most people as old as we are shouldn't take shit so personally that's not aimed at them personally.

You guys inserted the generation stuff, so own it.

There's a reason why women don't get involved w/ music convos, let me tell ya.
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Reply #95 posted 06/23/09 2:32pm

vainandy

avatar

Timmy84 said:

Damn, we got a real generational gap here. wink

The younger ones are the ones searching and enjoying new shit, the older ones: "the hell y'all searching? Music's dead."

lol

Least we ain't listening to NoSoulJaIdiot! SUPAMAN THAT ASS ON OUTTA HERE! cool


That's because we had it good growing up and didn't have to search for good music. It was all over the radio and came to us. And if we heard a song that was a jam, we could go to the record store and it was in there. We didn't have to order it and wait for it to arrive. I grew up having good new music at my fingertips whenever I wanted it because the record store was in walking distance. Hell, you could search every record store in town nowadays and not come out with a damn thing unless it's something old that you've heard for years.

Mainstream music is total bullshit but people y'all's age are really lucky because you are hearing all that old music for the first time so new to your ears. Us older folks, on the other hand, have heard it for years. Yeah, we enjoy finding something old and rare that we didn't already have but we'd much rather have something new that we've never heard of before that is actually good music instead of some stripped down midtempo shit hop or adult contemporary R&B ballad or even some uptempo music with a shit hopper on it. I've come to despise shit hop so much these days for what it's done to the mainstream that I don't even want to hear it uptempo. I want it out of style and a new style to come about.
Andy is a four letter word.
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Reply #96 posted 06/23/09 2:34pm

paisleypark4

avatar

brooksie said:



There's a reason why women don't get involved w/ music convos, let me tell ya.



I know, Im waiting. Im wondering why Teena Marie, Missy and Beyonce are basically the only females in the mainstream that have had a hand in producing their own music. Lack of knowledge? hmmm
Download all the shit hop that you can for your kids, neices, nephews, and their friends also. That will prevent them from going out and buying it and will prevent some shit hop sales. Every little bit helps - Andy
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemus
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Reply #97 posted 06/23/09 2:34pm

MrSoulpower

brooksie said:

MrSoulpower You ask me why I'm so analytical, but you've already analized my age, gender, and my record collection based on a few posts?

It's actually a simple question from my PoV...I knew what the big sounds were gonna be even when I was a kid. The era had many distinct artists who were gonna be listened to and making moves years later. This site is prime example of such an artist. Part of the reason why I knew is because all of the genres we're discussing were being played in mainstream formats. We knew fully well where early samples came from cuz our parents had it and we could hear it on the dial. IOW, we heard the old and saw it incorproated into the new.

So of the people NOW, either mainstream or obscure, who will have the X.org site like we have here?


First, I wasn't being analytical. It was a pure observation.
I'm saying you're overly analytical because, at least going by your posts, the way you feel music comes second to what you think music should be like today. I think that's over analyzing things that really don't matter - to me. Maybe they matter to you.

Second, I don't care about what X.org our kids will be having. I don't need a website dedicated to one artist. I'm not even a Prince fan, and you'll never see me post in the Prince forum. There are enough forums for fans of oldschool Funk and Soul music that are not tied to one artist. We don't need no musical superstars. We just need good music.

Third, the fact that the Funk movement is underground today automatically eliminates the possibility of a X.org dedicated to a Funk artist. And that's perfectly fine with me. I'm looking for artists who will keep the old grooves alive. There are only a handful of old Soul legends who make music today like they used to back in the 1960s, with the same raw energy. Without the new bands, which reproduce the old sound, future generations will never know what music like this feels like when performed live. But if you go see a show by Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings, you'll get an idea of what it was like back in 1967 at the Apollo Theater.
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Reply #98 posted 06/23/09 2:36pm

vainandy

avatar

brooksie said:

Yes, we have a generation gap because I wonder why such young kids are so content w/ holding on to the past...someone else's past?! Why don't you find something new rather than hanging on to stuff that came from a time and place that has little to do w/ you? Honestly, this is why music is stuck in a rut. Talking about lazy, sitting around listening to shit online by yourself is the exactly what lazy is. Sorry folks, little that is both NEW and GOOD will come from this attitude. shrug


It's not the past to them because they've never heard it before or grew up with it on a daily basis like we have so it's new to them. I'm glad some of them are listening to the older music because maybe it will influence a few of them who are musicians to release some good music. Although, it's probably hopeless though because if they jam, they would never get a record deal these days let alone radio airplay.
Andy is a four letter word.
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Reply #99 posted 06/23/09 2:42pm

uPtoWnNY

vainandy said:

That's because we had it good growing up and didn't have to search for good music.



Exactly. Hell, I grew up on my father's record collection. He had everything(Nat King Cole, Sinatra, Nina Simone, Cannonball Adderly, all the Motown/Atlantic/Stax hits, etc., etc.) That was a HUGE influence on me and my brother.
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Reply #100 posted 06/23/09 2:42pm

MrSoulpower

brooksie said:



You don't act like it. Most people as old as we are shouldn't take shit so personally that's not aimed at them personally.

You guys inserted the generation stuff, so own it.

There's a reason why women don't get involved w/ music convos, let me tell ya.


I don't act like it? I take shit personally? falloff As far as I remember, I did not send you a private message, accusing you of disrespecting me. You send me such message. So please don't act like I'm the one who takes matters personal, okay? Because I don't. I couldn't care less if you like the New Funk artists or not. I don't take offense to that.
The discussion that you and I had in the first place was over your claim that Funk is dead. And by the way, you have not returned to the initial thread with this discussion. But no worried, I don't take that personal. wink

The fact remains, I wasn't the only one who believed you were older, others felt the same way. I don't know you, all I can go by is what I read in your posts. And your posts seemed to be condescending towards those "young kids" who are now into Funk. Is it really surprising that someone would draw the conclusion that you're a bit older than mid-30s, especially after you called me "kid"? So why not take it as a compliment? After all, no one guessed your age based on a picture you posted.
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Reply #101 posted 06/23/09 2:45pm

brooksie

avatar

vainandy said:



It's not the past to them because they've never heard it before or grew up with it on a daily basis like we have so it's new to them. I'm glad some of them are listening to the older music because maybe it will influence a few of them who are musicians to release some good music. Although, it's probably hopeless though because if they jam, they would never get a record deal these days let alone radio airplay.


Funny thing is, I didn't live thru the BEST years of funk, IMHO. Mine was more Roger and Gapp, but the 60s and 70s had banging jams. I heard the older stuff, but the current stuff was like Dazz.

This part is the saddest part. I'm just wondering what mainstream popular music will influence the future? Hopefully, people will get tired of these platic sounds and go for something more real. In terms of Black popular music, it really bothers me that instrumentation is almost extinct.

As I said to you in another thread, I feel a change in the air. People are tired of autotune, drum machines, and canned tracks. Time for BANDS again. lol
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Reply #102 posted 06/23/09 2:47pm

MrSoulpower

brooksie said:


This part is the saddest part. I'm just wondering what mainstream popular music will influence the future? Hopefully, people will get tired of these platic sounds and go for something more real. In terms of Black popular music, it really bothers me that instrumentation is almost extinct.

As I said to you in another thread, I feel a change in the air. People are tired of autotune, drum machines, and canned tracks. Time for BANDS again. lol


Now that I agree with. Which is why I don't understand why you can't feel new Funk artists picking up instruments, making real music. Isn't that what you want as well?
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Reply #103 posted 06/23/09 2:50pm

paisleypark4

avatar

vainandy said:



It's not the past to them because they've never heard it before or grew up with it on a daily basis like we have so it's new to them. I'm glad some of them are listening to the older music because maybe it will influence a few of them who are musicians to release some good music. Although, it's probably hopeless though because if they jam, they would never get a record deal these days let alone radio airplay.




Well i cant say wnything to that..you are right. It did help Amy Winehouse, Joss Stone to get recognition.. and Solange did a 60's 70's album....Saadiq did too...
Download all the shit hop that you can for your kids, neices, nephews, and their friends also. That will prevent them from going out and buying it and will prevent some shit hop sales. Every little bit helps - Andy
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemus
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Reply #104 posted 06/23/09 2:51pm

vainandy

avatar

MrSoulpower said:

Because it's great fuckin' music!! What's wrong with sticking with what you think is best?
Who are you to judge that nothing GOOD will come out of this when a whole new generation of Funk fans would strongly disagree with you? Is your judgment the ultimate rule on the legacy of Funk? You don't sound like you're too happy with music, man.
See, it's exactly your attitude that is the reason why Funk is not appreciated as much here in the States. You're trying too hard to constantly find something new that you forget how precious and beautiful the old thing is.


Whether it's good or not (which is a matter of taste), why should you have to search for it? That's the problem here. We didn't have to search for it in the past and we shouldn't have to now.

And I'm all for change as long as it's good change. Yeah, I'm the one that was pissed when Shitney Houston changed things for the worst. Had she changed things for the better, I wouldn't have said one word. So yeah, I understand what it's like to want to stick with something that's great also and not have change. I fully understand both sides.


What's next? Shall I leave my wife because there are many new chicks to bone? Or do I stay with her because I love her and she makes me feel like no one else does?


Hey, speak for yourself. But when I go looking for dick, I would prefer to get one that I've never had before every single time I get some dick. What can I say, I'm a whore. lol Yeah, I go back to some of the same ones on a regular basis but there's nothing like having a new one for the first time, pulling down that zipper, and not knowing what it's going to look like before it flops out. lol
Andy is a four letter word.
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Reply #105 posted 06/23/09 2:58pm

MrSoulpower

vainandy said:


Whether it's good or not (which is a matter of taste), why should you have to search for it? That's the problem here. We didn't have to search for it in the past and we shouldn't have to now.


Yes, you had to search for it in the past. I would guarantee you that most of the old Funk and Soul that I play, you have never heard before in your life. You would have had to look hard to find it. And today that's even easier than back in the 1960s, because today you have the internet, podcasts and YouTube. So Funk collectors today have an advantage that people back in the day didn't have.
I started collecting in the early 90s. It was impossible to get some of the rare records on my want list, but today, I have a better chance, because they may come up on Ebay. See my point?

But I agree with you on the mainstream. Back in the day, mainstream music was much better. However, that has little to do with accessibility.
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Reply #106 posted 06/23/09 3:50pm

vainandy

avatar

MrSoulpower said:

vainandy said:


Whether it's good or not (which is a matter of taste), why should you have to search for it? That's the problem here. We didn't have to search for it in the past and we shouldn't have to now.


Yes, you had to search for it in the past. I would guarantee you that most of the old Funk and Soul that I play, you have never heard before in your life. You would have had to look hard to find it. And today that's even easier than back in the 1960s, because today you have the internet, podcasts and YouTube. So Funk collectors today have an advantage that people back in the day didn't have.
I started collecting in the early 90s. It was impossible to get some of the rare records on my want list, but today, I have a better chance, because they may come up on Ebay. See my point?
But I agree with you on the mainstream. Back in the day, mainstream music was much better. However, that has little to do with accessibility.


That's because you started collecting it in the 1990s when that type of music was already out of style. Hell, you would have had a hard time finding those records on your list in the early 80s or even during the disco era because the type of funk that you like was already out of style. Hell, back in those days, things moved fast and the majority of artists put out a new album every year. Once that artist had a new album out, it was hard to find their previous album unless they were a huge star like Prince or Michael Jackson. Once those songs went out of style, the record store didn't order any more copies of them.

But I guarantee you, had you bought those records when they were brand new, in style, and getting radio airplay, they would have been very easy to find in most any record store. I have all kinds of 12 Inches and 45s from totally forgotten groups from the early 80s that weren't even huge back then such as Glass, Warp 9, Project Future, Sunrize, Goodie, etc. but those records were in full stock in the record stores when they were brand new. You can't say the same about obscure groups today. Those groups aren't even in the record stores even when they are brand new, let alone out of style. However, those obscure jams from back then were getting regular airplay so somebody (like myself) was likely to buy it if the record store kept it in stock. That's the difference.

I started buying records in 1978 and the majority of my vinyl, I bought it when it was brand new. And I have lots of stuff that is considered obscure these days and had no problem finding it when it was brand new.
.
.
.
[Edited 6/23/09 15:53pm]
Andy is a four letter word.
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Reply #107 posted 06/23/09 4:08pm

vainandy

avatar

paisleypark4 said:

I know by the time I get up to the 40's I will have an extremly extensive body of music to listen to so that when the clubs get old I can have too much to play. Im taking you have a huge range.


I kept all my music from back in the day and will never part with it. I started out buying the latest disco. Then I started buying the latest funk of the day and also the latest rap jams of the day (the funky ones that people have labelled "electro" these days, not the slow shit hop ones). Then I started buying house/dance music in the late 80s through the mid 1990s. When acid trance took over house music and shit hop took over R&B, that's when I started going backwards and buying 70s funk that I had not bought earlier because I was too young and didn't start buying funk till the year 1980 after disco died. Then when I got a huge collection of that funk, then I started buying a lot of 80s pop/rock, hard rock, and some heavy metal. I've always moved forward and never moved backwards until shit hop made things unbearable. Hell, I've even got some country in my collection. Now, I've even got Count Basie's "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy Of Company B".

I have definately expanded my tastes a lot since the days when I only listened to the latest disco, funk, house, or any other funky type of dance music. It's when there was nothing good that was new, that I was forced to explore other forms of music so I know exactly why you explore older music yourself even though a lot of it was before your time. I don't just adjust to bullshit because that's all there is. I drop it all together and go out kicking and screaming. But to just not listen to the mainstream isn't enough. I've got to shit all up and down, backwards and forwards, and sideways all over it. Hell, if the motherfuckers can't enterain me musically, I can at least get entertainment out of shitting on them. Hell, they're entertainers right? Well, I'm going to be entertained by them one way or another. lol
Andy is a four letter word.
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Reply #108 posted 06/23/09 6:29pm

MrSoulpower

vainandy said:


But I guarantee you, had you bought those records when they were brand new, in style, and getting radio airplay, they would have been very easy to find in most any record store.

Nope ... the records that I'm talking about are mainly regional releases, with 800 or less pressings. Funk was a huge underground movement back in the late 1960s, and most releases by small indie labels didn't make it beyond a consignment deal of a local record store. It was almost impossible for collectors to get those records back in the day, and believe me, I know quite a few who were around then.

I have all kinds of 12 Inches and 45s from totally forgotten groups from the early 80s that weren't even huge back then such as Glass, Warp 9, Project Future, Sunrize, Goodie, etc. but those records were in full stock in the record stores when they were brand new.

Once again, the era that I talk about, you would not have seen them in your store, because for 90 percent of these records, there was no distribution.
Check out this Rare Funk radio show I did a few weeks ago, showing off some of my rarest shit. No more than 5 percent of these records had national distribution, and it would have been impossible for a guy from Mississippi to find a rare, independent release from Ohio, for example.

http://wrir.org/x/modules...oryid=9784


You can't say the same about obscure groups today. Those groups aren't even in the record stores even when they are brand new, let alone out of style. However, those obscure jams from back then were getting regular airplay so somebody (like myself) was likely to buy it if the record store kept it in stock. That's the difference.

The records I talk about didn't get national airplay. That's what made them obscure. But today, collectors and DJs all over the world know about them. Back in the day, only local DJs were hip to them, and that's it.


I started buying records in 1978 and the majority of my vinyl, I bought it when it was brand new. And I have lots of stuff that is considered obscure these days and had no problem finding it when it was brand new.

lol Bro, by 1978, the true Funk movement (of artists releasing dirty, lowdown and organic 45s on small, underground labels) had been over for at least five years. You're talking of a waaaay later era, while I am talking about the early days of Funk, when most Funk 45s were recorded.

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Reply #109 posted 06/23/09 7:21pm

IAintTheOne

MrSoulpower said:

vainandy said:


But I guarantee you, had you bought those records when they were brand new, in style, and getting radio airplay, they would have been very easy to find in most any record store.

Nope ... the records that I'm talking about are mainly regional releases, with 800 or less pressings. Funk was a huge underground movement back in the late 1960s, and most releases by small indie labels didn't make it beyond a consignment deal of a local record store. It was almost impossible for collectors to get those records back in the day, and believe me, I know quite a few who were around then.

I have all kinds of 12 Inches and 45s from totally forgotten groups from the early 80s that weren't even huge back then such as Glass, Warp 9, Project Future, Sunrize, Goodie, etc. but those records were in full stock in the record stores when they were brand new.


I
Once again, the era that I talk about, you would not have seen them in your store, because for 90 percent of these records, there was no distribution.
Check out this Rare Funk radio show I did a few weeks ago, showing off some of my rarest shit. No more than 5 percent of these records had national distribution, and it would have been impossible for a guy from Mississippi to find a rare, independent release from Ohio, for example.

http://wrir.org/x/modules...oryid=9784


You can't say the same about obscure groups today. Those groups aren't even in the record stores even when they are brand new, let alone out of style. However, those obscure jams from back then were getting regular airplay so somebody (like myself) was likely to buy it if the record store kept it in stock. That's the difference.

The records I talk about didn't get national airplay. That's what made them obscure. But today, collectors and DJs all over the world know about them. Back in the day, only local DJs were hip to them, and that's it.


I started buying records in 1978 and the majority of my vinyl, I bought it when it was brand new. And I have lots of stuff that is considered obscure these days and had no problem finding it when it was brand new.

lol Bro, by 1978, the true Funk movement (of artists releasing dirty, lowdown and organic 45s on small, underground labels) had been over for at least five years. You're talking of a waaaay later era, while I am talking about the early days of Funk, when most Funk 45s were recorded.


I know Pari and we've had some deep discussion on the way to the vinyl dig. I thought I was a bad cat but this cat knows his shit simple. I love y'all I do But what I am trying to convey here is that this cat did his research and studied his shit for discussions like this. If you saw his 45 collection or even 1 of his 45 boxes trust me you'd shit in your pants twice.
[Edited 6/23/09 19:21pm]
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Reply #110 posted 06/24/09 5:23am

MrSoulpower

IAintTheOne said:

I know Pari and we've had some deep discussion on the way to the vinyl dig. I thought I was a bad cat but this cat knows his shit simple. I love y'all I do But what I am trying to convey here is that this cat did his research and studied his shit for discussions like this. If you saw his 45 collection or even 1 of his 45 boxes trust me you'd shit in your pants twice.
[Edited 6/23/09 19:21pm]


I appreciate the kudos, man. lol But that's exactly what I'm talking about. Collecting Funk records is a science, especially when it comes to 45s. There is just so much out there, it's unbelievable. Back in the day, as a collector, it would have been impossible to get at least an idea of 10% that's out there.
Today, we have the internet. DJs and collectors are well connected, and every new discovery is shared with everyone else. Which is why I don't own every super rare record, but I know most of them, and because of file sharing, I have actually heard them.

I love me some Vainandy, but he's totally off track if he believes that back in the 60s or 70s, you could have simply walked into a store and bought every Funk 45 out there. This leads us back to the original discussion - even back in the day, Funk was deep underground, except for a few artists who went mainstream and whose records had national distribution. To most Funk artists, the concept of national distribution and even a royalty check was foreign. They would have their latest single pressed with a small local independent label, maybe 200 or 500 of them, and then go to local DJs to hustle them or put them on consignment in local record stores. These songs never, ever became hits back in the day - but today, young Funk fans fron all over the world dance to these tunes in clubs, and DJs pay horrendeous amounts of money for these records.
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Reply #111 posted 06/24/09 5:28am

IAintTheOne

MrSoulpower said:

IAintTheOne said:

I know Pari and we've had some deep discussion on the way to the vinyl dig. I thought I was a bad cat but this cat knows his shit simple. I love y'all I do But what I am trying to convey here is that this cat did his research and studied his shit for discussions like this. If you saw his 45 collection or even 1 of his 45 boxes trust me you'd shit in your pants twice.
[Edited 6/23/09 19:21pm]


I appreciate the kudos, man. lol But that's exactly what I'm talking about. Collecting Funk records is a science, especially when it comes to 45s. There is just so much out there, it's unbelievable. Back in the day, as a collector, it would have been impossible to get at least an idea of 10% that's out there.
Today, we have the internet. DJs and collectors are well connected, and every new discovery is shared with everyone else. Which is why I don't own every super rare record, but I know most of them, and because of file sharing, I have actually heard them.

I love me some Vainandy, but he's totally off track if he believes that back in the 60s or 70s, you could have simply walked into a store and bought every Funk 45 out there. This leads us back to the original discussion - even back in the day, Funk was deep underground, except for a few artists who went mainstream and whose records had national distribution. To most Funk artists, the concept of national distribution and even a royalty check was foreign. They would have their latest single pressed with a small local independent label, maybe 200 or 500 of them, and then go to local DJs to hustle them or put them on consignment in local record stores. These songs never, ever became hits back in the day - but today, young Funk fans fron all over the world dance to these tunes in clubs, and DJs pay horrendeous amounts of money for these records.


Lmao I know man I used to be record hustler and I know what its all about man it is not easy. a lot of these records have gone unnoticed by radio and what not. So many good records ended up by the wayside because of this. BTW I saw what Felty is selling on ebay. Holy shit 20.00 for that Manhattans on bell? kinda cheap eh?
[Edited 6/24/09 5:29am]
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Reply #112 posted 06/24/09 5:31am

Timmy84

Yeah and there's tons of music from back then that you NEVER hear EVER and the discovery of these tracks is amazing to me and even more amazing is how overlooked some of those 45's you mention, Pari, be it funk, rock or soul by music artists, lol.
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Reply #113 posted 06/24/09 5:31am

MrSoulpower

IAintTheOne said:

BTW I saw what Felty is selling on ebay. Holy shit 20.00 for that Manhattans on bell? kinda cheap eh?


Felty is always reasonable. He'd never rip someone off.

I have a list of records coming for you as well. Just didn't have the time to grade them.
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Reply #114 posted 06/24/09 5:33am

MrSoulpower

Timmy84 said:

Yeah and there's tons of music from back then that you NEVER hear EVER and the discovery of these tracks is amazing to me and even more amazing is how overlooked some of those 45's you mention, Pari, be it funk, rock or soul by music artists, lol.


Absolutely, which is why it gives me hope that people now have interest in artists who didn't know how to pay their bills back in the day, but today, fans all over the world make it happen to bring these artists back, be it for new recordings or on stage.

Funk isn't dead. Funk is more widespread and alive than ever.
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Reply #115 posted 06/24/09 5:34am

IAintTheOne

MrSoulpower said:

IAintTheOne said:

BTW I saw what Felty is selling on ebay. Holy shit 20.00 for that Manhattans on bell? kinda cheap eh?


Felty is always reasonable. He'd never rip someone off.

I have a list of records coming for you as well. Just didn't have the time to grade them.



grade? Shit I trust you you know that but you being a perfectionist i'll wait for you to grade em.
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Reply #116 posted 06/24/09 5:39am

MrSoulpower

IAintTheOne said:

MrSoulpower said:



Felty is always reasonable. He'd never rip someone off.

I have a list of records coming for you as well. Just didn't have the time to grade them.



grade? Shit I trust you you know that but you being a perfectionist i'll wait for you to grade em.


I grade them so I know how I can price them, dude. lol
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Reply #117 posted 06/24/09 6:33am

IAintTheOne

MrSoulpower said:

IAintTheOne said:




grade? Shit I trust you you know that but you being a perfectionist i'll wait for you to grade em.


I grade them so I know how I can price them, dude. lol


Lmao I know man. im fuckin witcha biggrin
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Reply #118 posted 06/24/09 10:50am

paisleypark4

avatar

Timmy84 said:

Yeah and there's tons of music from back then that you NEVER hear EVER and the discovery of these tracks is amazing to me and even more amazing is how overlooked some of those 45's you mention, Pari, be it funk, rock or soul by music artists, lol.



Its a never ending search to find dirty gritty hardcore funk.
Download all the shit hop that you can for your kids, neices, nephews, and their friends also. That will prevent them from going out and buying it and will prevent some shit hop sales. Every little bit helps - Andy
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemus
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Reply #119 posted 06/24/09 2:47pm

MrSoulpower

paisleypark4 said:

Timmy84 said:

Yeah and there's tons of music from back then that you NEVER hear EVER and the discovery of these tracks is amazing to me and even more amazing is how overlooked some of those 45's you mention, Pari, be it funk, rock or soul by music artists, lol.



Its a never ending search to find dirty gritty hardcore funk.


Tell me about it. And ask my wife how she feels about my out of control spending. lol

But my point was, it's so much easier to find the rare records these days - and to find out about them in the first place. I don't like to buy of Ebay, and I rarely do it (only if it's a record that I know I won't find out diggin'). I prefer traditional record hunts at thrift stores, flea markets, warehouses or talking widows into selling the collections of their recently deceased husbands. lol
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