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Thread started 01/09/17 12:58pm

thebanishedone

Larry Blackmoon from Cameo dissing Prince in a 1986 interview?

In

Cameo Fights Funk Image

interview Larry said
I could name names but I won't," he said. "You know who I'm talking about anyway. It's like, now they have all that money, they can forget they're black. They don't have to worry about money. They could say and do a lot of things for black people but they don't. All of them would be nowhere without that black base audience that gave them a start.

"One guy in particular I used to hang out with when he had nothing. I remember when he was playing bars on Seventh Avenue (in New York). Now he's big and all of a sudden very white. That bothers me."

This interview was from 1986.Prince played in New York Ritz club in 1981

and Prince was accused around that time for selling out to white audiance so was he talking about Prince?

[Edited 1/9/17 12:59pm]

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Reply #1 posted 01/09/17 1:19pm

RJOrion

thebanishedone said:

In


Cameo Fights Funk Image


interview Larry said

I could name names but I won't," he said. "You know who I'm talking about anyway. It's like, now they have all that money, they can forget they're black. They don't have to worry about money. They could say and do a lot of things for black people but they don't. All of them would be nowhere without that black base audience that gave them a start.


"One guy in particular I used to hang out with when he had nothing. I remember when he was playing bars on Seventh Avenue (in New York). Now he's big and all of a sudden very white. That bothers me."



This interview was from 1986.Prince played in New York Ritz club in 1981


and Prince was accused around that time for selling out to white audiance so was he talking about Prince?


[Edited 1/9/17 12:59pm]




nah...i doubt it....Larry Blackmon has been on record saying him and P were real cool...John Blackwell even came from Cameo's camp
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Reply #2 posted 01/09/17 1:29pm

thebanishedone

RJOrion said:

thebanishedone said:

In

Cameo Fights Funk Image

interview Larry said
I could name names but I won't," he said. "You know who I'm talking about anyway. It's like, now they have all that money, they can forget they're black. They don't have to worry about money. They could say and do a lot of things for black people but they don't. All of them would be nowhere without that black base audience that gave them a start.

"One guy in particular I used to hang out with when he had nothing. I remember when he was playing bars on Seventh Avenue (in New York). Now he's big and all of a sudden very white. That bothers me."

This interview was from 1986.Prince played in New York Ritz club in 1981

and Prince was accused around that time for selling out to white audiance so was he talking about Prince?

[Edited 1/9/17 12:59pm]

nah...i doubt it....Larry Blackmon has been on record saying him and P were real cool...John Blackwell even came from Cameo's camp

remember this was in 1986 maybe they were cool latter

princve was friend with Slash and Axl latter in life but u cant say they were friends during the 1991 mtv incident

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Reply #3 posted 01/09/17 1:31pm

KoolEaze

avatar

When you say selling out ....are you referring to the year 1981, when he played at the Ritz in New York, or 1986, when this interview took place?

I don´t agree with Larry Blackmon (his name is Blackmon, not Blackmoon) but I understand where he´s coming from....he does have a point even though I don´t necessarily agree with him because I felt the same way about Prince in 1986, and I wasn´t the only one (orger VainAndy might agree with me if he reads this).

Remember that scene in UTCM where Christopher has a nightmare of a rather big , black woman? Even some of his later friends such as Spike Lee found that scene a bit odd, to say the least.

Also , he was more of a pop act at that time than a Funk act but when he started most people thought he was a Funk (and to some extent P-Funk and Funk Rock, RnB) act. But with the Revolution, especially Lisa and Wendy, he became more of a pop phenomenon than part of black music.

That´s also when you´d find his albums in the pop section and no longer in the Funk shelves at record stores, and keep in mind that he kept his racial background a bit vague in the mid 80s.

.

I said I don´t necessarily agree with Larry because I´m sure that Prince , deep in his heart but also in his actions and views, was always part of black and Funk culture, but he also knew that he could transcend such boundaries.

Remember when he became "blacker" during the Parade tour because he made Wally and Greg part of the extended Revolution and Lisa and Wendy, especially Wendy, were quite pissed about it and Wendy said something in the vein of "We could have become the next Beatles .....instead of this".

I love Wendy and Lisa and their contributions, and sure, they created some magic with Prince but I also understand why they probably started getting on Prince´s nerves.

Hell, to this day, I´ve yet to see a Wendy interview where she does not make some sort of snarky, critical comment about Prince....even after his death (see that latest Revolution interview where she just HAD to mention that Lisa was a much more accomplished pianist than Prince....was that really necesssary? ) .

But I digress.....don´t get me wrong, I really like that era and the Revolution and Wendy but I also understand why there was potential for tension.

.

Remember how the critics blasted Prince in the mid to late 80s for being oh so European, for playing more often in Europe than in the USA, for sounding "too white", "too pop", no longer funky?

He even mentioned that in the Lovesexy tourbook ("...his Funk half assed, no longer daring..." ) when he writes about the making of the Black Album (The Funk Bible) .

.

So, yeah, I don´t necessary agree with Larry but I understand why he´d say what he said.

Most of those who dissed him back then soon realized that they were wrong, and in hindsight some were surprised to see how "black" Prince could be, and how much he did for Black America. But they probably didn´t really get how Prince was transcending racial boundaries instead of being trapped in them like they were, or instead of selling out like some other black acts.

.

Prince was much more than white or black , and way beyond the grasp of the simple categories of critics, fans and peers.

And later in his career, many people started wondering since when Prince became so afrocentric, and why.

I know one orger even went so far and said, and I quote : "Since when did Prince become all niggafied? " as a reaction to some of Prince´s views during the mid 90s all the way through the 2000s. But I don´t remember the orgers name anymore.

.

Many fans still don´t get what Prince was about.

And also....people change....especially Prince.

I´m no longer the same person that I was in 1986, neither are you, neither is Larry Blackmon.

The 80s were such a drastically different era compared to race in popular culture today.

It´s understandable that there would be some friction and tension.

.

Tony M. was quoted as saying "I´m going to push some black into his ass."

Why would he say that back then?

(No disrespect to Tony here, he´s a nice , mellow dude....but he said what he said.)

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"




http://kooleasehvac.com/
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Reply #4 posted 01/09/17 3:10pm

laurarichardso
n

KoolEaze said:

When you say selling out ....are you referring to the year 1981, when he played at the Ritz in New York, or 1986, when this interview took place?


I don´t agree with Larry Blackmon (his name is Blackmon, not Blackmoon) but I understand where he´s coming from....he does have a point even though I don´t necessarily agree with him because I felt the same way about Prince in 1986, and I wasn´t the only one (orger VainAndy might agree with me if he reads this).


Remember that scene in UTCM where Christopher has a nightmare of a rather big , black woman? Even some of his later friends such as Spike Lee found that scene a bit odd, to say the least.


Also , he was more of a pop act at that time than a Funk act but when he started most people thought he was a Funk (and to some extent P-Funk and Funk Rock, RnB) act. But with the Revolution, especially Lisa and Wendy, he became more of a pop phenomenon than part of black music.


That´s also when you´d find his albums in the pop section and no longer in the Funk shelves at record stores, and keep in mind that he kept his racial background a bit vague in the mid 80s.


.


I said I don´t necessarily agree with Larry because I´m sure that Prince , deep in his heart but also in his actions and views, was always part of black and Funk culture, but he also knew that he could transcend such boundaries.


Remember when he became "blacker" during the Parade tour because he made Wally and Greg part of the extended Revolution and Lisa and Wendy, especially Wendy, were quite pissed about it and Wendy said something in the vein of "We could have become the next Beatles .....instead of this".


I love Wendy and Lisa and their contributions, and sure, they created some magic with Prince but I also understand why they probably started getting on Prince´s nerves.


Hell, to this day, I´ve yet to see a Wendy interview where she does not make some sort of snarky, critical comment about Prince....even after his death (see that latest Revolution interview where she just HAD to mention that Lisa was a much more accomplished pianist than Prince....was that really necesssary? ) .


But I digress.....don´t get me wrong, I really like that era and the Revolution and Wendy but I also understand why there was potential for tension.



.


Remember how the critics blasted Prince in the mid to late 80s for being oh so European, for playing more often in Europe than in the USA, for sounding "too white", "too pop", no longer funky?


He even mentioned that in the Lovesexy tourbook ("...his Funk half assed, no longer daring..." ) when he writes about the making of the Black Album (The Funk Bible) .


.


So, yeah, I don´t necessary agree with Larry but I understand why he´d say what he said.


Most of those who dissed him back then soon realized that they were wrong, and in hindsight some were surprised to see how "black" Prince could be, and how much he did for Black America. But they probably didn´t really get how Prince was transcending racial boundaries instead of being trapped in them like they were, or instead of selling out like some other black acts.


.


Prince was much more than white or black , and way beyond the grasp of the simple categories of critics, fans and peers.


And later in his career, many people started wondering since when Prince became so afrocentric, and why.


I know one orger even went so far and said, and I quote : "Since when did Prince become all niggafied? " as a reaction to some of Prince´s views during the mid 90s all the way through the 2000s. But I don´t remember the orgers name anymore.



.


Many fans still don´t get what Prince was about.


And also....people change....especially Prince.


I´m no longer the same person that I was in 1986, neither are you, neither is Larry Blackmon.


The 80s were such a drastically different era compared to race in popular culture today.


It´s understandable that there would be some friction and tension.


.


Tony M. was quoted as saying "I´m going to push some black into his ass."


Why would he say that back then?


(No disrespect to Tony here, he´s a nice , mellow dude....but he said what he said.)


//The whole entire Parade show was black as hell. Now we know about all the black Prince helped out it kind of makes this irrelevant.
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Reply #5 posted 01/09/17 3:18pm

KoolEaze

avatar

laurarichardson said:

KoolEaze said:

When you say selling out ....are you referring to the year 1981, when he played at the Ritz in New York, or 1986, when this interview took place?

I don´t agree with Larry Blackmon (his name is Blackmon, not Blackmoon) but I understand where he´s coming from....he does have a point even though I don´t necessarily agree with him because I felt the same way about Prince in 1986, and I wasn´t the only one (orger VainAndy might agree with me if he reads this).

Remember that scene in UTCM where Christopher has a nightmare of a rather big , black woman? Even some of his later friends such as Spike Lee found that scene a bit odd, to say the least.

Also , he was more of a pop act at that time than a Funk act but when he started most people thought he was a Funk (and to some extent P-Funk and Funk Rock, RnB) act. But with the Revolution, especially Lisa and Wendy, he became more of a pop phenomenon than part of black music.

That´s also when you´d find his albums in the pop section and no longer in the Funk shelves at record stores, and keep in mind that he kept his racial background a bit vague in the mid 80s.

.

I said I don´t necessarily agree with Larry because I´m sure that Prince , deep in his heart but also in his actions and views, was always part of black and Funk culture, but he also knew that he could transcend such boundaries.

Remember when he became "blacker" during the Parade tour because he made Wally and Greg part of the extended Revolution and Lisa and Wendy, especially Wendy, were quite pissed about it and Wendy said something in the vein of "We could have become the next Beatles .....instead of this".

I love Wendy and Lisa and their contributions, and sure, they created some magic with Prince but I also understand why they probably started getting on Prince´s nerves.

Hell, to this day, I´ve yet to see a Wendy interview where she does not make some sort of snarky, critical comment about Prince....even after his death (see that latest Revolution interview where she just HAD to mention that Lisa was a much more accomplished pianist than Prince....was that really necesssary? ) .

But I digress.....don´t get me wrong, I really like that era and the Revolution and Wendy but I also understand why there was potential for tension.

.

Remember how the critics blasted Prince in the mid to late 80s for being oh so European, for playing more often in Europe than in the USA, for sounding "too white", "too pop", no longer funky?

He even mentioned that in the Lovesexy tourbook ("...his Funk half assed, no longer daring..." ) when he writes about the making of the Black Album (The Funk Bible) .

.

So, yeah, I don´t necessary agree with Larry but I understand why he´d say what he said.

Most of those who dissed him back then soon realized that they were wrong, and in hindsight some were surprised to see how "black" Prince could be, and how much he did for Black America. But they probably didn´t really get how Prince was transcending racial boundaries instead of being trapped in them like they were, or instead of selling out like some other black acts.

.

Prince was much more than white or black , and way beyond the grasp of the simple categories of critics, fans and peers.

And later in his career, many people started wondering since when Prince became so afrocentric, and why.

I know one orger even went so far and said, and I quote : "Since when did Prince become all niggafied? " as a reaction to some of Prince´s views during the mid 90s all the way through the 2000s. But I don´t remember the orgers name anymore.

.

Many fans still don´t get what Prince was about.

And also....people change....especially Prince.

I´m no longer the same person that I was in 1986, neither are you, neither is Larry Blackmon.

The 80s were such a drastically different era compared to race in popular culture today.

It´s understandable that there would be some friction and tension.

.

Tony M. was quoted as saying "I´m going to push some black into his ass."

Why would he say that back then?

(No disrespect to Tony here, he´s a nice , mellow dude....but he said what he said.)

//The whole entire Parade show was black as hell. Now we know about all the black Prince helped out it kind of makes this irrelevant.

Sure. But you know how Wendy and other members felt about that.

And yes, Prince did a lot of things that people weren´t aware of back then (but then again, we already knew about many good things he was doing, such as helping Marva Collins and her school).

What did you find irrelevant about my post?

It is irrelevant now, but I was merely trying to answer the OP´s question regarding Larry Blackmon´s attitude ( and also other people´s attitude ) regarding Prince´s "blacknesss" and Funk roots in the mid to late 80s.

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"




http://kooleasehvac.com/
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Reply #6 posted 01/09/17 3:23pm

ladygirl99

avatar

thebanishedone said:

In

Cameo Fights Funk Image

interview Larry said
I could name names but I won't," he said. "You know who I'm talking about anyway. It's like, now they have all that money, they can forget they're black. They don't have to worry about money. They could say and do a lot of things for black people but they don't. All of them would be nowhere without that black base audience that gave them a start.

"One guy in particular I used to hang out with when he had nothing. I remember when he was playing bars on Seventh Avenue (in New York). Now he's big and all of a sudden very white. That bothers me."

This interview was from 1986.Prince played in New York Ritz club in 1981

and Prince was accused around that time for selling out to white audiance so was he talking about Prince?

[Edited 1/9/17 12:59pm]

I know this is an old interview and I dig Cameo's music but I bet he would have a fit if someone would questioned his blackness because of his marriage to a white woman.

My point is I am sick and tired of the Acting Black Crew (aka black community) always police black people who have different interests and views from mainstream Black America. I mean can carefree blacks just breathe and live as individuals lol . Geez society remind everyday that weirdo types (the ones who are too black for white people and too weird for black people or people like Prince) are black.

And Prince was blacker and did more to the black community than an average Black Panther by providing economic and career opportinuities. He donated to black charities, always hired black people as lawyers (especially women), publicists, bodyguards, musicians, drivers, hairstylists, etc. He told Spike Lee, I believed, he was also pressure to have androgyous women in his films and music videos by his record company to sell more records.

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Reply #7 posted 01/09/17 3:26pm

Dibblekins

thebanishedone said:

princve was friend with Slash and Axl latter in life but u cant say they were friends during the 1991 mtv incident

What incident was this???

I expect you're going to tell me to do a search, hmmm? wink biggrin

Also, re the 1991 MTV Awards - Van Halen played those too - do we have any evidence that Prince ever met EVH? Now there is a collaboration I'd have liked to see! biggrin

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Reply #8 posted 01/09/17 3:26pm

KoolEaze

avatar

ladygirl99 said:

thebanishedone said:

In

Cameo Fights Funk Image

interview Larry said
I could name names but I won't," he said. "You know who I'm talking about anyway. It's like, now they have all that money, they can forget they're black. They don't have to worry about money. They could say and do a lot of things for black people but they don't. All of them would be nowhere without that black base audience that gave them a start.

"One guy in particular I used to hang out with when he had nothing. I remember when he was playing bars on Seventh Avenue (in New York). Now he's big and all of a sudden very white. That bothers me."

This interview was from 1986.Prince played in New York Ritz club in 1981

and Prince was accused around that time for selling out to white audiance so was he talking about Prince?

[Edited 1/9/17 12:59pm]

I know this is an old interview and I dig Cameo's music but I bet he would have a fit if someone would questioned his blackness because of his marriage to a white woman.

My point is I am sick and tired of the Acting Black Crew (aka black community) always police black people who have different interests and views from mainstream Black America. I mean can carefree blacks just breathe and live as individuals lol . Geez society remind everyday that weirdo types (the ones who are too black for white people and too weird for black people or people like Prince) are black.

And Prince was blacker and did more to the black community than an average Black Panther by providing economic and career opportinuities. He donated to black charities, always hired black people as lawyers (especially women), publicists, bodyguards, musicians, drivers, hairstylists, etc. He told Spike Lee, I believed, he was also pressure to have androgyous women in his films and music videos by his record company to sell more records.

This is a phenomenon that can be found in many other minority cultures as well.

It´s rather interesting, albeit at times also very annoying.

And the similarities are astounding.

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"




http://kooleasehvac.com/
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Reply #9 posted 01/09/17 3:43pm

ladygirl99

avatar

KoolEaze said:

laurarichardson said:

KoolEaze said: //The whole entire Parade show was black as hell. Now we know about all the black Prince helped out it kind of makes this irrelevant.

Sure. But you know how Wendy and other members felt about that.

And yes, Prince did a lot of things that people weren´t aware of back then (but then again, we already knew about many good things he was doing, such as helping Marva Collins and her school).

What did you find irrelevant about my post?

It is irrelevant now, but I was merely trying to answer the OP´s question regarding Larry Blackmon´s attitude ( and also other people´s attitude ) regarding Prince´s "blacknesss" and Funk roots in the mid to late 80s.

Yeah I forgot about Marva Collins. And even Kurtis Blow said Prince financed the King Holiday video ( I just listened to the song today its dope). And also the Baltimore song he discussed about police bruality.

I think Wendy just wanted Prince continued with his mainstream efforts because the truth of the matter is to this day your music have a better chance of selling if it appeals to mainstream demographics. I mean Prince also said he wanted to be know as a musician not another funk artist so if people have to go after Wendy then they have to go after Prince too.

And also I don't believed Wendy or Lisa are racist as some people on this and other boards called them. As a matter of fact Wendy discussed her anger about police bruality against blacks on her twitter page and Lisa took a lot of heat awhile back when she posted a scanned photo of some old Ebony article with a picture of Black Power on her facebook page. So if people called Wendy and Lisa racists I would then I need to see some solid evidence as I am on their facebook pages and they stay giving shoutout to black people.

But I hope Cameo since expanded his views and he also was or still married to someone outside his race and that was article was in 1981 after all.

[Edited 1/9/17 15:46pm]

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Reply #10 posted 01/09/17 3:43pm

ladygirl99

avatar

KoolEaze said:

ladygirl99 said:

I know this is an old interview and I dig Cameo's music but I bet he would have a fit if someone would questioned his blackness because of his marriage to a white woman.

My point is I am sick and tired of the Acting Black Crew (aka black community) always police black people who have different interests and views from mainstream Black America. I mean can carefree blacks just breathe and live as individuals lol . Geez society remind everyday that weirdo types (the ones who are too black for white people and too weird for black people or people like Prince) are black.

And Prince was blacker and did more to the black community than an average Black Panther by providing economic and career opportinuities. He donated to black charities, always hired black people as lawyers (especially women), publicists, bodyguards, musicians, drivers, hairstylists, etc. He told Spike Lee, I believed, he was also pressure to have androgyous women in his films and music videos by his record company to sell more records.

This is a phenomenon that can be found in many other minority cultures as well.

It´s rather interesting, albeit at times also very annoying.

And the similarities are astounding.

yeahthat

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Reply #11 posted 01/09/17 3:48pm

KoolEaze

avatar

ladygirl99 said:

KoolEaze said:

Sure. But you know how Wendy and other members felt about that.

And yes, Prince did a lot of things that people weren´t aware of back then (but then again, we already knew about many good things he was doing, such as helping Marva Collins and her school).

What did you find irrelevant about my post?

It is irrelevant now, but I was merely trying to answer the OP´s question regarding Larry Blackmon´s attitude ( and also other people´s attitude ) regarding Prince´s "blacknesss" and Funk roots in the mid to late 80s.

Yeah I forgot about Marva Collins. And even Kurtis Blow said Prince financed the King Holiday video ( I just listened to the song today its dope). And also the Baltimore song he discussed about police bruality.

I think Wendy just wanted Prince continued with his mainstream efforts because the truth of the matter is to this day your music have a better chance of selling if it appeals to mainstream demographics. I mean Prince also said he wanted to be know as a musician not another funk artist so if people have to go after Wendy then they have to go after Prince too.

And also I don't believed Wendy or Lisa are racist as some people on this and other boards called them. As a matter of fact Wendy discussed her anger about police bruality against blacks on her twitter page and Lisa took a lot of heat awhile back when she posted a scanned photo of some old Ebony article with a picture of Black Power on her facebook page. So if people called Wendy and Lisa racists I would then I need to see some solid evidence as I am on their facebook pages and they stay giving shoutout to black people.

But I hope Cameo since expanded his views and he also was or still married to someone outside his race and that was article was in 1981 after all.

[Edited 1/9/17 15:46pm]

Oh, I absolutely love Wendy and Lisa, far be it from me to assume anything remotely racist about them. And in fact, I´ve never read about anybody accusing them of racism.

But I get your point. wink

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"




http://kooleasehvac.com/
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Reply #12 posted 01/09/17 3:50pm

Sly

avatar

KoolEaze said:

When you say selling out ....are you referring to the year 1981, when he played at the Ritz in New York, or 1986, when this interview took place?

I don´t agree with Larry Blackmon (his name is Blackmon, not Blackmoon) but I understand where he´s coming from....he does have a point even though I don´t necessarily agree with him because I felt the same way about Prince in 1986, and I wasn´t the only one (orger VainAndy might agree with me if he reads this).

Remember that scene in UTCM where Christopher has a nightmare of a rather big , black woman? Even some of his later friends such as Spike Lee found that scene a bit odd, to say the least.

Also , he was more of a pop act at that time than a Funk act but when he started most people thought he was a Funk (and to some extent P-Funk and Funk Rock, RnB) act. But with the Revolution, especially Lisa and Wendy, he became more of a pop phenomenon than part of black music.

That´s also when you´d find his albums in the pop section and no longer in the Funk shelves at record stores, and keep in mind that he kept his racial background a bit vague in the mid 80s.

.

I said I don´t necessarily agree with Larry because I´m sure that Prince , deep in his heart but also in his actions and views, was always part of black and Funk culture, but he also knew that he could transcend such boundaries.

Remember when he became "blacker" during the Parade tour because he made Wally and Greg part of the extended Revolution and Lisa and Wendy, especially Wendy, were quite pissed about it and Wendy said something in the vein of "We could have become the next Beatles .....instead of this".

I love Wendy and Lisa and their contributions, and sure, they created some magic with Prince but I also understand why they probably started getting on Prince´s nerves.

Hell, to this day, I´ve yet to see a Wendy interview where she does not make some sort of snarky, critical comment about Prince....even after his death (see that latest Revolution interview where she just HAD to mention that Lisa was a much more accomplished pianist than Prince....was that really necesssary? ) .

But I digress.....don´t get me wrong, I really like that era and the Revolution and Wendy but I also understand why there was potential for tension.

.

Remember how the critics blasted Prince in the mid to late 80s for being oh so European, for playing more often in Europe than in the USA, for sounding "too white", "too pop", no longer funky?

He even mentioned that in the Lovesexy tourbook ("...his Funk half assed, no longer daring..." ) when he writes about the making of the Black Album (The Funk Bible) .

.

So, yeah, I don´t necessary agree with Larry but I understand why he´d say what he said.

Most of those who dissed him back then soon realized that they were wrong, and in hindsight some were surprised to see how "black" Prince could be, and how much he did for Black America. But they probably didn´t really get how Prince was transcending racial boundaries instead of being trapped in them like they were, or instead of selling out like some other black acts.

.

Prince was much more than white or black , and way beyond the grasp of the simple categories of critics, fans and peers.

And later in his career, many people started wondering since when Prince became so afrocentric, and why.

I know one orger even went so far and said, and I quote : "Since when did Prince become all niggafied? " as a reaction to some of Prince´s views during the mid 90s all the way through the 2000s. But I don´t remember the orgers name anymore.

.

Many fans still don´t get what Prince was about.

And also....people change....especially Prince.

I´m no longer the same person that I was in 1986, neither are you, neither is Larry Blackmon.

The 80s were such a drastically different era compared to race in popular culture today.

It´s understandable that there would be some friction and tension.

.

Tony M. was quoted as saying "I´m going to push some black into his ass."

Why would he say that back then?

(No disrespect to Tony here, he´s a nice , mellow dude....but he said what he said.)

Thanks for sharing. Found that really interesting, and wasn't aware of some of the detail (Revolution tension, Wendy etc.)

Any books you'd recommend?

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"YEAH!!!"

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Reply #13 posted 01/09/17 4:08pm

KoolEaze

avatar

Sly said:

KoolEaze said:

When you say selling out ....are you referring to the year 1981, when he played at the Ritz in New York, or 1986, when this interview took place?

I don´t agree with Larry Blackmon (his name is Blackmon, not Blackmoon) but I understand where he´s coming from....he does have a point even though I don´t necessarily agree with him because I felt the same way about Prince in 1986, and I wasn´t the only one (orger VainAndy might agree with me if he reads this).

Remember that scene in UTCM where Christopher has a nightmare of a rather big , black woman? Even some of his later friends such as Spike Lee found that scene a bit odd, to say the least.

Also , he was more of a pop act at that time than a Funk act but when he started most people thought he was a Funk (and to some extent P-Funk and Funk Rock, RnB) act. But with the Revolution, especially Lisa and Wendy, he became more of a pop phenomenon than part of black music.

That´s also when you´d find his albums in the pop section and no longer in the Funk shelves at record stores, and keep in mind that he kept his racial background a bit vague in the mid 80s.

.

I said I don´t necessarily agree with Larry because I´m sure that Prince , deep in his heart but also in his actions and views, was always part of black and Funk culture, but he also knew that he could transcend such boundaries.

Remember when he became "blacker" during the Parade tour because he made Wally and Greg part of the extended Revolution and Lisa and Wendy, especially Wendy, were quite pissed about it and Wendy said something in the vein of "We could have become the next Beatles .....instead of this".

I love Wendy and Lisa and their contributions, and sure, they created some magic with Prince but I also understand why they probably started getting on Prince´s nerves.

Hell, to this day, I´ve yet to see a Wendy interview where she does not make some sort of snarky, critical comment about Prince....even after his death (see that latest Revolution interview where she just HAD to mention that Lisa was a much more accomplished pianist than Prince....was that really necesssary? ) .

But I digress.....don´t get me wrong, I really like that era and the Revolution and Wendy but I also understand why there was potential for tension.

.

Remember how the critics blasted Prince in the mid to late 80s for being oh so European, for playing more often in Europe than in the USA, for sounding "too white", "too pop", no longer funky?

He even mentioned that in the Lovesexy tourbook ("...his Funk half assed, no longer daring..." ) when he writes about the making of the Black Album (The Funk Bible) .

.

So, yeah, I don´t necessary agree with Larry but I understand why he´d say what he said.

Most of those who dissed him back then soon realized that they were wrong, and in hindsight some were surprised to see how "black" Prince could be, and how much he did for Black America. But they probably didn´t really get how Prince was transcending racial boundaries instead of being trapped in them like they were, or instead of selling out like some other black acts.

.

Prince was much more than white or black , and way beyond the grasp of the simple categories of critics, fans and peers.

And later in his career, many people started wondering since when Prince became so afrocentric, and why.

I know one orger even went so far and said, and I quote : "Since when did Prince become all niggafied? " as a reaction to some of Prince´s views during the mid 90s all the way through the 2000s. But I don´t remember the orgers name anymore.

.

Many fans still don´t get what Prince was about.

And also....people change....especially Prince.

I´m no longer the same person that I was in 1986, neither are you, neither is Larry Blackmon.

The 80s were such a drastically different era compared to race in popular culture today.

It´s understandable that there would be some friction and tension.

.

Tony M. was quoted as saying "I´m going to push some black into his ass."

Why would he say that back then?

(No disrespect to Tony here, he´s a nice , mellow dude....but he said what he said.)

Thanks for sharing. Found that really interesting, and wasn't aware of some of the detail (Revolution tension, Wendy etc.)

Any books you'd recommend?

Hey Sly, long time no see.....good to see you back on the org.

Feels good to see some oldschool folks on the org again.

.

I collected most of my info here and there over the years ,so there´s no particular source where I got it from. Most of it is based on interviews, prince.org, books, etc.

But if you are looking for some good books use the search engine, we´ve had quite a few biography threads while you were gone.

As far as my personal preferences go, I still love Dave Hill´s Prince-A Pop Life. A bit outdated but still a highly enjoyable read with some great interviews , for example with Sonny T . before he joined the NPG and while he was still a Prince cover act in the Twin Cities. That book takes you all the way from the beginning until 1988.

Another good but very controversial ( and partly erroneous ) book is Possessed -The Rise and Fall of Prince, by Alex Hahn ( did pro bono work as a lawyer for Uptown magazine when they were faced with a lawsuit). Good read despite its few flaws.

Jim Walsh, the journalist who followed Prince closely during the Gold Experience era is just about to release a book real soon. Remember he wrote the liner notes for the Gold Experience (or rather, his text was used as such).

His book is called The Gold Experience but I´m writing this off the top of my head so I´m not sure, pretty busy right now.

Bart made a thread about Jim Walsh´s upcoming book. You should definitely check that thread out. Lots of info there.

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"




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Reply #14 posted 01/09/17 4:57pm

MD431Madcat

avatar

Odd?

Hell i'd scream and run my damn self if some

'demon voodoo priestess bitch'

was laughing in my face whilst looking like eartha kitt if she was in the thriller video! lol

KoolEaze said:

When you say selling out ....are you referring to the year 1981, when he played at the Ritz in New York, or 1986, when this interview took place?

I don´t agree with Larry Blackmon (his name is Blackmon, not Blackmoon) but I understand where he´s coming from....he does have a point even though I don´t necessarily agree with him because I felt the same way about Prince in 1986, and I wasn´t the only one (orger VainAndy might agree with me if he reads this).

Remember that scene in UTCM where Christopher has a nightmare of a rather big , black woman? Even some of his later friends such as Spike Lee found that scene a bit odd, to say the least.

Also , he was more of a pop act at that time than a Funk act but when he started most people thought he was a Funk (and to some extent P-Funk and Funk Rock, RnB) act. But with the Revolution, especially Lisa and Wendy, he became more of a pop phenomenon than part of black music.

That´s also when you´d find his albums in the pop section and no longer in the Funk shelves at record stores, and keep in mind that he kept his racial background a bit vague in the mid 80s.

.

I said I don´t necessarily agree with Larry because I´m sure that Prince , deep in his heart but also in his actions and views, was always part of black and Funk culture, but he also knew that he could transcend such boundaries.

Remember when he became "blacker" during the Parade tour because he made Wally and Greg part of the extended Revolution and Lisa and Wendy, especially Wendy, were quite pissed about it and Wendy said something in the vein of "We could have become the next Beatles .....instead of this".

I love Wendy and Lisa and their contributions, and sure, they created some magic with Prince but I also understand why they probably started getting on Prince´s nerves.

Hell, to this day, I´ve yet to see a Wendy interview where she does not make some sort of snarky, critical comment about Prince....even after his death (see that latest Revolution interview where she just HAD to mention that Lisa was a much more accomplished pianist than Prince....was that really necesssary? ) .

But I digress.....don´t get me wrong, I really like that era and the Revolution and Wendy but I also understand why there was potential for tension.

.

Remember how the critics blasted Prince in the mid to late 80s for being oh so European, for playing more often in Europe than in the USA, for sounding "too white", "too pop", no longer funky?

He even mentioned that in the Lovesexy tourbook ("...his Funk half assed, no longer daring..." ) when he writes about the making of the Black Album (The Funk Bible) .

.

So, yeah, I don´t necessary agree with Larry but I understand why he´d say what he said.

Most of those who dissed him back then soon realized that they were wrong, and in hindsight some were surprised to see how "black" Prince could be, and how much he did for Black America. But they probably didn´t really get how Prince was transcending racial boundaries instead of being trapped in them like they were, or instead of selling out like some other black acts.

.

Prince was much more than white or black , and way beyond the grasp of the simple categories of critics, fans and peers.

And later in his career, many people started wondering since when Prince became so afrocentric, and why.

I know one orger even went so far and said, and I quote : "Since when did Prince become all niggafied? " as a reaction to some of Prince´s views during the mid 90s all the way through the 2000s. But I don´t remember the orgers name anymore.

.

Many fans still don´t get what Prince was about.

And also....people change....especially Prince.

I´m no longer the same person that I was in 1986, neither are you, neither is Larry Blackmon.

The 80s were such a drastically different era compared to race in popular culture today.

It´s understandable that there would be some friction and tension.

.

Tony M. was quoted as saying "I´m going to push some black into his ass."

Why would he say that back then?

(No disrespect to Tony here, he´s a nice , mellow dude....but he said what he said.)

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Reply #15 posted 01/10/17 7:42am

databank

avatar

thebanishedone said:

RJOrion said:

thebanishedone said: nah...i doubt it....Larry Blackmon has been on record saying him and P were real cool...John Blackwell even came from Cameo's camp

remember this was in 1986 maybe they were cool latter

princve was friend with Slash and Axl latter in life he was??? eek

but u cant say they were friends during the 1991 mtv incident what incident??? eek

A COMPREHENSIVE PRINCE DISCOGRAPHY (work in progress ^^): https://sites.google.com/...iscog/home
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Reply #16 posted 01/10/17 8:03am

Genesia

avatar

I don't understand why anyone would think he's referring to Prince. The quote talks about somebody who played bars on 7th Avenue in New York. Is there anything in the history to suggest that Prince did that? Or that he ever "hung out" with Larry Blackmon?

This is just more stupid speculation about something that, in all probability, has fuck all to do with Prince.

[Edited 1/10/17 8:03am]

I mean if he did have sex he would break every rule Jehova's have regarding premarital sex so Prince is really just friends with them all anyway.
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Reply #17 posted 01/10/17 8:45am

jcurley

KoolEaze said:

When you say selling out ....are you referring to the year 1981, when he played at the Ritz in New York, or 1986, when this interview took place?


I don´t agree with Larry Blackmon (his name is Blackmon, not Blackmoon) but I understand where he´s coming from....he does have a point even though I don´t necessarily agree with him because I felt the same way about Prince in 1986, and I wasn´t the only one (orger VainAndy might agree with me if he reads this).


Remember that scene in UTCM where Christopher has a nightmare of a rather big , black woman? Even some of his later friends such as Spike Lee found that scene a bit odd, to say the least.


Also , he was more of a pop act at that time than a Funk act but when he started most people thought he was a Funk (and to some extent P-Funk and Funk Rock, RnB) act. But with the Revolution, especially Lisa and Wendy, he became more of a pop phenomenon than part of black music.


That´s also when you´d find his albums in the pop section and no longer in the Funk shelves at record stores, and keep in mind that he kept his racial background a bit vague in the mid 80s.


.


I said I don´t necessarily agree with Larry because I´m sure that Prince , deep in his heart but also in his actions and views, was always part of black and Funk culture, but he also knew that he could transcend such boundaries.


Remember when he became "blacker" during the Parade tour because he made Wally and Greg part of the extended Revolution and Lisa and Wendy, especially Wendy, were quite pissed about it and Wendy said something in the vein of "We could have become the next Beatles .....instead of this".


I love Wendy and Lisa and their contributions, and sure, they created some magic with Prince but I also understand why they probably started getting on Prince´s nerves.


Hell, to this day, I´ve yet to see a Wendy interview where she does not make some sort of snarky, critical comment about Prince....even after his death (see that latest Revolution interview where she just HAD to mention that Lisa was a much more accomplished pianist than Prince....was that really necesssary? ) .


But I digress.....don´t get me wrong, I really like that era and the Revolution and Wendy but I also understand why there was potential for tension.



.


Remember how the critics blasted Prince in the mid to late 80s for being oh so European, for playing more often in Europe than in the USA, for sounding "too white", "too pop", no longer funky?


He even mentioned that in the Lovesexy tourbook ("...his Funk half assed, no longer daring..." ) when he writes about the making of the Black Album (The Funk Bible) .


.


So, yeah, I don´t necessary agree with Larry but I understand why he´d say what he said.


Most of those who dissed him back then soon realized that they were wrong, and in hindsight some were surprised to see how "black" Prince could be, and how much he did for Black America. But they probably didn´t really get how Prince was transcending racial boundaries instead of being trapped in them like they were, or instead of selling out like some other black acts.


.


Prince was much more than white or black , and way beyond the grasp of the simple categories of critics, fans and peers.


And later in his career, many people started wondering since when Prince became so afrocentric, and why.


I know one orger even went so far and said, and I quote : "Since when did Prince become all niggafied? " as a reaction to some of Prince´s views during the mid 90s all the way through the 2000s. But I don´t remember the orgers name anymore.



.


Many fans still don´t get what Prince was about.


And also....people change....especially Prince.


I´m no longer the same person that I was in 1986, neither are you, neither is Larry Blackmon.


The 80s were such a drastically different era compared to race in popular culture today.


It´s understandable that there would be some friction and tension.


.


Tony M. was quoted as saying "I´m going to push some black into his ass."


Why would he say that back then?


(No disrespect to Tony here, he´s a nice , mellow dude....but he said what he said.)



I think you're right but to be fair to Prince he was a phenomenon and was playing by his own rules. Musically if he wanted to sell out Parade wasn't the way to go.
You're also right about Wendy, she always sounds peevish. She's very arrogant I find
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Reply #18 posted 01/10/17 10:28am

SoulAlive

I was thinking the same thing.We really don't know exactly who Larry is talking about.

Genesia said:

I don't understand why anyone would think he's referring to Prince. The quote talks about somebody who played bars on 7th Avenue in New York. Is there anything in the history to suggest that Prince did that? Or that he ever "hung out" with Larry Blackmon?

This is just more stupid speculation about something that, in all probability, has fuck all to do with Prince.

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Reply #19 posted 01/10/17 12:42pm

MD431Madcat

avatar

the ritz wasn't on 7th ave..

nor was 'the bottom line'..

and Larry knows Prince was too badass to diss! wink

[Edited 1/10/17 12:43pm]

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Reply #20 posted 01/10/17 1:00pm

PeteSilas

avatar

thebanishedone said:

In

Cameo Fights Funk Image

interview Larry said
I could name names but I won't," he said. "You know who I'm talking about anyway. It's like, now they have all that money, they can forget they're black. They don't have to worry about money. They could say and do a lot of things for black people but they don't. All of them would be nowhere without that black base audience that gave them a start.

"One guy in particular I used to hang out with when he had nothing. I remember when he was playing bars on Seventh Avenue (in New York). Now he's big and all of a sudden very white. That bothers me."

This interview was from 1986.Prince played in New York Ritz club in 1981

and Prince was accused around that time for selling out to white audiance so was he talking about Prince?

[Edited 1/9/17 12:59pm]

since when did Prince hang out with this guy? Are you guys sure it's Prince he's talking about? I don't think Prince was "broke" in 81 either.

We Are The Greatest!
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Reply #21 posted 01/10/17 2:21pm

KoolEaze

avatar

PeteSilas said:

thebanishedone said:

In

Cameo Fights Funk Image

interview Larry said
I could name names but I won't," he said. "You know who I'm talking about anyway. It's like, now they have all that money, they can forget they're black. They don't have to worry about money. They could say and do a lot of things for black people but they don't. All of them would be nowhere without that black base audience that gave them a start.

"One guy in particular I used to hang out with when he had nothing. I remember when he was playing bars on Seventh Avenue (in New York). Now he's big and all of a sudden very white. That bothers me."

This interview was from 1986.Prince played in New York Ritz club in 1981

and Prince was accused around that time for selling out to white audiance so was he talking about Prince?

[Edited 1/9/17 12:59pm]

since when did Prince hang out with this guy? Are you guys sure it's Prince he's talking about? I don't think Prince was "broke" in 81 either.

According to Larry Blackmon they did hang out. But Larry had nothing but praise for him and told some anecdotes from the 70s when they were at a party with Miles...but as far as I know this can´t be true, can it? Because from what I´ve read in biographies Prince and Miles met later, not in the 70s. But maybe Larry got the date wrong. He wrote about Prince after he´d passed away, and he had nothing but respect and admiration for him.

But that does not negate what I wrote above, nor does it rule out that Larry was indeed referring to Prince in that 86 interview. However, I remain skeptical until I see a source or two, and there´s also the possibility that the diss was just a temporary thing back then, if it ever happened at all.

But....google Larry Blackmon and Prince and you´ll find that they indeed hung out.

" I´d rather be a stank ass hoe because I´m not stupid. Oh my goodness! I got more drugs! I´m always funny dude...I´m hilarious! Are we gonna smoke?"




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Reply #22 posted 01/10/17 3:20pm

PeteSilas

avatar

greg tate had an interesting theory about the black woman in UTCM, very interesting to me personally. He said that Prince might have been molested or seduced by a woman like that when he was a kid and that's the origin for the scene. Where the fuck greg came up with the idea who knows but....I always was reminded of a woman in my church, a darkskinned brazilian woman who had me over for yardwork when i was 14, she was one horny momma, that lady reminded me of her, even the angel the lady used to look at me, however, unlike prince, i loved that shit, i still try to get at her on facebook and she's got to be 70 by now.

We Are The Greatest!
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Reply #23 posted 01/10/17 3:32pm

Genesia

avatar

PeteSilas said:

greg tate had an interesting theory about the black woman in UTCM, very interesting to me personally. He said that Prince might have been molested or seduced by a woman like that when he was a kid and that's the origin for the scene. Where the fuck greg came up with the idea who knows but....I always was reminded of a woman in my church, a darkskinned brazilian woman who had me over for yardwork when i was 14, she was one horny momma, that lady reminded me of her, even the angel the lady used to look at me, however, unlike prince, i loved that shit, i still try to get at her on facebook and she's got to be 70 by now.



What does this have to do with the price of pork - or this thread?
I mean if he did have sex he would break every rule Jehova's have regarding premarital sex so Prince is really just friends with them all anyway.
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Reply #24 posted 01/10/17 3:44pm

PeteSilas

avatar

Genesia said:

PeteSilas said:

greg tate had an interesting theory about the black woman in UTCM, very interesting to me personally. He said that Prince might have been molested or seduced by a woman like that when he was a kid and that's the origin for the scene. Where the fuck greg came up with the idea who knows but....I always was reminded of a woman in my church, a darkskinned brazilian woman who had me over for yardwork when i was 14, she was one horny momma, that lady reminded me of her, even the angel the lady used to look at me, however, unlike prince, i loved that shit, i still try to get at her on facebook and she's got to be 70 by now.

What does this have to do with the price of pork - or this thread?

someone brought up that the scene in UTCM where the black lady came to prince and how it showed that Prince was rejecting black women/blackness. I'm just saying that Greg Tate read it differently, are you following the thread? We're talking about Prince and how Blackmon supposedly said he was kissing up to white folk.

We Are The Greatest!
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Reply #25 posted 01/10/17 3:45pm

PeteSilas

avatar

anyway, the Tate's idea sounds ridiculous, even to me, until I thought about how much that scene reminded me of ol Raquel "when are you going to come over again Pete, hahahah" while she looked down at me the same way. Hahaha

We Are The Greatest!
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Reply #26 posted 01/10/17 3:46pm

laurarichardso
n

PeteSilas said:

greg tate had an interesting theory about the black woman in UTCM, very interesting to me personally. He said that Prince might have been molested or seduced by a woman like that when he was a kid and that's the origin for the scene. Where the fuck greg came up with the idea who knows but....I always was reminded of a woman in my church, a darkskinned brazilian woman who had me over for yardwork when i was 14, she was one horny momma, that lady reminded me of her, even the angel the lady used to look at me, however, unlike prince, i loved that shit, i still try to get at her on facebook and she's got to be 70 by now.


-/There has been a wild rumor going around about Prince being with an older women when he was a teen Know proof or source for this but that is were Greg Tate got that from. I took the scence to mean he was afraid of were his life was going is it about love or money.
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Reply #27 posted 01/10/17 3:48pm

laurarichardso
n

KoolEaze said:



PeteSilas said:




thebanishedone said:


In


Cameo Fights Funk Image


interview Larry said

I could name names but I won't," he said. "You know who I'm talking about anyway. It's like, now they have all that money, they can forget they're black. They don't have to worry about money. They could say and do a lot of things for black people but they don't. All of them would be nowhere without that black base audience that gave them a start.


"One guy in particular I used to hang out with when he had nothing. I remember when he was playing bars on Seventh Avenue (in New York). Now he's big and all of a sudden very white. That bothers me."



This interview was from 1986.Prince played in New York Ritz club in 1981


and Prince was accused around that time for selling out to white audiance so was he talking about Prince?



[Edited 1/9/17 12:59pm]



since when did Prince hang out with this guy? Are you guys sure it's Prince he's talking about? I don't think Prince was "broke" in 81 either.



According to Larry Blackmon they did hang out. But Larry had nothing but praise for him and told some anecdotes from the 70s when they were at a party with Miles...but as far as I know this can´t be true, can it? Because from what I´ve read in biographies Prince and Miles met later, not in the 70s. But maybe Larry got the date wrong. He wrote about Prince after he´d passed away, and he had nothing but respect and admiration for him.


But that does not negate what I wrote above, nor does it rule out that Larry was indeed referring to Prince in that 86 interview. However, I remain skeptical until I see a source or two, and there´s also the possibility that the diss was just a temporary thing back then, if it ever happened at all.


But....google Larry Blackmon and Prince and you´ll find that they indeed hung out.


He was not talking about hanging with Miles in the 70s he was talking about hanging out Miles birthday party in 86. Pepe Willis also said they hung out with Cameo when Prince was promoting his first album.
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Reply #28 posted 01/10/17 3:55pm

PeteSilas

avatar

the way tate said it, sounded like he was speaking from experience too. Lots of us men have older women come on to us in our teens, in those days it wasn't such a taboo but people didn't talk about it either.

We Are The Greatest!
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Reply #29 posted 01/10/17 4:18pm

laurarichardso
n

PeteSilas said:

the way tate said it, sounded like he was speaking from experience too. Lots of us men have older women come on to us in our teens, in those days it wasn't such a taboo but people didn't talk about it either.


I hate to think something like this happen to him but back in the day people did not take this stuff seriously. In addition, Andre Cymone said his brother Eddie was a pimp and that Prince got an education in the Andersen household.
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