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Thread started 05/20/17 8:00am

OldFriends4Sal
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When Your Child Is a Psychopath

This article makes me think of Michael Meyers(Halloween) the original-2 parent middle class suburban Michael and why it is more believable than the John Zombie 'poor white trash' version of Michael.

This has got to be a very life shocking numbing thing for any parent to see things... that they know are not right on all levels and not know how to proceed.

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This is a good day, Samantha tells me: 10 on a scale of 10. We’re sitting in a conference room at the San Marcos Treatment Center, just south of Austin, Texas, a space that has witnessed countless difficult conversations between troubled children, their worried parents, and clinical therapists. But today promises unalloyed joy. Samantha’s mother is visiting from Idaho, as she does every six weeks, which means lunch off campus and an excursion to Target. The girl needs supplies: new jeans, yoga pants, nail polish.

At 11, Samantha is just over 5 feet tall and has wavy black hair and a steady gaze. She flashes a smile when I ask about her favorite subject (history), and grimaces when I ask about her least favorite (math). She seems poised and cheerful, a normal preteen. But when we steer into uncomfortable territory—the events that led her to this juvenile-treatment facility nearly 2,000 miles from her family—Samantha hesitates and looks down at her hands. “I wanted the whole world to myself,” she says. “So I made a whole entire book about how to hurt people.”

Starting at age 6, Samantha began drawing pictures of murder weapons: a knife, a bow and arrow, chemicals for poisoning, a plastic bag for suffocating. She tells me that she pretended to kill her stuffed animals.

“You were practicing on your stuffed animals?,” I ask her.

She nods.

“How did you feel when you were doing that to your stuffed animals?”

“Happy.”

“Why did it make you feel happy?”

“Because I thought that someday I was going to end up doing it on somebody.”

“Did you ever try?”

Silence.

“I choked my little brother.”

Samantha’s parents, Jen and Danny, adopted Samantha when she was 2. They already had three biological children, but they felt called to add Samantha (not her real name) and her half sister, who is two years older, to their family. They later had two more kids.

From the start, Samantha seemed a willful child, in tyrannical need of attention. But what toddler isn’t? Her biological mother had been forced to give her up because she’d lost her job and home and couldn’t provide for her four children, but there was no evidence of abuse. According to documentation from the state of Texas, Samantha met all her cognitive, emotional, and physical milestones. She had no learning disabilities, no emotional scars, no signs of ADHD or autism.

But even at a very young age, Samantha had a mean streak.

When she was about 20 months old, living with foster parents in Texas, she clashed with a boy in day care. The caretaker soothed them both; problem solved. Later that day Samantha, who was already potty trained, walked over to where the boy was playing, pulled down her pants, and peed on him. “She knew exactly what she was doing,” Jen says. “There was an ability to wait until an opportune moment to exact her revenge on someone.”

When Samantha got a little older, she would pinch, trip, or push her siblings and smile if they cried. She would break into her sister’s piggy bank and rip up all the bills. Once, when Samantha was 5, Jen scolded her for being mean to one of her siblings. Samantha walked upstairs to her parents’ bathroom and washed her mother’s contact lenses down the drain. “Her behavior wasn’t impulsive,” Jen says. “It was very thoughtful, premeditated.”

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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Reply #1 posted 05/20/17 8:03am

OldFriends4Sal
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One bitter December day in 2011, Jen was driving the children along a winding road near their home. Samantha had just turned 6. Suddenly Jen heard screaming from the back seat, and when she looked in the mirror, she saw Samantha with her hands around the throat of her 2-year-old sister, who was trapped in her car seat. Jen separated them, and once they were home, she pulled Samantha aside.

“What were you doing?,” Jen asked.

“I was trying to choke her,” Samantha said.

“You realize that would have killed her? She would not have been able to breathe. She would have died.”

“I know.”

“What about the rest of us?”

“I want to kill all of you.”

Samantha later showed Jen her sketches, and Jen watched in horror as her daughter demonstrated how to strangle or suffocate her stuffed animals. “I was so terrified,” Jen says. “I felt like I had lost control.”

Four months later, Samantha tried to strangle her baby brother, who was just two months old.

Jen and Danny had to admit that nothing seemed to make a difference—not affection, not discipline, not therapy. “I was reading and reading and reading, trying to figure out what diagnosis made sense,” Jen tells me. “What fits with the behaviors I’m seeing?” Eventually she found one condition that did seem to fit—but it was a diagnosis that all the mental-health professionals had dismissed, because it’s considered both rare and untreatable. In July 2013, Jen took Samantha to see a psychiatrist in New York City, who confirmed her suspicion.

“In the children’s mental-health world, it’s pretty much a terminal diagnosis, except your child’s not going to die,” Jen says. “It’s just that there’s no help.” She recalls walking out of the psychiatrist’s office on that warm afternoon and standing on a street corner in Manhattan as pedestrians pushed past her in a blur. A feeling flooded over her, singular, unexpected. Hope. Someone had finally acknowledged her family’s plight. Perhaps she and Danny could, against the odds, find a way to help their daughter.

Samantha was diagnosed with conduct disorder with callous and unemotional traits. She had all the characteristics of a budding psychopath.

One bitter December day in 2011, Jen was driving the children along a winding road near their home. Samantha had just turned 6. Suddenly Jen heard screaming from the back seat, and when she looked in the mirror, she saw Samantha with her hands around the throat of her 2-year-old sister, who was trapped in her car seat. Jen separated them, and once they were home, she pulled Samantha aside.

“What were you doing?,” Jen asked.

“I was trying to choke her,” Samantha said.

“You realize that would have killed her? She would not have been able to breathe. She would have died.”

“I know.”

“What about the rest of us?”

“I want to kill all of you.”

Samantha later showed Jen her sketches, and Jen watched in horror as her daughter demonstrated how to strangle or suffocate her stuffed animals. “I was so terrified,” Jen says. “I felt like I had lost control.”

Four months later, Samantha tried to strangle her baby brother, who was just two months old.

Jen and Danny had to admit that nothing seemed to make a difference—not affection, not discipline, not therapy. “I was reading and reading and reading, trying to figure out what diagnosis made sense,” Jen tells me. “What fits with the behaviors I’m seeing?” Eventually she found one condition that did seem to fit—but it was a diagnosis that all the mental-health professionals had dismissed, because it’s considered both rare and untreatable. In July 2013, Jen took Samantha to see a psychiatrist in New York City, who confirmed her suspicion.

“In the children’s mental-health world, it’s pretty much a terminal diagnosis, except your child’s not going to die,” Jen says. “It’s just that there’s no help.” She recalls walking out of the psychiatrist’s office on that warm afternoon and standing on a street corner in Manhattan as pedestrians pushed past her in a blur. A feeling flooded over her, singular, unexpected. Hope. Someone had finally acknowledged her family’s plight. Perhaps she and Danny could, against the odds, find a way to help their daughter.

Samantha was diagnosed with conduct disorder with callous and unemotional traits. She had all the characteristics of a budding psychopath.

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #2 posted 05/20/17 10:13am

Pokeno4Money

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This is both fascinating and chilling stuff, thanks for posting OF4S.

After the first attempt to choke a sibling, I can't believe she was allowed to attempt it again on another sibling.

After the first incident, I'd been like "See ya, I'm out".

"As a team, we have chosen to stand and interlock arms in unity. We honor those who have fought for the freedom we cherish. And we stand to ensure the riches and freedom and the security of justice for all people." --- Doug Baldwin
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Reply #3 posted 05/20/17 11:04am

2freaky4church
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One sign is dead eyes. SNIP -

DJ is da man
"2freaky is very down." 2Elijah.
"2freaky convinced me to join Antifa: OnlyNDA
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Reply #4 posted 05/20/17 11:40am

Pokeno4Money

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2freaky4church1 said:

One sign is dead eyes. SNIP-


Trying to hijack a mod's thread?

My, somebody thinks they are Teflon Don. no no no!

"As a team, we have chosen to stand and interlock arms in unity. We honor those who have fought for the freedom we cherish. And we stand to ensure the riches and freedom and the security of justice for all people." --- Doug Baldwin
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Reply #5 posted 05/20/17 2:10pm

DiminutiveRock
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OF4S - did you happen to catch the HBO dcumentary about the two little girls who stabbed their friend and left her for dead because an imaginary "boogie man" told them they had to:

Beware the Slenderman








Turns out one of the girl's father was a diagnosed schizophrenic and it is thought that his daughter may be suffering from this also - mental fragmentation, not being able to differentiate the real from the halucination.

So sad. To hear the parents talk about their daughter(s) in the movie is heartbreaking.

The friend they stabbed survived, but the little girls face attempted murder charges.

"When you have people who don't know about science standing in denial of it and rising to power - that is a recipe for the complete dismantling of our informed democracy" - Neil de Grasse Tyson
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Reply #6 posted 05/20/17 3:01pm

djThunderfunk

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2freaky4church1 said:

One sign is dead eyes. SNIP -


You're off your meds or somethin', seek professional help.

We were HERE, where were you?

4 those that knew the number and didn't call... fk all y'all!
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Reply #7 posted 05/20/17 3:42pm

morningsong

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Quite a few years ago I started reading about the differences between sociopaths and psychopaths. There doesn't seem to be a clear cut definition because it's so hard to understand. The genetics involved. The whole nurture vs nature involved. From what I understand nurturing has a dramatic effect on those that are genetically predispose to be sociopaths, where in psychopaths the genetic deposition is the predominent factor on who they are regardless of their environment. It's unnerving knowing there is no magic pill that'll fix it. It trial and error.
“Do I dare Disturb the universe?”
― T.S. Eliot

“Only by acceptance of the past, can you alter it”
― T.S. Eliot
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Reply #8 posted 05/20/17 4:28pm

OldFriends4Sal
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No I did not see this. Thanks for posting. That kind of stuff is just so disturbing.

I remember a story back in the 90s of a 9/10 yr old kid who became jealous of his friend spending time with his father when he spent the week with his family and having been taught how to shoot a riffle at an early age, shot his friend when he father took the boy horse riding.

Will have to look up what happened to those girls.

DiminutiveRocker said:

OF4S - did you happen to catch the HBO dcumentary about the two little girls who stabbed their friend and left her for dead because an imaginary "boogie man" told them they had to:

Beware the Slenderman








Turns out one of the girl's father was a diagnosed schizophrenic and it is thought that his daughter may be suffering from this also - mental fragmentation, not being able to differentiate the real from the halucination.

So sad. To hear the parents talk about their daughter(s) in the movie is heartbreaking.

The friend they stabbed survived, but the little girls face attempted murder charges.

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #9 posted 05/20/17 4:31pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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Pokeno4Money said:

This is both fascinating and chilling stuff, thanks for posting OF4S.

After the first attempt to choke a sibling, I can't believe she was allowed to attempt it again on another sibling.

After the first incident, I'd been like "See ya, I'm out".

Yes it is.

the line, is it thick or very thin between us being broken or whole

Yeah first time, those two would have never been in the same space.

Keep animals away from her too. This makes me wonder about female serial killers. This kind of stuff is usually what they look for in men.

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #10 posted 05/20/17 4:42pm

OldFriends4Sal
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I remember an episode of the Walking Dead dealt with this.
The camp at the Prison had 2 sister and one did not know who

to seperate the reality of the walkers being dead/no longer 'human'

she ended up killer her sister, and was going to kill the baby to prove to

the adults they were no different

So Carol felt they had to kill her because she could not be around other humans

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #11 posted 05/20/17 4:46pm

DiminutiveRock
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OldFriends4Sale said:

I remember an episode of the Walking Dead dealt with this.
The camp at the Prison had 2 sister and one did not know who

to seperate the reality of the walkers being dead/no longer 'human'

she ended up killer her sister, and was going to kill the baby to prove to

the adults they were no different

So Carol felt they had to kill her because she could not be around other humans

I remember that episode - it was really intense. As if the show isn't already !

"When you have people who don't know about science standing in denial of it and rising to power - that is a recipe for the complete dismantling of our informed democracy" - Neil de Grasse Tyson
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #12 posted 05/20/17 4:54pm

Pokeno4Money

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OldFriends4Sale said:

Pokeno4Money said:

This is both fascinating and chilling stuff, thanks for posting OF4S.

After the first attempt to choke a sibling, I can't believe she was allowed to attempt it again on another sibling.

After the first incident, I'd been like "See ya, I'm out".

Yes it is.

the line, is it thick or very thin between us being broken or whole

Yeah first time, those two would have never been in the same space.

Keep animals away from her too. This makes me wonder about female serial killers. This kind of stuff is usually what they look for in men.


To me the scariest sign is lack of emotion. Death means nothing to them. No reaction at all, just pleasure they feel.

"As a team, we have chosen to stand and interlock arms in unity. We honor those who have fought for the freedom we cherish. And we stand to ensure the riches and freedom and the security of justice for all people." --- Doug Baldwin
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
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