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Reply #30 posted 08/03/17 5:14am

hausofmoi7

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People are being violently targeted by opposition supporters and protestors for looking like "Chavistas". Dark skin people are being targeted as they are viewed as supporters of the government and the Bolivarian revolution.

http://www.reuters.com/ar...SKBN18V0XL

Orlando Figuera, 22, died on Sunday after having been set ablaze during a protest in affluent east Caracas last month, the state prosecutor's office said in a statement, pushing the total deaths in unrest since early April to at least 65.

The government says Figuera was targeted for being "Chavista," or a supporter of late leftist Hugo Chavez, because he had dark skin and looked poor.





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[Edited 8/3/17 5:16am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #31 posted 08/03/17 10:05pm

hausofmoi7

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Australian Trade Unions have pledged support for the government of Venezuela and the Bolivarian revolution.

http://www.venezuelasolid...venezuela/

Australian trade union solidarity with Venezuela

Resolution adopted at the Maritime Union of Australia (MUA) Sydney Branch Meeting, 25/7/17:

The MUA Sydney branch resolves:

To pledge our resolute solidarity with the people of Venezuela and their Bolivarian Revolution.

To reject the intervention of the US and other capitalist powers in Venezuela.

To oppose the attacks by violent, fascist gangs of the right-wing opposition in that country.

To call on the Australian labour movement to express solidarity with the Venezuelan people, and against right-wing attacks on Venezuelan democracy.

To call on the government and parliament of Australia to dissociate itself from US intervention in Venezuela’s internal affairs, and to express full support for a peaceful resolution of the current crisis in Venezuela.

To support the upcoming action against Trump’s proposed sanctions on Venezuela this Saturday, July 29, 12 noon at Sydney Town Hall

Carried Unanimously

——–

Resolution adopted at the Construction Forestry Mining Energy Union (CFMEU) Victoria Branch Meeting, 26/7/17:

This CFMEU Branch Meeting resolves:

To pledge our support with the people of Venezuela and their Bolivarian Revolution Socialist Government.

This meeting notes the Venezuelan government is a democratically elected government and we reject the intervention of the US and other capitalist powers in Venezuela.

We call on the Australian labour movement to express solidarity with workers in Venezuela and against fascist and violent gangs.

We call on the Australian government to dissociate itself with the US intervention and to work towards a peaceful resolution to this crisis in Venezuela.

Carried Unanimously



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[Edited 8/3/17 22:09pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #32 posted 08/04/17 12:54am

NorthC

Yeah... just like the old communists who used to think Stalin was a great guy... bored2
Don't ever lose your dreams.
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Reply #33 posted 08/04/17 1:43am

hausofmoi7

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NorthC said:

Yeah... just like the old communists who used to think Stalin was a great guy... bored2


Maduro is a socialist and that's where the comparison to Stalin ends.
The Bolivarian revolution is a socialist movement which has upheld the rights and the progress of indigenous movements in Venezuela. The Bolivarian revolution also addresses issues facing people of African decent in the country. All this has angered capitalists and racists alike. Capitalists and racists have throughout history always been a united force.
When you are on the same side as Donald Trump and right wing racist thugs, good luck with that.




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[Edited 8/4/17 4:10am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #34 posted 08/04/17 1:39pm

NorthC

Okay, the Stalin comparison was a bit far fetched, but it shows how people, like the Australians you mention, can be blinded by ideology. If we're socialists, then we have to support all socialists no matter what and anybody who thinks otherwise is a mothafuckin damn capitalist!!! The fact that Maduro has opposition leaders put in jail, fires at protesters (who are not capitalists, but ordinary people), installed a "constituente" that put parliament out of power, well, of course, it all doesn't matter. Because he is a socialist. So everybody who thinks different is automatically a capitalist. Case closed. It's all black and white, good and evil, so go on, Nicolas, hausofmoi and the Australian unions support you, so what have you got to lose...
Don't ever lose your dreams.
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Reply #35 posted 08/04/17 5:29pm

hausofmoi7

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NorthC said:

Okay, the Stalin comparison was a bit far fetched, but it shows how people, like the Australians you mention, can be blinded by ideology. If we're socialists, then we have to support all socialists no matter what and anybody who thinks otherwise is a mothafuckin damn capitalist!!! The fact that Maduro has opposition leaders put in jail, fires at protesters (who are not capitalists, but ordinary people), installed a "constituente" that put parliament out of power, well, of course, it all doesn't matter. Because he is a socialist. So everybody who thinks different is automatically a capitalist. Case closed. It's all black and white, good and evil, so go on, Nicolas, hausofmoi and the Australian unions support you, so what have you got to lose...

Nicholas Maduro is president because he won elections.
The constituent assembly was voted for, not "installed". I previously mentioned that this is a part of the Venezuelan political process for a sitting government to re write it's constitution with members of the public if it wins a vote to do so.
Simply because America does not allow for its own constitution to be updated by its people within its own political system doesn't make it"undemocratic" in Venezuela . It makes it un american, un American as gun control and universal healthcare and that's perfectly fine.



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[Edited 8/4/17 18:41pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #36 posted 08/04/17 5:56pm

hausofmoi7

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NorthC said:

It's all black and white, good and evil, so go on, Nicolas, hausofmoi and the Australian unions support you, so what have you got to lose...

What people don't want to report, including the "left" is that the protestors are a minority that are right wing from the upper and middle class areas that hold racist white supremacist views. They are also being propped up by the CIA and elitists for thier own economic interests.
It's fucked up.


By the way the government has support of much of the population.
However the supporters of the government and thier perspective are not viewed as valuable or worthy as those of the opposition and its protestors by the international western media and much of the international left. Not surprised since both have continued to fail such groups and movement's within thier own countries.


Indigenous Communities March to Defend Venezuelan Revolution

http://www.telesurtv.net/...-0058.html
Participants said they back the Bolivarian Revolution due to the respect it has always extended to Indigenous peoples.
Indigenous communities representing various nationalities marched through the streets of Caracas Thursday to show their support for the government of Nicolas Maduro and the Bolivarian Revolution in Venezuela.

The groups participating in the demonstration were responding to a call made by the Venezuelan government to develop grassroots solutions to the economic crisis the country is currently facing.

teleSUR's correspondent in Caracas, Iain Bruce, said that the leaders he spoke to back the government due to the respect that has always been extended to Indigenous peoples throughout the Bolivarian Revolution, the political project initiated by the late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez.

“In the past we were always received at the back door, now we're welcomed through the front door,” Noeli Pocaterra, a leader from the Wayuu people, told teleSUR.



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[Edited 8/4/17 20:51pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #37 posted 08/04/17 6:15pm

hausofmoi7

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Venezuelan government have given black lives matter issues political power. most western politicians wouldn't even give lip service to black lives matter, let alone empowering it by institutionalizing the changes that the movement requires.


Venezuela is under attack for asserting that Black lives matter

https://www.greenleft.org...ves-matter
Saturday, June 24, 2017
Andrew King, in an article first published on Truthout, looks at how the Bolivarian Revolution has empowered poor people of African descent, something that has earned it the ire of Venezuela’s predominately white elites and US imperialism.

***

A recent New York Times article, "Targeting Maduro Supporters in Miami," describes the increasingly vocal body of anti-government Venezuelan "exiles" living in the United States who are escalating their agitation and harassment tactics against fellow Venezuelans who support President Nicolas Maduro's socialist government. The Venezuelan opposition has enjoyed the unconditional support of the US government and mass media – conservative and liberal pundits alike – who simultaneously demonise and undermine the nation's democratically elected government as a brutal dictatorship while portraying the US-funded and often violent opposition as peaceful, pro-democracy, anti-government protesters.

It is true that the current economic situation in Venezuela is quite dire; the nation is currently experiencing a triple digit inflation rate, and Venezuelans often face long lines to purchase basic commodities. While these challenges are due to a complex array of factors, including an economic war waged against the country along with the plummeting price of oil, The New York Times, The Washington Post, CNN and Fox News alike use an endless barrage of crisis imagery to turn public opinion against Venezuela's government in order to destabilise and ultimately overthrow the socialist administration.

While the mainstream media tend to seek out stories that demonise Maduro's government and glorify the anti-government demonstrators, they do not show the true character of Venezuela's opposition movement nor shed light as to why they oppose the government. Indeed, many dozens of people, including government workers, have been killed in recent years due to the actions of violent right-wing protesters. Powerful media outlets conveniently gloss over what should be headline stories, such as that of Afro-Venezuelan Orlando Figuera. On May 20, the 21-year-old was walking through the government opposition stronghold of Chacao in Caracas when a group of masked anti-government "protesters" accused Figuera of being a government supporter. The mob proceeded to surround Figuera, stab him six times, douse him in gasoline and set him on fire. The young man died later at the hospital. President Nicolas Maduro called this the symbol of hate crimes in Venezuela, noting the racist character of this lynching of a Black Venezuelan. He is the ninth person to be killed at opposition barricades since the violent protests erupted in early April. The same powerful media outlets that routinely decry human rights abuses by Venezuela's government remain largely silent about such racist acts of terrorism by the right-wing opposition.

It is important to note that while the vitriolic right-wing government opposition is concentrated among the white and economically elite elements of the population, the barrios, shanty towns and rural areas that are home to the poor, Indigenous communities and the Afro-Venezuelans have not erupted into protest for the most part because they support the government. In order to understand the roots of the elite opposition's hate and racism toward Black and Indigenous government supporters, one has to understand the history of the presidency that preceded Maduro's – that of Hugo Chavez.

Hugo Chavez and the Bolivarian Revolution

Decades of failed neoliberal policies and government repression set the stage for Chavez's democratic election in 1998. After taking office, the Chavez government launched a vigorous campaign to combat poverty and social exclusion by redistributing the nation's vast oil wealth to the poor, Indigenous and Afro-Venezuelan sectors of the population. Chavez called this movement against US neoliberal hegemony the "Bolivarian Revolution," inspired by the 19th-century South American independence hero Simón Bolívar. According to Chavez, the ultimate goal of this revolution was to build a 21st-century socialism from below that would be led by the poor, women, Indigenous people and Afro-Venezuelans.

One of the central goals of Venezuela's revolutionary project has been to combat the historical legacy of racism against Indigenous and Afro-Venezuelans. The new constitution created under Chavez advanced the social, cultural and economic rights of Indigenous peoples, Afro-Venezuelans and women, including the recognition of intercultural education. Chavez was the first president in the Americas to openly acknowledge and embrace his Indigenous and African heritage. The privately owned Venezuelan media often referred to him with racist slurs. In 2005, Chavez declared that, "hate against me has a lot to do with racism. Because of my big mouth and curly hair. And I'm so proud to have this mouth and this hair, because it is African." That same year, Chavez created the Presidential Commission for the Prevention and Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination in the Venezuelan Educational System.

The Chavez government used the country's oil wealth to increase social spending and developed revolutionary programs known as "social missions," which have resulted in tremendous social gains for the country's poor and socially excluded sectors, many of which are of African or Indigenous descent. By 2010, government programs had cut poverty in half and extreme poverty was reduced by two-thirds. In 2005, the UN declared the country illiteracy free, after 1.5 million Venezuelans were taught to read and write.

Thousands of Cuban doctors and health professionals were brought in to the country's poor and rural communities, providing millions of citizens with unprecedented access to free health care. Through this program, more than 6,000 community health clinics have been built and millions of free consultations conducted. Other achievements include a massive public housing program that has built over a million housing units since its inception; the redistribution of thousands of communal land titles to Indigenous communities; and a democratisation of the media through an explosion of community radio and television stations.

The South American nation strengthened its commitment to Black lives in 2011 when it passed a historic law banning racial discrimination, which according to the Correo del Orinoco International newspaper, "will establish mechanisms to prevent, respond to, punish and eradicate racial discrimination by any person, group of persons, public authorities, private institutions, and civil, economic, political, cultural, and social organisations." The government also created a new census question that allowed citizens to classify themselves as Afro-Venezuelan.

Solidarity with African Americans

In 2015, President Maduro came to Harlem to speak on a panel with Black leaders, including Opal Tometi, cofounder of Black Lives Matter. This move was reminiscent of Cuban revolutionary leader Fidel Castro's 1964 visit to Harlem to meet with Malcolm X. Several months later, the Black Lives Matter network and other Black North American groups put out a statement denouncing US intervention in Venezuela and expressing their solidarity with Afro-Venezuelans and Indigenous Venezuelans in the wake of the 2015 right-wing National Assembly election victories, which threaten to roll back the social gains of the revolution.

In the letter, the US activists thank Venezuela for its ongoing support of the African American community in the US, dating back to Chavez's offer to send large amounts of aid, including doctors and disaster specialists, to post-Katrina New Orleans. George W. Bush, who largely left the city's Black residents there to drown, turned down the offer. Over the last 12 years, Citgo – the Venezuelan-owned subsidiary company – has provided low-cost heating oil assistance to hundreds of thousands of poor families in 23 states, which have benefited Black residents in the Bronx, Boston, Chicago and Philadelphia, along with other cities. A number of African American leaders, activists and artists such as Danny Glover, Harry Belafonte and Jesse Jackson Jr have travelled to Venezuela, building strong ties of solidarity with Chavez and the Bolivarian revolution, and acknowledging its connection to the Black liberation movement in the US.

Solidarity with Haiti, the Caribbean and Africa

Nowhere perhaps is the Venezuelan government's commitment to solidarity with Black people more evident than in the generous aid and support it gave to the people of Haiti in the wake of the devastating 2010 earthquake, which included thousands of tons of food, medicines, the setting up of relief camps, mobile hospitals and medical personnel and relief workers. In addition, Chavez forgave Haiti's $395 million debt, proclaiming that, "Haiti has no debt with Venezuela – on the contrary, it is Venezuela that has a historic debt with Haiti," due to the fact that it was the newly self-freed Black republic that had given Simon Bolivar arms, ammunition and ships to fight the Spanish in Venezuela, with the promise in return that he would end slavery in his homeland. Venezuela has also forged new ties with African nations by opening 18 new embassies and establishing cooperative health and education agreements.

It is precisely because of the Venezuelan government's audacity to stand up against racist US imperialism – and to unapologetically assert that Black lives matter by empowering poor people of African descent – that it is under constant assault from the white US ruling class and the international corporate media. Thus, it is quite easy to see why, to quote the slain Black radical Prime Minister of Grenada, Maurice Bishop, "Goliath has turned his full attention to David."



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[Edited 8/4/17 20:53pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #38 posted 08/05/17 12:31am

midnightmover

Next year in Venezuela there are elections. If the people of Venezuela want to vote out the government then they can do so. But that is THEIR choice, not the choice of Western imperialists. If you support the forced removal of the democratically elected government (as almost the entire Western elites do) then it is PREPOSTEROUS to lecture anyone else about democracy.

These protesters are CIA-backed middle and upper class kids whose crimes are being completely ignored by Western media, just as the crimes of the Neo-Nazis in the Ukrainian coup of 2014 were also ignored. Incidentally, those Neo Nazis in Ukraine are getting restless now and are turning on the government they brought to power.

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Reply #39 posted 08/05/17 12:54am

NorthC

Yeah yeah, everything that's wrong in the world is all the fault of the big bad USofA. There is no point in having a discussion with people who have such a one sided view. Adios! wave
Don't ever lose your dreams.
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Reply #40 posted 08/05/17 1:31am

midnightmover

NorthC said:

Yeah yeah, everything that's wrong in the world is all the fault of the big bad USofA. There is no point in having a discussion with people who have such a one sided view. Adios! wave

America is the only superpower in the world and they are unashamedly interventionist. It is naive not to recognize that truth.

And there is nothing unreasonable about supporting democracy. It's a sign of how confused people are that they can cheer on the removal of democratically elected governments in places like Ukraine and actually think their position is moral.

I have never once in my lifetime had a government in my country that I supported. They've all basically been corporatist, war-promoters. But the thought of violently removing them has never crossed my mind. But then I live in a country that is not on the CIA's hitlist so no-one ever encouraged me to disrespect democracy in that way.

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Reply #41 posted 08/05/17 1:03pm

NorthC

Right. There is nothing unreasonable about supporting democracy. Donald Trump, like it or not, was democratically elected. Nicolas Maduro was not. Latest news is that the "Constituente" threw out a member of the Supreme Court named Luisa Ortega Diaz. She was critical of the Maduro regime... Yeah, that's democracy working for ya...
Don't ever lose your dreams.
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Reply #42 posted 08/05/17 6:39pm

hausofmoi7

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NorthC said:

Right. There is nothing unreasonable about supporting democracy. Donald Trump, like it or not, was democratically elected. Nicolas Maduro was not.

Maduro won elections! He won them by amassing the highest amount of votes, unlike Trump. So if you want to talk about democracy.
Trump is the antithesis of what the Bolivarian revolution represents. He is white supremacist, imperialist and a murderous war criminal on steroids.



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[Edited 8/5/17 22:29pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #43 posted 08/05/17 9:35pm

hausofmoi7

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Anyone claiming to be concerned about the economic situation in Venezuela due to the global drop in oil prices should also be concerned about the sanctions that the U.S is putting on Venezuela to stop them from being able to trade and sell oil.
Sanctions are designed to hurt the people and overthrow governments.
Just look at the Iraq sanctions of Bill Clinton and Madeline Albright that killed half a million children.
The sanctions by the Trump admin is hoping for some kind of similar result to overthrow the government in Venezuela.
As sanctions are designed to cripple a country it should be viewed as the human rights violation that it is. particularly in a socialist country like Venezuela where sanctions will directly affect its universal health care and many other social services and institutions.


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[Edited 8/5/17 23:11pm]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #44 posted 08/05/17 11:55pm

midnightmover

NorthC said:

Right. There is nothing unreasonable about supporting democracy. Donald Trump, like it or not, was democratically elected. Nicolas Maduro was not. Latest news is that the "Constituente" threw out a member of the Supreme Court named Luisa Ortega Diaz. She was critical of the Maduro regime... Yeah, that's democracy working for ya...

I have never once denied that Donald Trump was democratically elected. On the other hand you have repeatedly (and falsely) claimed that Maduro was not democratically elected. You've aready been corrected on this twice, so your false claim cannot be attributed to ignorance. It can only be attributed to mendacity. Maduro was elected in 2013. The next election is in 2018. If the people want him out then they can do so then.

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Reply #45 posted 08/06/17 3:29am

hausofmoi7

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[Edited 8/6/17 3:51am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #46 posted 08/06/17 3:48am

NorthC

midnightmover said:



NorthC said:


Right. There is nothing unreasonable about supporting democracy. Donald Trump, like it or not, was democratically elected. Nicolas Maduro was not. Latest news is that the "Constituente" threw out a member of the Supreme Court named Luisa Ortega Diaz. She was critical of the Maduro regime... Yeah, that's democracy working for ya...

I have never once denied that Donald Trump was democratically elected. On the other hand you have repeatedly (and falsely) claimed that Maduro was not democratically elected. You've aready been corrected on this twice, so your false claim cannot be attributed to ignorance. It can only be attributed to mendacity. Maduro was elected in 2013. The next election is in 2018. If the people want him out then they can do so then.


Maduro was appointed by Chavez and yes, he won the elections with the smallest possible majority: 50.66%. Venezuela has been deeply divided for a long time.
I made the Trump comparison to show that just because someone is democratically elected, doesn't automatically mean everything they're doing is right. I read lots of criticism on Trump here, yet no one ever says:"But he was democratically elected!" But in the case of Maduro, that somehow makes everything he does allright in your and hausofmoi's eyes. Too many presidents today use the democratic system to kill democracy: Erdogan in Turkey, Orban in Hungary and Maduro in Venezuela. They all act like dictators and when someone protests, they all blame it on a foreign conspiracy and believe that gives them a free hand to use force. That's not democracy.
[Edited 8/6/17 3:57am]
[Edited 8/6/17 4:12am]
[Edited 8/6/17 4:14am]
Don't ever lose your dreams.
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Reply #47 posted 08/06/17 4:32am

hausofmoi7

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NorthC said:

midnightmover said:



NorthC said:


Right. There is nothing unreasonable about supporting democracy. Donald Trump, like it or not, was democratically elected. Nicolas Maduro was not. Latest news is that the "Constituente" threw out a member of the Supreme Court named Luisa Ortega Diaz. She was critical of the Maduro regime... Yeah, that's democracy working for ya...

I have never once denied that Donald Trump was democratically elected. On the other hand you have repeatedly (and falsely) claimed that Maduro was not democratically elected. You've aready been corrected on this twice, so your false claim cannot be attributed to ignorance. It can only be attributed to mendacity. Maduro was elected in 2013. The next election is in 2018. If the people want him out then they can do so then.


Maduro was appointed by Chavez and yes, he won the elections with the smallest possible majority: 50.66%. Venezuela has been deeply divided for a long time.
I made the Trump comparison to show that just because someone is democratically elected, doesn't automatically mean everything they're doing is right. I read lots of criticism on Trump here, yet no one ever says:"But he was democratically elected!" But in the case of Maduro, that somehow makes everything he does allright in your and hausofmoi's eyes. Too many presidents today use the democratic system to kill democracy: Erdogan in Turkey, Orban in Hungary and Maduro in Venezuela. They all act like dictators and when someone protests, they all blame it on a foreign conspiracy and believe that gives them a free hand to use force.
[Edited 8/6/17 3:57am]
[Edited 8/6/17 4:12am]


I don't support whoever or whatever simply because it has majority support,
I do support the Bolivarian revolution and what it stand for and they happen to be democratically elected and in power, so yeah I'm defending it.



You made the claim that the government was not democratically elected, we pointed out that it was.
That doesn't mean we support all democratically elected governments. we will however defend things that the process of democracy puts in place that we do support, Like the Bolivarian revolution.
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #48 posted 08/06/17 4:58am

midnightmover

NorthC said:

midnightmover said:

I have never once denied that Donald Trump was democratically elected. On the other hand you have repeatedly (and falsely) claimed that Maduro was not democratically elected. You've aready been corrected on this twice, so your false claim cannot be attributed to ignorance. It can only be attributed to mendacity. Maduro was elected in 2013. The next election is in 2018. If the people want him out then they can do so then.

Maduro was appointed by Chavez and yes, he won the elections with the smallest possible majority: 50.66%. Venezuela has been deeply divided for a long time. I made the Trump comparison to show that just because someone is democratically elected, doesn't automatically mean everything they're doing is right. I read lots of criticism on Trump here, yet no one ever says:"But he was democratically elected!" But in the case of Maduro, that somehow makes everything he does allright in your and hausofmoi's eyes. Too many presidents today use the democratic system to kill democracy: Erdogan in Turkey, Orban in Hungary and Maduro in Venezuela. They all act like dictators and when someone protests, they all blame it on a foreign conspiracy and believe that gives them a free hand to use force. That's not democracy. [Edited 8/6/17 3:57am] [Edited 8/6/17 4:12am] [Edited 8/6/17 4:14am]

No, we are responding to what is actually going on here, but which you are blissfully unaware of. Behind all this heated coverage lies an unspoken but clear objective. The unspoken objective is to do what they did in Ukraine and remove a democratically elected government. As for what Maduro is doing, please tell me, what is it he's done that is illegal?

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Reply #49 posted 08/06/17 5:04am

hausofmoi7

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http://www.irishexaminer....56064.html

'Venezuela is a different place to the one you read about in international press'

"This constituent assembly was seen as a way of bringing the many diverse interests in Venezuela together in a less heated atmosphere.

On seeing the Tricolour on my credentials, Maria Garcia, a Maduro supporter, says emphatically: “We don’t want a replication of the violence that happened in your country taking place here. The other principal reason why the Chavistas want to draw up a new constitution is to give constitutional status to the social missions that they have embarked upon over the last two decades.

These missions have been the most successful part of the Bolivarian revolution; more than 1.5m social-housing units were built, literacy increased hugely, and poorer people gained access to health care for the first time."



Irish union official Adrian Kane was one of the international observers invited to Venezuela by the National Electoral Council for this weekend’s poll. He tells the Irish Examiner of what he saw in the troubled South American state.

WHEN I flew into Caracas last Thursday afternoon, the airport was unusually quiet.

The Columbian airline, Avianca, had announced, the previous Tuesday, that it was suspending its flights in and out of Venezuela, joining an increasing number of airlines which have suspended flights to Caracas.

Traffic was also light on the main highway that leads to the city centre.

It was the second day of a ‘strike’ called by the opposition.

A strike in Venezuela is different to an industrial dispute in Ireland.

In Caracas, for example, the roads into the wealthier neighbourhoods will be ‘taped off’.

The residents of these areas, some undoubtedly supportive of the action and others intimidated by it, tend not to transgress.

The result is the closure of many businesses, shops, and services.

Meanwhile, on a packed Bolivar Boulevard in central Caracas, the Chavistas were holding their final pre-election rally in an almost carnivalesque atmosphere, prior to the controversial constituent assembly elections, which were held on Sunday.

The following day, the city came back to life as the strike was lifted; traffic increased and the city was choked up with a vast array of cars and trucks, of every shape and vintage.

The BBC, in its Thursday night news broadcast, announced that the government had banned an opposition protest rally, which had been due to take place on Friday.

The opposition is boycotting the constituent assembly elections.

Caracas was tense on Friday, as rumours abounded about some spectacular to be organised by the opposition; police and the national guard had a heavy presence throughout the city, but nothing of note materialised, other than the blocking of some roads around Chacao, a wealthy district in the east of the city.

The American government has told its embassy staff to leave Venezuela, and had threatened further sanctions against the Venezuelan government if the election went ahead on Sunday.

More airlines began to suspend flights.

I received an email, informing me that my return flight to Paris, scheduled for Monday with Air France, had been cancelled.

I began to wonder if it was wise to have come here, as part of an international monitoring delegation, at the request of the Venezuelan CNE (National Electoral Council), the body charged with organising and overseeing Venezuela’s many elections.

Over the last number of years, the narrative has taken root throughout the western world that the government of Venezuela’s president, Nicolas Madura, is becoming increasing dictatorial, suspending freedom of expression and violently clamping down on opposition forces.

Madura’s predecessor, Hugo Chavez, also had a critical press, but if you looked hard enough, you would always find some less critical coverage of his Bolivarian revolution in the western mainstream press.

With Madura, however, the negative commentary is relentless.

In our post-truth world, I try to rationalise what is really going on.

The descriptions in international news reports of a country on the verge of civil war seem at odds with a city that, by Saturday, had returned to its hectic, chaotic, and vibrant self.

So what is actually happening in Venezuela? Is there an objective truth to be found in this country, which is undoubtedly becoming increasingly polarised?
One fact beyond doubt is that inflation is through the roof.

It has soared in the last two years, not quite at Weimar Republic rates, but some commentators estimate it at 800%.

There have been shortages of some foodstuffs and other products, but this has improved in recent months.

However, due to staggering inflation rates and a reorganisation of state subsidies on some staple household products, many families are struggling, particularly the less well-off.

One of the most bizarre criticisms of Maduro’s government is that there is no freedom of expression.

Most of the media, however, both print and television, are privately owned and almost all are critical of the regime.

Of the seven principal papers in Caracas, four are openly hostile to the regime, one is broadly neutral, and two, on the left of the ideological spectrum, are supportive.

The vast majority of television channels are private and are much more popular than the publicly-owned channels, which gain typically less than 10% of the viewing public.

These state-run channels are unashamedly pro-government.

Between April 6 and the beginning of July, when the current round of protests began, 84 people have been killed.

Western media coverage gives the impression that the police are solely responsible.

On further inspection, however, you find a much more complex picture. The attorney general, who has been an outspoken critic of the regime, has attributed 23 deaths to the police and national guard, and 61 to the protestors.

The so-called peaceful protests typically begin in the evening; burning barricades are strung across roads and, as the evening progresses, increasing numbers of shadowy, masked and armed figures tend to emerge.

In studying extended footage of these protests, they are far from peaceful and would not be tolerated by any EU state, and they most certainly would not be tolerated in the US.

More than 500 public buses have been burned.

The spark that has ignited this sharp increase in violence was Maduro’s decision to hold a constituent assembly election.

The opposition believes that this is an attempt by the Chavistas to undermine the national assembly (parliament), where 60% of the deputies oppose Maduro’s government.
Maduro was elected president by a slim margin following Hugo Chavez’s death in 2013.

Maduro’s government says that an analogous process took place in 1999, when a similar body, elected by the people, drew up a new constitution, which was subsequently put to a referendum and adopted overwhelmingly by the Venezuelan electorate.

The assembly is probably best described as a cross between our own Citizens’ Assembly and the senate.

Some fear that regional elections, which are due to be held at the end of this year, and presidential elections, due in 2018, will not now take place, and that this constituent assembly will impose a new constitution without recourse to endorsement by the people, via a referendum.

This is a question I put to Samuel Moncado, the foreign minister and former Venezuelan ambassador to Ireland.

It is something he refutes, assuring the audience of international observers that the register for candidates in the regional election will be opened in August and that the recommendations for a new constitution, which are due to emerge from the constituent assembly, will be put to a referendum of the people.

Significant elements in a far from unified opposition have been seeking a new constitution and talks continued, up until recent days, to encourage them to participate in the constituent assembly election.

The decision to hold this constituent assembly election was, on the face of it, not the most astute move by a government under huge economic and political pressure, but clearly Maduro felt a need to do something.

Speaking with local Chavistas, they are acutely aware of the current crisis and the need to step back from an escalation of further violence.

This constituent assembly was seen as a way of bringing the many diverse interests in Venezuela together in a less heated atmosphere.

On seeing the Tricolour on my credentials, Maria Garcia, a Maduro supporter, says emphatically: “We don’t want a replication of the violence that happened in your country taking place here.”

The other principal reason why the Chavistas want to draw up a new constitution is to give constitutional status to the social missions that they have embarked upon over the last two decades.

These missions have been the most successful part of the Bolivarian revolution; more than 1.5m social-housing units were built, literacy increased hugely, and poorer people gained access to health care for the first time.

The election of Donald Trump as US president has shifted the balance of power in some regional conflicts and, just as his unavowed support for Saudi Arabia has isolated Qatar, so, too, has his election emboldened the opposition in Venezuela.

In concluding his meeting with the international monitors, Samuel Moncado described the relentless distortion of reality in Venezuela as ‘gas-lighting’ on a grand scale.

This is something that resonated with me and with most of the international delegation, as the Venezuela I have visited, on a number of occasions over the last 15 years, and have experienced first-hand, is a very different place to the one I have read about in the international press.

I regularly doubt what I have seen with my own eyes.

I witnessed long queues outside polling booths on Sunday, as mostly poorer sections of the city turned out to vote in large numbers; other polling stations were quiet.

There were some violent clashes again in the east of Caracas, and Merida state, some 650km south-west of Caracas.

An explosion in Altamira, on Sunday evening, injured a number of police officers, who were part of a motor cycle troop.

The death toll has not yet been confirmed by authorities.

The final turnout was 41%. Just over 8m people voted. Venezuela undoubtedly needs to create a space for resolving deep-seated conflict through peaceful means.

Outside interference of the sort that has taken place of late will hinder, rather than help, this process.

Adrian Kane works in Cork for Siptu and is a national organiser representing workers in the energy sector. He is chair of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions Energy and Natural Resources Committee.


.
[Edited 8/6/17 5:05am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #50 posted 08/06/17 6:05am

NorthC

"A Maduro supporter"..."speaking to Chavistas"... Another very one sided piece. That's my problem here: you only want to see your own side of the story.
[Edited 8/6/17 6:15am]
[Edited 8/6/17 6:17am]
[Edited 8/6/17 6:24am]
Don't ever lose your dreams.
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Reply #51 posted 08/07/17 12:34am

hausofmoi7

avatar

Venezuela is been set up as the next Iraq.
People on the left and right are trying to help make that happen.
Don't let it happen, again.


"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #52 posted 08/07/17 1:49am

hausofmoi7

avatar

The video below is an interview with Venezuela's economy minister.
It's highly informative and will give you a greater understanding of the situation in Venezuela.
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #53 posted 08/08/17 1:06am

hausofmoi7

avatar

"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #54 posted 08/09/17 7:10pm

214

Why is so difficult to know the truth.

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Reply #55 posted 08/13/17 7:17am

hausofmoi7

avatar

Trump has now threatened Venezuela with military action.
Not only has Venezuela never threatened the U.S.
The military strike would be because the U.S is supporting violent right wing racist protesters trying to overthrow the democratically elected government.


The World Reacts to Trump’s Military Threat Against Venezuela
Telesur.net
Politicians, social movements and governments have been issuing their responses.
In the 24 hours since U.S. President Donald Trump said Washington is exploring “many options regarding Venezuela, including a possible military option if necessary”, the global community has continued to condemn his comments.

In a teleSUR exclusive, the U.S. intellectual Noam Chomsky said the remarks were "shocking and dangerous".

Chomsky believes Trump maybe "painting himself into a corner. It is worth remembering that he is probably following his usual practice of speaking to his base, and trying to ensure that he remains in the limelight, not caring much about real world consequences (except to his pocketbook and image). The best hope is that some of the generals around him, who presumably understand the consequences, will manage to control him."

Regional powers have also come out strongly against the comments.

Ecuador says it "reminds the international community that the declaration of Latin America and the Caribbean as a zone of peace implies the commitment of all nations to preserve our common territory free of threats or military interventions of any kind. In this context, it expresses its solidarity with the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and rejects any threat of possible military intrusion into its territory. Ecuador reiterates the call for dialogue as the only way to solve the situation of the brother Venezuelan people.

The Peruvian government issued a statement saying it "rejects any threat or use of force not authorized by the United Nations Security Council."
Bolivia's President Evo Morales tweeted that Trump had blatantly revealed his interventionist plan adding, "We condemn US armed intervention against Venezuela, a country that seeks peace in a Constitutional dialogue and regional elections."

Morales also accused the right in Venezuela and abroad of being "nosily silent" in their complicity on the issue.

The Colombian government said it rejects military options and the use of force against its neighbor and insists "It is necessary to respect the Charter of the United Nations and international law, and the sovereignty of Venezuela through peaceful solutions."

Trump's threats were renounced by Mexico, echoing Bogota's assertion that a solution would not be found through "internal or external military actions."

Brazilian Foreign Minister Aloysio Nunes announced that his nation does not support military intervention in Venezuela.

"The time for the big stick has passed," he said. "Our path is that of diplomacy, politics and negotiation."

The Southern Common Market, Mercosur, also issued a statement alluding to Trump's threat.

"Mercosur considers that the only acceptable instruments for the promotion of democracy are dialouge and diplomacy," the statement said.

"The repudiation of violence and any option involving the use of force is unavoidable and constitutes the fundamental basis of democratic coexistence, both internally and in international relations."

And many other have been making their views clear:
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #56 posted 08/13/17 8:51am

NorthC

Trump may achieve the exact opposite of what he wants here. Venezuela was getting more and more isolated, but no matter how bad the Maduro regime is, an American intervention would be even worse. That's something we all agree on. Although I don't think it will get that far. Trump talks a lot of bs.
Don't ever lose your dreams.
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