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Thread started 01/25/18 10:07am

RodeoSchro

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Cape Town is about to RUN OUT OF WATER




eek eek eek eek eek eek

I didn't believe it when I saw the headline, but it's true - in about 10 weeks, Cape Town is going to be OUT OF WATER. Four million people live there. And they are going to RUN OUT OF WATER.

Even worse, it seems that a whole lot of Cape Towners don't believe it, and haven't stopped using all the water they want. The possibility, or probability, of no water is just incomprehensible.

What are they going to do when April comes around and it hasn't rained? How in the world can the global community get water to millions of people?

Wow.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/...index.html


(CNN)In Cape Town, South Africa, they're calling it "Day Zero" -- the day when the taps run dry.

City officials had recently said that day would come on April 22. This week, they moved up the date to April 12.

So how did this happen? How does a major city in the developed world just run dry?

It's been a slow-motion crisis, exacerbated by three factors:

Starting February 1, residents will only be allowed to use 50 liters, or a little over 13 gallons, of water per person, per day.

Water levels at dams supplying the city have dropped 1.4% in the last week, and video taken Tuesday of the city's largest dam, Theewaterskloof, shows an almost-barren reservoir bed.

Some who have money to leave Cape Town until the crisis subsides are doing so. Darryn Ten plans on doing just that.

But there are those who can't -- the elderly, disabled and the impoverished.

"They don't have the money to buy water," Verbist told CNN.

Second Funkiest White Man in America

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Reply #1 posted 01/25/18 11:05am

13cjk13

RodeoSchro said:




eek eek eek eek eek eek

I didn't believe it when I saw the headline, but it's true - in about 10 weeks, Cape Town is going to be OUT OF WATER. Four million people live there. And they are going to RUN OUT OF WATER.

Even worse, it seems that a whole lot of Cape Towners don't believe it, and haven't stopped using all the water they want. The possibility, or probability, of no water is just incomprehensible.

What are they going to do when April comes around and it hasn't rained? How in the world can the global community get water to millions of people?

Wow.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/...index.html


(CNN)In Cape Town, South Africa, they're calling it "Day Zero" -- the day when the taps run dry.

City officials had recently said that day would come on April 22. This week, they moved up the date to April 12.

So how did this happen? How does a major city in the developed world just run dry?

It's been a slow-motion crisis, exacerbated by three factors:

Starting February 1, residents will only be allowed to use 50 liters, or a little over 13 gallons, of water per person, per day.

Water levels at dams supplying the city have dropped 1.4% in the last week, and video taken Tuesday of the city's largest dam, Theewaterskloof, shows an almost-barren reservoir bed.

Some who have money to leave Cape Town until the crisis subsides are doing so. Darryn Ten plans on doing just that.

But there are those who can't -- the elderly, disabled and the impoverished.

"They don't have the money to buy water," Verbist told CNN.

Maybe 1 or 2 of the 12 billionaires that have 87% of the world's wealth can help out.

"Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost".
-Thomas Jefferson
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Reply #2 posted 01/25/18 11:43am

SuperFurryAnim
al

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Scary for the people there. Pray for rain.

God has a plan. Trust the plan.
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Reply #3 posted 01/25/18 11:51am

luv4u

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Do what Saudi Arabia does. They use sea water. Clean out salt and other impurities and make it into drinking water.

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Reply #4 posted 01/25/18 1:05pm

RodeoSchro

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luv4u said:

Do what Saudi Arabia does. They use sea water. Clean out salt and other impurities and make it into drinking water.



If they can get that done in 10 weeks, all their problems are solved! But I don't think they can do it in 10 weeks.

This situation really scares me.

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Reply #5 posted 01/25/18 1:06pm

RodeoSchro

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SuperFurryAnimal said:

Scary for the people there. Pray for rain.


As always, prayer is vital.

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Reply #6 posted 01/26/18 7:15am

DiminutiveRock
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Drought sad it's awful.

"'Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.'' - Thomas Jefferson
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Reply #7 posted 01/26/18 8:49am

13cjk13

RodeoSchro said:

SuperFurryAnimal said:

Scary for the people there. Pray for rain.


As always, prayer is vital.

Thoughts, as well.

"Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost".
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Reply #8 posted 01/26/18 9:07am

2freaky4church
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You all are making fun of them.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #9 posted 01/28/18 12:54am

midnightmover

This is climate change in action. More droughts, more floods, more extreme weird weather in general. We are on a runaway train heading downhill.

We will see more wars and more refugees as a consequence of these environmental stresses. We're already seeing it (Syria for example, where a historic drought drove farmers to abandon their land).

Our squandering of groundwater and other finite resources is also going to come back to bite us.

“The man who never looks into a newspaper is better informed than he who reads them, inasmuch as he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors.”
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Reply #10 posted 01/28/18 10:20am

2freaky4church
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And they are not a shithole country.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #11 posted 01/28/18 11:20am

luv4u

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DiminutiveRocker said:

Drought sad it's awful.


Drought is awful any where in the world.


Edmonton, AB - canada

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REAL MUSIC by REAL MUSICIANS - Prince
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Reply #12 posted 01/28/18 11:39am

2freaky4church
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Canada is hoarding the water. smile.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #13 posted 01/28/18 11:49am

luv4u

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2freaky4church1 said:

Canada is hoarding the water. smile.


When was the last time you looked at a map of the world??? disbelief

Edmonton, AB - canada

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REAL MUSIC by REAL MUSICIANS - Prince
"I kind of wish there was a reason for Prince to make the site crash more" ~~ Ben
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Reply #14 posted 01/28/18 12:36pm

2freaky4church
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omg

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #15 posted 02/05/18 12:32am

Flo6

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I'm going there in 2 weeks eek Scary...

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Reply #16 posted 02/05/18 6:50am

RodeoSchro

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Flo6 said:

I'm going there in 2 weeks eek Scary...



Be prepared. You might not have access to very much water, as it's being heavily rationed among Cape Town citizens right now.

Honestly, I'm kind of surprised they are letting people travel to Cape Town. They need all the water for their citizens; out-of-towners just use more water.

Be careful.

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Reply #17 posted 02/05/18 3:44pm

Flo6

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Thank you for the cautionary note. I’m just not sure what I can do, I don’t plan to take liters of bottled water with me on the plane lol

I just texted a friend of mine in Cape Town and she wrote back: “Yes there is (a water crisis) but it’s really not that bad. People are making a huge thing out of nothing.” Well, that last concept would’t surprise me too much about CNN smile My travel agent also confirmed they haven’t received any travel notices. Anyway I hope the country will fix its water issue soon for its citizens.

RodeoSchro said:

Flo6 said:

I'm going there in 2 weeks eek Scary...



Be prepared. You might not have access to very much water, as it's being heavily rationed among Cape Town citizens right now.

Honestly, I'm kind of surprised they are letting people travel to Cape Town. They need all the water for their citizens; out-of-towners just use more water.

Be careful.

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Reply #18 posted 02/06/18 9:28am

RodeoSchro

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Flo6 said:

Thank you for the cautionary note. I’m just not sure what I can do, I don’t plan to take liters of bottled water with me on the plane lol

I just texted a friend of mine in Cape Town and she wrote back: “Yes there is (a water crisis) but it’s really not that bad. People are making a huge thing out of nothing.” Well, that last concept would’t surprise me too much about CNN smile My travel agent also confirmed they haven’t received any travel notices. Anyway I hope the country will fix its water issue soon for its citizens.

RodeoSchro said:



Be prepared. You might not have access to very much water, as it's being heavily rationed among Cape Town citizens right now.

Honestly, I'm kind of surprised they are letting people travel to Cape Town. They need all the water for their citizens; out-of-towners just use more water.

Be careful.



IIRC, an attitude of "Oh, this is really much ado about nothing" was one of the problems. Whatever you do, make sure you're fully informed and take care.

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Reply #19 posted 02/06/18 11:38am

morningsong

Listening to their news last night, they are doing a lot of what Cali had to do in conserving water, by utilizing their gray water. I'm sure they'll do what we have to do, buy water from the surrounding countries (in their case). Fresh water is really a global problem, people take it for granted.

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Reply #20 posted 02/11/18 12:18am

midnightmover

luv4u said:

Do what Saudi Arabia does. They use sea water. Clean out salt and other impurities and make it into drinking water.

The process you're describing is called desalination. It requires huge amounts of energy (and money) so is impractical in most cases.

Saudi Arabia can do it because they have huge oil reserves on hand.

“The man who never looks into a newspaper is better informed than he who reads them, inasmuch as he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors.”
- Thomas Jefferson
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Reply #21 posted 02/11/18 2:29am

deebee

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The drought is certainly playing a part (and climate change a likely part in that), but I do rather suspect this situation reaching crisis point has much to do with politics. It's not beyond the wit of man to get water to people in a major metropolitan centre, after all; and there is water in the country, so it's a matter of distribution more than supply.

This Reuters article suggests a lack of cooperation between central government and the administration in the province, motivated by political rivalry. I wouldn't be surprised to learn of diversion of funds, etc. Simple economic issues of increased prices for acquiring additional water wouldn't surprise me, either.

It's kind of a pet bugbear of mine: we always miss the economic and political dimensions of how people acquire important goods like food and water, so when we see things like famine emerge in the world, we think there must be a simple lack of supply (or too much demand, i.e. 'overpopulation'). But most of the time, when one sees extreme scarcity appear in the world, it's as a result of political antagonisms or rocketing prices keeping essential goods beyond the reach of the poor - as in Yemen at the moment. In the 80s, people neglected to cover the political and economic causes so as not to interfere with the aid effort ("feed the world!", etc); now, we neglect them to focus attention solely on climate change. Both are important.

"Not everything that is faced can be changed; but nothing can be changed until it is faced." - James Baldwin
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Reply #22 posted 02/11/18 3:04am

midnightmover

deebee said:

The drought is certainly playing a part (and climate change a likely part in that), but I do rather suspect this situation reaching crisis point has much to do with politics. It's not beyond the wit of man to get water to people in a major metropolitan centre, after all; and there is water in the country, so it's a matter of distribution more than supply.

This Reuters article suggests a lack of cooperation between central government and the administration in the province, motivated by political rivalry. I wouldn't be surprised to learn of diversion of funds, etc. Simple economic issues of increased prices for acquiring additional water wouldn't surprise me, either.

It's kind of a pet bugbear of mine: we always miss the economic and political dimensions of how people acquire important goods like food and water, so when we see things like famine emerge in the world, we think there must be a simple lack of supply (or too much demand, i.e. 'overpopulation'). But most of the time, when one sees extreme scarcity appear in the world, it's as a result of political antagonisms or rocketing prices keeping essential goods beyond the reach of the poor - as in Yemen at the moment. In the 80s, people neglected to cover the political and economic causes so as not to interfere with the aid effort ("feed the world!", etc); now, we neglect them to focus attention solely on climate change. Both are important.

The issues you're describing here have probably been going on forever. What's different now is that you have an unprecedented drought. That is the main issue.

“The man who never looks into a newspaper is better informed than he who reads them, inasmuch as he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors.”
- Thomas Jefferson
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Reply #23 posted 02/11/18 3:45am

deebee

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midnightmover said:

deebee said:

The drought is certainly playing a part (and climate change a likely part in that), but I do rather suspect this situation reaching crisis point has much to do with politics. It's not beyond the wit of man to get water to people in a major metropolitan centre, after all; and there is water in the country, so it's a matter of distribution more than supply.

This Reuters article suggests a lack of cooperation between central government and the administration in the province, motivated by political rivalry. I wouldn't be surprised to learn of diversion of funds, etc. Simple economic issues of increased prices for acquiring additional water wouldn't surprise me, either.

It's kind of a pet bugbear of mine: we always miss the economic and political dimensions of how people acquire important goods like food and water, so when we see things like famine emerge in the world, we think there must be a simple lack of supply (or too much demand, i.e. 'overpopulation'). But most of the time, when one sees extreme scarcity appear in the world, it's as a result of political antagonisms or rocketing prices keeping essential goods beyond the reach of the poor - as in Yemen at the moment. In the 80s, people neglected to cover the political and economic causes so as not to interfere with the aid effort ("feed the world!", etc); now, we neglect them to focus attention solely on climate change. Both are important.

The issues you're describing here have probably been going on forever. What's different now is that you have an unprecedented drought. That is the main issue.

Well, that's an issue, certainly, and it puts additional strain into the system - I have no desire not to acknowledge that. But to stick rigidly to a Malthusian conception in which there are goods on one side of the equation and people on the other, such that any scarity must be down to an imbalance, is, I think, to misrepresent how all of us acquire our goods. If you think about how you acquired the water you've drunk or washed in today, there were a host of intervening economic and political factors that had to be in place to bring it to your tap.

Drought alone can't account for why a major metropolitan centre doesn't have a reasonable supply of water. After all, as noted, there is water in the country. And there is water in neighbouring countries, so what we must be dealing with is an issue of distribution rather than mere supply. And that accords with what is, by now, well known about issues of extreme scarcity (e.g. famine) around the world.

I'd be interested in knowing how the human and environmental factors interact in this case. For example, dwindling supply in that immediate locale doesn't explain why other sources of water are not being drawn on from elsewhere, for example by buying in or redistributing water from other provinces, or indeed from neighbouring countries, as a government has the capacity to organise. It's true that the dwindling supply might have pushed the price up, making it expensive for even a government to acquire, but that's still an issue of political economy. But that's a richer conception, and it would invite us to ask questions about whose bank accounts have to be fed first before the budget is used to bring goods to people, or, indeed, what public spending commitments the government is hemmed-in by; or, indeed, as seems to be a factor here, what are the political antagonisms that are sabotaging cooperation between different levels of government. We miss all of that if we simply 'talk about the weather'.

[Edited 2/11/18 3:58am]

"Not everything that is faced can be changed; but nothing can be changed until it is faced." - James Baldwin
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Reply #24 posted 02/11/18 3:56am

deebee

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One other point: issues of political economy are far from timeless, and most arrangements have almost certainly not "been going on forever." The privatisation of water resources in Latin America, for example, began only in the 1990s, and was a condition that came as part of a package of reforms imposed by international finance institutions (the IMF and the World Bank), along with strict limits on public spending, meaning cuts to subsidies, etc. If we had approached the 'water wars' that eventually broke out in that region purely through the lens of environmental scarcity - as the profiteers would no doubt have encouraged us to - we'd have missed all of those issues relating not just to natural supply, but of the mechanisms that connect goods with people (e.g. markets, public provision, etc), and frequently do so very unevenly.

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Reply #25 posted 02/11/18 4:17am

deebee

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luv4u said:

Do what Saudi Arabia does. They use sea water. Clean out salt and other impurities and make it into drinking water.

That's being urgently posited as the crisis develops. It would appear that the government has preferred to use strategies of using dams to collect water and managing demand through water tariffs, failing to recognise that, in not addressing overall supply, this left the city vulnerable in the event of serious drought. The political calculation was that the risk of coming unstuck was low, so investment in desalination to address the problem on the supply side was kicked into the future. They may well have to give that strategy a rethink.
http://www.globalwaterfor...tions-yes/

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Reply #26 posted 02/11/18 4:41am

midnightmover

deebee said:

midnightmover said:

The issues you're describing here have probably been going on forever. What's different now is that you have an unprecedented drought. That is the main issue.

Well, that's an issue, certainly, and it puts additional strain into the system - I have no desire not to acknowledge that. But to stick rigidly to a Malthusian conception in which there are goods on one side of the equation and people on the other, such that any scarity must be down to an imbalance, is, I think, to misrepresent how all of us acquire our goods. If you think about how you acquired the water you've drunk or washed in today, there were a host of intervening economic and political factors that had to be in place to bring it to your tap.

Drought alone can't account for why a major metropolitan centre doesn't have a reasonable supply of water. After all, as noted, there is water in the country. And there is water in neighbouring countries, so what we must be dealing with is an issue of distribution rather than mere supply. And that accords with what is, by now, well known about issues of extreme scarcity (e.g. famine) around the world.

I'd be interested in knowing how the human and environmental factors interact in this case. For example, dwindling supply in that immediate locale doesn't explain why other sources of water are not being drawn on from elsewhere, for example by buying in or redistributing water from other provinces, or indeed from neighbouring countries, as a government has the capacity to organise. It's true that the dwindling supply might have pushed the price up, making it expensive for even a government to acquire, but that's still an issue of political economy. But that's a richer conception, and it would invite us to ask questions about whose bank accounts have to be fed first before the budget is used to bring goods to people, or, indeed, what public spending commitments the government is hemmed-in by; or, indeed, as seems to be a factor here, what are the political antagonisms that are sabotaging cooperation between different levels of government. We miss all of that if we simply 'talk about the weather'.

[Edited 2/11/18 3:58am]

Not denying any of that, but at the same time when there is a shortage of rainfall here in the UK we have a hosepipe ban. You look at when the hosepipe bans have been called and sure enough, it's always when there has been a period of low rainfall.

I do think the climate is the big issue. The other provinces where they have water may not want to deplete their own reserves in case they need them in the future.

“The man who never looks into a newspaper is better informed than he who reads them, inasmuch as he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods and errors.”
- Thomas Jefferson
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