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Thread started 10/11/17 12:12pm

morningsong

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'Black Americans please stop appropriating African Culture'...

Based on an article written by Zipporah Gene
https://www.thsppl.com/thsppl-articles/2017/4/13/black-america-please-stop-appropriating-african-clothing-and-tribal-marks

rHDijHlDOekO2xLX8L1lSgTFQSOHzzdSRvBQoHYLGuQ.jpg?w=540&s=f60cd8592028c5fe78bd9eff74668413

The picture that started it all. Funny thing is these are native WA not BA.

Kwabena Samuel Nana Ofosu-Ware is a world renowned fashion designer from Ghana.

This “reporter” saw a picture taken in Brooklyn and assumed everyone there was born and raised in america…

What’s “Not Cool” is her divisive tactics against African people. You see we are such One People that she couldn’t even tell the difference by sight.


Afropunk America


afropunk-street-style-outfits.jpg
I love this picture.

20150822_AfropunkDay1_Crowd-People_IMG_1824-1024x683.jpg

people-participate-in-the-annual-afropunk-music-festival-on-august-27-picture-id596727424

This is kind of my answer to why are Black Americas always trying to claim ancient Egypt when they are predominently of West African heritage. They aren't if one is truly paying attention. They are embracing the whole, and projecting the positive as all young people do.



[Edited 10/11/17 12:18pm]

[Edited 10/11/17 18:55pm]

“Do I dare Disturb the universe?”
― T.S. Eliot

“Only by acceptance of the past, can you alter it”
― T.S. Eliot
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Reply #1 posted 10/11/17 1:27pm

paisleypark4

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They were all doing that in the 90's knowing good and well they are from Jamacia Queens.


However if one has done research and figured out where their ancestors are actually from, then I see no wrongdoing of them appropriating their generational cultures dress. If you're part Blackfeet Native wear your symbol with pride, if you're part irish, rock your green.

Mostly, people need to mind their own business. Unless you know everyone's lives then no one has to the right to claim anyone of being fake.

Download all the shit hop that you can for your kids, neices, nephews, and their friends also. That will prevent them from going out and buying it and will prevent some shit hop sales. Every little bit helps - Andy
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemus
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Reply #2 posted 10/11/17 2:12pm

2freaky4church
1

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Afropunk is cool.

"2freaky is a complete stud." DJ
"2freaky is very down." 2Elijah.
"2freaky convinced me to join Antifa: OnlyNDA
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Reply #3 posted 10/11/17 3:13pm

Dasein

Regardless of the spirit of which this thread was created in, yes, Black Americans should definitely
stop appropriating "African Culture" especially since Africa is not a country, but a continent currently
constituted of 54 countries with about 3000 discrete ethnicities which ultimately means terms like
"African Culture", often used by some ignorant folks who think "Africa" is a national and cultural
monolith, really does not mean anything. As the entire history of the continent of African has shown
us, a shared genetic code and complexion does not automatically guarantee cultural or human
solidarity.

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Reply #4 posted 10/11/17 3:26pm

morningsong

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^^Why is that important just for them?




The culture of Europe is rooted in the art, architecture, music, literature, and philosophy that originated from the European cultural region.[1] European culture is largely rooted in what is often referred to as its "common cultural heritage".[2]


What differentiates Europeans from Americans: the cultural gap across the Atlantic
https://www.eupedia.com/europe/cultural_differences_europe_usa.shtml

“Do I dare Disturb the universe?”
― T.S. Eliot

“Only by acceptance of the past, can you alter it”
― T.S. Eliot
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Reply #5 posted 10/11/17 3:28pm

OnlyNDaUsa

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the call for one group to NOT appropriate some aspect of another culture is itself bigotry...


I think it is appropriate to appropriately appropriate appropriate aspects of an appropriate cultue

With Love, Honor & Respect for all of you...no matter how I argue or disagree my heart is full of love for you all...
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Reply #6 posted 10/11/17 3:35pm

Dasein

morningsong said:

^^Why is that important just for them?



The culture of Europe is rooted in the art, architecture, music, literature, and philosophy that originated from the European cultural region.[1] European culture is largely rooted in what is often referred to as its "common cultural heritage".[2]


What differentiates Europeans from Americans: the cultural gap across the Atlantic
https://www.eupedia.com/europe/cultural_differences_europe_usa.shtml


But, who said it was important just for Black Americans? Who made that claim? And, please
tell me what is precisely the "common cultural heritage" of Africa as a whole?

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Reply #7 posted 10/11/17 4:03pm

morningsong

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Dasein said:

morningsong said:

^^Why is that important just for them?



The culture of Europe is rooted in the art, architecture, music, literature, and philosophy that originated from the European cultural region.[1] European culture is largely rooted in what is often referred to as its "common cultural heritage".[2]


What differentiates Europeans from Americans: the cultural gap across the Atlantic
https://www.eupedia.com/europe/cultural_differences_europe_usa.shtml


But, who said it was important just for Black Americans? Who made that claim? And, please
tell me what is precisely the "common cultural heritage" of Africa as a whole?



You are. You didn't say Americans, you specified Black Americans.

And I would imagine it's the same as the common european culture which as you see has it's own wikipedia page with definition, obviously it's a thing.

“Do I dare Disturb the universe?”
― T.S. Eliot

“Only by acceptance of the past, can you alter it”
― T.S. Eliot
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Reply #8 posted 10/11/17 4:12pm

morningsong

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OnlyNDaUsa said:

the call for one group to NOT appropriate some aspect of another culture is itself bigotry...


I think it is appropriate to appropriately appropriate appropriate aspects of an appropriate cultue



I get where your are trying to go. And that's just too much for one mouthful because of an history involved in on group of people appropriating another group of peoples culture. One size does not fit all. But there are pictures of white folks at these afro punk events dressed just the same as the black folks so don't get it twisted. I'm talking now that black folks can't even explore the traditions of their continent of origin, they have to be relegated to their country of origin. Is that an issue in the white american community?

“Do I dare Disturb the universe?”
― T.S. Eliot

“Only by acceptance of the past, can you alter it”
― T.S. Eliot
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Reply #9 posted 10/11/17 4:14pm

hausofmoi7

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Dasein said:



morningsong said:


^^Why is that important just for them?




The culture of Europe is rooted in the art, architecture, music, literature, and philosophy that originated from the European cultural region.[1] European culture is largely rooted in what is often referred to as its "common cultural heritage".[2]



What differentiates Europeans from Americans: the cultural gap across the Atlantic
https://www.eupedia.com/europe/cultural_differences_europe_usa.shtml





But, who said it was important just for Black Americans? Who made that claim? And, please
tell me what is precisely the "common cultural heritage" of Africa as a whole?


Are you opposed to Pan Africanism?
Or the concept of a unified movement of LGBTI people?

.
[Edited 10/11/17 16:21pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #10 posted 10/11/17 4:20pm

morningsong

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Pan African Space Station lands in Mexico City

pass

From 4 October – 26 November 2017, the Pan African Space Station (PASS) will land at Museo Tamayo, Mexico City. For 8 weeks, the PASS studio will function as “ecole du soir” (evening school) – a meeting place, a classroom, and laboratory where different worlds will converge. The radio programming explores the ancient supercontinent of Gondwana, contemporary South Atlantic exchanges and Afro-Mexican cultures – it is also a public research platform toward a forthcoming edition of the Chimurenga Chronic on these …

“Do I dare Disturb the universe?”
― T.S. Eliot

“Only by acceptance of the past, can you alter it”
― T.S. Eliot
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Reply #11 posted 10/11/17 4:39pm

morningsong

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As the power of globalization continues to weaken boundaries of statehood, many young people in Africa are increasingly becoming aware of their own political and economic environment. It is in this regard that pan-Africanism has found a viable niche for renewal in the 21st century among an educated grouping of middle-class Africans.

Rather than focusing only on identity, this “˜new’ pan-Africanism is also a call for democracy, good governance and economic development. The renewal of this pan-African attitude is manifested through increased intra-African trade, increased exchanges within Africa’s universities, continent-wide calls for good governance and the ubiquitous and growing membership of pan-Africanist groups on social media platforms.

Dreaming of a brighter future, most young people are tired of dictatorial leaders who have clung to power since independence. Recently in Burkina Faso, many people rose up against former president Compaoré, eventually forcing him to exit from power. In Tunisia, young people rose up against decades of repression and poor governance under President Ben Ali.

The quest for freedom amongst African youth led to the establishment of associations such as “Y’en a Marre” in Senegal, “Balai Citoyen” in Burkina Faso, “Filimbi” and “La Lucha” in the DRC and “Ca Suffit comme ca” in Gabon and the Pan African Youth Union (PYU) which operates under the AU with a specific mandate of gathering and rallying young Africans to realize the organisation’s ideals.


The level of intra-African trade has increased both in nominal and real terms. In nominal terms, the level of intra-African trade was $32 billion in 2000 and $130 billion in 2011. In real terms (at constant 2000 prices) intra-African trade increased from $32 billion in 2000 to $54 billion in 2011.. See UNCTAD, Intra-African trade: unlocking private sector dynamism, Africa report 2013, 2013, p. 125.


http://africanarguments.org/2015/06/30/the-rise-and-paradoxes-of-pan-africanism-today/

“Do I dare Disturb the universe?”
― T.S. Eliot

“Only by acceptance of the past, can you alter it”
― T.S. Eliot
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Reply #12 posted 10/11/17 4:51pm

214

Why all this is always so important to you, cultural identity, i can't see the importance of any of that.

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Reply #13 posted 10/11/17 4:58pm

Dasein

morningsong said:

Dasein said:


But, who said it was important just for Black Americans? Who made that claim? And, please
tell me what is precisely the "common cultural heritage" of Africa as a whole?



You are. You didn't say Americans, you specified Black Americans.

And I would imagine it's the same as the common european culture which as you see has it's own wikipedia page with definition, obviously it's a thing.


You are putting words in my mouth (again, for the third time) and ignoring context. I never said
that it was solely important for Black Americans to not appropriate "African Culture" or that Black
Americans are the only ethnicity/group of people who shouldn't appropriate an "African Culture"
or any culture. And, the reason why I'm referring only to us is because the thread is entitled:
"Black Americans please stop appropriating African Culture." So, I'm going to ask that you stop
constructing these strawman arguments and pay attention to the context you established.

Regarding your comment about Europe: it's purposefully deflective and reveals you not viewing
Europe perspicaciously for I can rattle off two or three empires throughout history that united
large swaths of the small European continent which was and remains one of the most ethnically
homogenous continents in this world while Africa was and remains the most ethnically diverse
continent which never saw any unifying empire similar to what we saw in Europe. You are compar-
ing apples to oranges. When people deflect, it's usually because they don't know what they are
talking about and/or are struggling with remaining coherent and cogent within a debate.

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Reply #14 posted 10/11/17 5:04pm

Dasein

hausofmoi7 said:

Dasein said:


But, who said it was important just for Black Americans? Who made that claim? And, please
tell me what is precisely the "common cultural heritage" of Africa as a whole?

Are you opposed to Pan Africanism? Or the concept of a unified movement of LGBTI people? . [Edited 10/11/17 16:21pm]



The simple answer to both questions is: "fuck, no."

But, what would compel you to ask me those questions? And, what does the LGBTIAQ community
have to do with this discussion?


[Edited 10/11/17 17:04pm]

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Reply #15 posted 10/11/17 5:18pm

Dasein

morningsong said:

OnlyNDaUsa said:

the call for one group to NOT appropriate some aspect of another culture is itself bigotry...


I think it is appropriate to appropriately appropriate appropriate aspects of an appropriate cultue



I get where your are trying to go. And that's just too much for one mouthful because of an history involved in on group of people appropriating another group of peoples culture. One size does not fit all. But there are pictures of white folks at these afro punk events dressed just the same as the black folks so don't get it twisted. I'm talking now that black folks can't even explore the traditions of their continent of origin, they have to be relegated to their country of origin. Is that an issue in the white american community?


You are doing two things: you constructed a strawman argument because nobody in this thread has claimed;
and I do not remember one organization ever claiming that "black folks can't even explore the traditions of their
continent of origin, they have to be relegated to their country of origin." You are making that argument up out
of thin air.


The second thing you are doing is moving the goalposts: this thread is obviously an extension of the
Kemet thread, where my claim was that most Black Americans, who are of west African stock, cannot
arbitrarily make any cultural connection to those east African civilizations of ancient Egypt and Nubia
simply because they were "African." You were never talking about the continent of Africa in that
thread. Instead, I was the only one who pointed out that Africa was a continent. And, up until I alone
reminded you and others in this thread too that Africa was not a country but a continent, you weren't
talking about that either but referring to 54 countries and 3000 ethnic groups as one thing ("African
culture").






[Edited 10/11/17 17:20pm]

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Reply #16 posted 10/11/17 5:20pm

morningsong

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Dasein said:

morningsong said:



You are. You didn't say Americans, you specified Black Americans.

And I would imagine it's the same as the common european culture which as you see has it's own wikipedia page with definition, obviously it's a thing.


You are putting words in my mouth (again, for the third time) and ignoring context. I never said
that it was solely important for Black Americans to not appropriate "African Culture" or that Black
Americans are the only ethnicity/group of people who shouldn't appropriate an "African Culture"
or any culture. And, the reason why I'm referring only to us is because the thread is entitled:
"Black Americans please stop appropriating African Culture." So, I'm going to ask that you stop
constructing these strawman arguments and pay attention to the context you established.

Regarding your comment about Europe: it's purposefully deflective and reveals you not viewing
Europe perspicaciously for I can rattle off two or three empires throughout history that united
large swaths of the small European continent which was and remains one of the most ethnically
homogenous continents in this world while Africa was and remains the most ethnically diverse
continent which never saw any unifying empire similar to what we saw in Europe. You are compar-
ing apples to oranges. When people deflect, it's usually because they don't know what they are
talking about and/or are struggling with remaining coherent and cogent within a debate.


Is the title a context I "established"? Did you even read it?

“Do I dare Disturb the universe?”
― T.S. Eliot

“Only by acceptance of the past, can you alter it”
― T.S. Eliot
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Reply #17 posted 10/11/17 5:27pm

Dasein

morningsong said:

Dasein said:


You are putting words in my mouth (again, for the third time) and ignoring context. I never said
that it was solely important for Black Americans to not appropriate "African Culture" or that Black
Americans are the only ethnicity/group of people who shouldn't appropriate an "African Culture"
or any culture. And, the reason why I'm referring only to us is because the thread is entitled:
"Black Americans please stop appropriating African Culture." So, I'm going to ask that you stop
constructing these strawman arguments and pay attention to the context you established.

Regarding your comment about Europe: it's purposefully deflective and reveals you not viewing
Europe perspicaciously for I can rattle off two or three empires throughout history that united
large swaths of the small European continent which was and remains one of the most ethnically
homogenous continents in this world while Africa was and remains the most ethnically diverse
continent which never saw any unifying empire similar to what we saw in Europe. You are compar-
ing apples to oranges. When people deflect, it's usually because they don't know what they are
talking about and/or are struggling with remaining coherent and cogent within a debate.


Is the title a context I "established"? Did you even read it?



eek


Are you dense? I read the title of the thread. And, I read your post, which concludes by stating:


"This is kind of my answer to why are Black Americas {sic}always trying to claim ancient Egypt
when they are predominently of West African heritage. They aren't if one is truly paying attention.
They are embracing the whole, and projecting the positive as all young people do."

So, yes, when you clicked on "create thread topic" and used the phrase "Black Americans" and
ended your post with that very same phrase, then my post was certainly only going to refer to
that particular group of people.



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Reply #18 posted 10/11/17 5:37pm

morningsong

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Did you read the continuation sentence within the body of the OP?

“Do I dare Disturb the universe?”
― T.S. Eliot

“Only by acceptance of the past, can you alter it”
― T.S. Eliot
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Reply #19 posted 10/11/17 6:03pm

hausofmoi7

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Dasein said:



hausofmoi7 said:


Dasein said:



But, who said it was important just for Black Americans? Who made that claim? And, please
tell me what is precisely the "common cultural heritage" of Africa as a whole?



Are you opposed to Pan Africanism? Or the concept of a unified movement of LGBTI people? . [Edited 10/11/17 16:21pm]



The simple answer to both questions is: "fuck, no."

But,


[Edited 10/11/17 17:04pm]


Cool. We agree.

I brought up the LGBT community because some people oppose Pan Africanism and then will turn around and support the concept of LGBT self determination and quest for equality and justice.
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #20 posted 10/11/17 6:25pm

2elijah

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morningsong said:



Dasein said:




morningsong said:


^^Why is that important just for them?




The culture of Europe is rooted in the art, architecture, music, literature, and philosophy that originated from the European cultural region.[1] European culture is largely rooted in what is often referred to as its "common cultural heritage".[2]



What differentiates Europeans from Americans: the cultural gap across the Atlantic
https://www.eupedia.com/europe/cultural_differences_europe_usa.shtml





But, who said it was important just for Black Americans? Who made that claim? And, please
tell me what is precisely the "common cultural heritage" of Africa as a whole?





You are. You didn't say Americans, you specified Black Americans.

And I would imagine it's the same as the common european culture which as you see has it's own wikipedia page with definition, obviously it's a thing.


Afropunk festival is cool. It brings together Black cultures from all over to celebrate music. Unfortunately, there are many within the Black community who convinced themselves that they have some authority, to dictate to Black Americans, how they should define themselves and their cultures, as if we were all raised under the same roof, culture, religious beliefs, live the same lifestyle and have the same interests. Those are people with ignorant mindsets, who project prejudice ideology and limitations among specific groups. Don't fall for their bs.
[Edited 10/11/17 19:42pm]
'Trump voters got Hoodwinked by Trump' popcorn coke
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Reply #21 posted 10/11/17 7:24pm

hausofmoi7

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W.E.B. Du Bois – The father of modern Pan-Africanism?

http://newafricanmagazine...fricanism/

As 2013 comes to a close, we remember Dr William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (better known as W.E.B. Du Bois), the father of modern pan-Africanism and a leading African-American intellectual of the 20th century, who died 50 years ago in Ghana. Though his death was barely noticed by the world, coming a day before the 28 August 1963 March on Washington at which Martin Luther King gave his “I Have a Dream” speech, Du Bois still stands tall in the memory of the people his life affected in the USA and around the world, Leslie Gordon Goffe reports from New York.
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #22 posted 10/11/17 7:39pm

free2bFreeda2

🔒🔒🔒🔒🔒
imo this is an offensive thread.
it's that same ole hostess twinkie mind set with a shelf life of forever.
it's totally maddening when some imbecile makes sn umbrella statement and overtly thinks in terms that (all)'black americans" are one unit with no apparent individuality.
😒
how dare someone would have the audacity to address and define a race of people as though they are weak and can only think or come to conclusions as a group.
it's so typical that someone with a weak mind would have the perception that "all black african americans think alike in today's world.
in addition there is no sense of respect for the independent thought process of the said.
thinking that we are bound by group mentality is the perception of an idiot. for anyone to think that there is a lack of cultural diversity within non whites is so colonial. then to add more insult there is a command to "stop" whatever.
finally it would be almost slanderous for me to say or post the following
'white americans please stop appropriating colonial culture'
imo this thread reeks of the smell of inane trickery and transparent deception.
please grow the *uck up
rolleyes
[Edited 10/11/17 21:02pm]
👀 "the past was erased. the erasure was forgotten. the lie became the truth." 👤>: “no one has done more than trump to prove white people are not superior”Sergeant La David T Johnson 🌼
: https://www.google.com/am...com/humor/
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Reply #23 posted 10/11/17 7:52pm

hausofmoi7

avatar

free2bFreeda2 said:

🔒🔒🔒🔒🔒

Well arent you just the 'the Grinch who stole Kwanzaa'
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #24 posted 10/11/17 8:06pm

hausofmoi7

avatar

http://newafricanmagazine...fricanism/

Excerpts from the article listed above covering the history and the roots of Pan Africanism ideology.

"A founder of America’s oldest and largest civil rights organisation, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Du Bois found refuge in Ghana in 1961 after being hounded out of America by the US government because he demanded not just civil rights for African-Americans but freedom for Africa and an end to capitalism, which Du Bois said was the cause of racism and all human misery.


By 1909, Du Bois had founded the NAACP and was at the forefront of the fight for civil rights. He was concerned not only with race but also with class. In 1911, he became a member of the Socialist Party of America. Du Bois was concerned, too, with colonialism in Africa. In 1919, he organised the first Pan-African Congress, which called for an end to European domination.

His interest in Africa was not new. In 1900, Du Bois had attended the Pan-African Conference in London and given a stirring closing address. “Let not the natives of Africa be sacrificed,” he said, “to the greed of gold, their liberties taken away....”


....Packed and ready to say goodbye to America in 1961, Du Bois, in a mighty act of defiance, joined the Communist Party of the United States. “Capitalism cannot reform, it is doomed to self-destruction,” Du Bois said before boarding a plane to Ghana. “Communism … this is the only way of human life.” In this, later events and the modern world have proved him utterly wrong. His stance made him a target of attack in both the white and black press in the USA. “Du Bois paints in red” was a 1961 headline in the black newspaper, The Chicago Defender. But Du Bois was already far away in Ghana. There, he found a kind of peace he had never enjoyed in his American birthplace.




.
[b][Edited 10/11/17 20:18pm]

"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #25 posted 10/11/17 9:04pm

free2bFreeda2

hausofmoi7 said:

free2bFreeda2 said:

🔒🔒🔒🔒🔒

Well arent you just the 'the Grinch who stole Kwanzaa'

i feel pity for you..
👀 "the past was erased. the erasure was forgotten. the lie became the truth." 👤>: “no one has done more than trump to prove white people are not superior”Sergeant La David T Johnson 🌼
: https://www.google.com/am...com/humor/
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Reply #26 posted 10/11/17 9:38pm

hausofmoi7

avatar

free2bFreeda2 said:

hausofmoi7 said:


Well arent you just the 'the Grinch who stole Kwanzaa'

i feel pity for you..

I don't know you and have no interest to.
so whatever I said that angered you I'm sure I will double down on at some point, so engage me then.
Otherwise flip u



.
[Edited 10/11/17 21:39pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #27 posted 10/11/17 9:40pm

morningsong

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Self determination is believing you can control your own destiny. Self-determination is a combination of attitudes and abilities that lead people to set goals for themselves, and to take the initiative to reach these goals.
“Do I dare Disturb the universe?”
― T.S. Eliot

“Only by acceptance of the past, can you alter it”
― T.S. Eliot
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Reply #28 posted 10/12/17 3:53am

Dasein

morningsong said:

Did you read the continuation sentence within the body of the OP?


Of course I did.


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Reply #29 posted 10/12/17 3:54am

hausofmoi7

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"Pan Africanism represents the complexities of black political and intellectual thought over two hundred years. What constitutes Pan-Africanism, what one might include in a Pan-African movement often changes according to whether the focus is on politics, ideology, organizations, or culture. Pan-Africanism actually reflects a range of political views. At a basic level, it is a belief that African peoples, both on the African continent and in the Diaspora, share not merely a common history, but a common destiny. This sense of interconnected pasts and futures has taken many forms, especially in the creation of political institutions".
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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