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Thread started 05/13/17 7:24am

SuperFurryAnim
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African Americans don't sleep as well as whites?

According to this author. African Americans do not sleep as well as whites. Do you believe slavery effects sleep today?

--

African Americans don't sleep as well as whites, an inequality stretching back to slavery

When we study racial inequality, we tend to consider factors that affect people while they are awake. Differential access to safe neighborhoods with good schools, decent jobs and unbalanced treatment by police and the courts surely have much to do with the stubborn disparities in wealth and well-being among blacks and whites, in particular. Yet it may be just as important to consider what happens when we’re asleep. Race shapes our sleep, a relationship that has surprising roots deep in our national past.

African Americans suffer from a “sleep gap”: Fewer black people are able to sleep for the recommended six to nine nightly hours than any other ethnic group in the United States; compounding matters, a smaller percentage of African Americans’ slumber is spent in “slow-wave sleep,” the deepest and most restorative phase of sleep that produces the most benefits in healing and cognition. Poor sleep has cascading effects on racial health disparities, including increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

The racial sleep gap is largely a matter of unequal access to safe, reliable and comfortable sleep environments, and this sleeping inequality has a long history. For centuries, whites have tacitly accepted — and even actively created — such inequality. Aboard the ships of the transatlantic slave trade, African captives were made to sleep en masse in the hold, often while chained together. Once in the New World, enslaved people were usually still made to sleep in tight quarters, sometimes on the bare floor, and they struggled to snatch any sleep at all while chained together in the coffle. Slaveholders systematically disallowed privacy as they attempted round-the-clock surveillance, and enslaved women were especially susceptible at night to sexual assault from white men.

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-reiss-race-sleep-gap-20170423-story.html

"Ya see, me and the Lord have an understanding."
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Reply #1 posted 05/13/17 8:11am

Pokeno4Money

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Those who stay up late watching Colbert are of course depriving themselves of sleep.

"As a team, we have chosen to stand and interlock arms in unity. We honor those who have fought for the freedom we cherish. And we stand to ensure the riches and freedom and the security of justice for all people." --- Doug Baldwin
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Reply #2 posted 05/13/17 8:33am

NorthC

I'm white and I always envied my African wife because she could fall asleep so easily why I was still lying awake...
Don't ever lose your dreams.
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Reply #3 posted 05/13/17 8:34am

2freaky4church
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Your African wife? Explain. lol Adore African honies.

"2freaky is a complete stud." DJ
"2freaky is very down." 2Elijah.
"2freaky convinced me to join Antifa: OnlyNDA
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Reply #4 posted 05/13/17 8:37am

2elijah

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Total bs. Whose ass you pulled that story out of. The same as that racist cartoon you posted?

I can only see that applying to anyone who experienced being in a captive/abducted or many veterans who were involved in wars, etc, because of the trauma they experienced, but to isolate it to one race/ethnic is ridiculous.

And no superfurry, no such white supreme race ever existed, so you failed at using that article to push your ignorant agenda. Get over it.
[Edited 5/13/17 8:52am]
'Trump voters got Hoodwinked by Trump' popcorn coke
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Reply #5 posted 05/13/17 8:39am

Pokeno4Money

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NorthC said:

I'm white and I always envied my African wife because she could fall asleep so easily why I was still lying awake...


Same here, but that's because I'm always wanting something ... lol

"As a team, we have chosen to stand and interlock arms in unity. We honor those who have fought for the freedom we cherish. And we stand to ensure the riches and freedom and the security of justice for all people." --- Doug Baldwin
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Reply #6 posted 05/13/17 8:39am

NorthC

Not much to explain. I've been married to a Kenyan. Getting back to sleep issues, the modern lifestyle of always being online and staring at a computer/phone screen until late is also causing a lot of sleep problems, no matter what race or ethnic group you're from.
Don't ever lose your dreams.
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Reply #7 posted 05/13/17 8:50am

2elijah

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NorthC said:

Not much to explain. I've been married to a Kenyan. Getting back to sleep issues, the modern lifestyle of always being online and staring at a computer/phone screen until late is also causing a lot of sleep problems, no matter what race or ethnic group you're from.

Exactly.
[Edited 5/13/17 9:58am]
'Trump voters got Hoodwinked by Trump' popcorn coke
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Reply #8 posted 05/13/17 8:57am

SuperFurryAnim
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2elijah said:

Total bs. Whose ass you pulled that story out of. The same as that racist cartoon you posted? I can only see that applying to anyone who experienced being in a captive/abducted or many veterans who were involved in wars, etc, because of the trauma they experienced, but to isolate it to one race/ethnic is ridiculous. And no superfurry, no such white supreme race ever existed, so you failed at using that article to push your ignorant agenda. Get over it. [Edited 5/13/17 8:52am]

Los Angeles Times

www.latimes.com

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Reply #9 posted 05/13/17 9:03am

SuperFurryAnim
al

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2elijah said:

NorthC said:
Not much to explain. I've been married to a Kenyan. Getting back to sleep issues, the modern lifestyle of always being online and staring at a computer/phone screen until late is also causing a lot of sleep problems, no matter what race or ethnic group you're from.
Exactly.

I thought the article was insane. Another liberal whospaper writing insanity.

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Reply #10 posted 05/13/17 9:49am

Pokeno4Money

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NorthC said:

Getting back to sleep issues, the modern lifestyle of always being online and staring at a computer/phone screen until late is also causing a lot of sleep problems, no matter what race or ethnic group you're from.


That right there is probably the only thing posted in this thread that has any value.

It's very true, and important for people to know. The screens on computers/phones DO impact people's ability to sleep, which is why it's recommended that people refrain from using them at least two hours before planned bedtime.

Thanks for posting, North.

"As a team, we have chosen to stand and interlock arms in unity. We honor those who have fought for the freedom we cherish. And we stand to ensure the riches and freedom and the security of justice for all people." --- Doug Baldwin
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Reply #11 posted 05/13/17 11:06am

deebee

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Well, it's plausible, and there may well be statistical evidence to back it up. But this sort of story suffers from the same potential problem as all studies or polls that cluster people according to ethnic group: which is that we're encouraged to think we've found something causally significant, when, in actuality, we may have merely identified a statistical correlation.


You can certainly do a sociology of sleep, though. If you think about the factors that causally affect how much sleep you get, various social factors come into play, such as work (the kind of work you do, the length of the hours you work, how far away your job is from where you live, whether you have more than one job, etc), but also things like family commitments (do you have kids to get up in the night for, or to get ready for school? do you have a nanny to help with that? etc). So, one can imagine that, for example, social class will have some causal significance in determining the number of hours a person gets to spend tucked up at night (likely mediated by social factors like gender, age, area of residence, etc). And it's therefore plausible that if you isolate statistically a demographic category that is clustered at the working class end of the socioeconomic spectrum, and compare it with another demographic category that is also largely working class, but has a bigger middle class and bigger minority of very wealthy people, you'll find a correlation.

The problem is, articles, studies, opinion polls, etc, that tell us about racial disparities encourage us to attribute the cause of the disparity to some characteristic of the demographic group. So, here, we might start thinking about health issues with their origins in biology, or culture, or indeed some legacy of racial history or a facet of the racial present, as directed by the article - and perhaps these do play some part in the whole complex sociological story - but it might also throw us off the scent in certain ways. And maybe that's all pretty small beer when we're trying to correctly identify the causes of sleep duration, but what about when we're looking at statistics on crime, or indeed wealth? Misidentified causes may have more serious consequences.

"Not everything that is faced can be changed; but nothing can be changed until it is faced." - James Baldwin
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Reply #12 posted 05/13/17 11:19am

2freaky4church
1

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They may tend to dream about cross burnings and shit. lol

"2freaky is a complete stud." DJ
"2freaky is very down." 2Elijah.
"2freaky convinced me to join Antifa: OnlyNDA
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Reply #13 posted 05/13/17 4:26pm

Pokeno4Money

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2freaky4church1 said:

They may tend to dream about cross burnings and shit. lol


Who?

Not white people, they dream about running out of mayonnaise.

"As a team, we have chosen to stand and interlock arms in unity. We honor those who have fought for the freedom we cherish. And we stand to ensure the riches and freedom and the security of justice for all people." --- Doug Baldwin
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Reply #14 posted 05/13/17 10:49pm

jjhunsecker

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deebee said:

Well, it's plausible, and there may well be statistical evidence to back it up. But this sort of story suffers from the same potential problem as all studies or polls that cluster people according to ethnic group: which is that we're encouraged to think we've found something causally significant, when, in actuality, we may have merely identified a statistical correlation.


You can certainly do a sociology of sleep, though. If you think about the factors that causally affect how much sleep you get, various social factors come into play, such as work (the kind of work you do, the length of the hours you work, how far away your job is from where you live, whether you have more than one job, etc), but also things like family commitments (do you have kids to get up in the night for, or to get ready for school? do you have a nanny to help with that? etc). So, one can imagine that, for example, social class will have some causal significance in determining the number of hours a person gets to spend tucked up at night (likely mediated by social factors like gender, age, area of residence, etc). And it's therefore plausible that if you isolate statistically a demographic category that is clustered at the working class end of the socioeconomic spectrum, and compare it with another demographic category that is also largely working class, but has a bigger middle class and bigger minority of very wealthy people, you'll find a correlation.

The problem is, articles, studies, opinion polls, etc, that tell us about racial disparities encourage us to attribute the cause of the disparity to some characteristic of the demographic group. So, here, we might start thinking about health issues with their origins in biology, or culture, or indeed some legacy of racial history or a facet of the racial present, as directed by the article - and perhaps these do play some part in the whole complex sociological story - but it might also throw us off the scent in certain ways. And maybe that's all pretty small beer when we're trying to correctly identify the causes of sleep duration, but what about when we're looking at statistics on crime, or indeed wealth? Misidentified causes may have more serious consequences.

Once again, you are the voice of reason, and show up some of these other posters as the mumbling, grumbling simpletons that they are. Thanks again for taking your time to present your opinion.

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Reply #15 posted 05/14/17 6:40am

SuperFurryAnim
al

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jjhunsecker said:



deebee said:


Well, it's plausible, and there may well be statistical evidence to back it up. But this sort of story suffers from the same potential problem as all studies or polls that cluster people according to ethnic group: which is that we're encouraged to think we've found something causally significant, when, in actuality, we may have merely identified a statistical correlation.



You can certainly do a sociology of sleep, though. If you think about the factors that causally affect how much sleep you get, various social factors come into play, such as work (the kind of work you do, the length of the hours you work, how far away your job is from where you live, whether you have more than one job, etc), but also things like family commitments (do you have kids to get up in the night for, or to get ready for school? do you have a nanny to help with that? etc). So, one can imagine that, for example, social class will have some causal significance in determining the number of hours a person gets to spend tucked up at night (likely mediated by social factors like gender, age, area of residence, etc). And it's therefore plausible that if you isolate statistically a demographic category that is clustered at the working class end of the socioeconomic spectrum, and compare it with another demographic category that is also largely working class, but has a bigger middle class and bigger minority of very wealthy people, you'll find a correlation.

The problem is, articles, studies, opinion polls, etc, that tell us about racial disparities encourage us to attribute the cause of the disparity to some characteristic of the demographic group. So, here, we might start thinking about health issues with their origins in biology, or culture, or indeed some legacy of racial history or a facet of the racial present, as directed by the article - and perhaps these do play some part in the whole complex sociological story - but it might also throw us off the scent in certain ways. And maybe that's all pretty small beer when we're trying to correctly identify the causes of sleep duration, but what about when we're looking at statistics on crime, or indeed wealth? Misidentified causes may have more serious consequences.




Once again, you are the voice of reason, and show up some of these other posters as the mumbling, grumbling simpletons that they are. Thanks again for taking your time to present your opinion.



This is some ramblings. The article was in a huge liberal newspaper. This is more conditioning. Forget about is the article is factual.
"Ya see, me and the Lord have an understanding."
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Reply #16 posted 05/15/17 3:10am

deebee

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jjhunsecker said:

deebee said:

Well, it's plausible, and there may well be statistical evidence to back it up. But this sort of story suffers from the same potential problem as all studies or polls that cluster people according to ethnic group: which is that we're encouraged to think we've found something causally significant, when, in actuality, we may have merely identified a statistical correlation.


You can certainly do a sociology of sleep, though. If you think about the factors that causally affect how much sleep you get, various social factors come into play, such as work (the kind of work you do, the length of the hours you work, how far away your job is from where you live, whether you have more than one job, etc), but also things like family commitments (do you have kids to get up in the night for, or to get ready for school? do you have a nanny to help with that? etc). So, one can imagine that, for example, social class will have some causal significance in determining the number of hours a person gets to spend tucked up at night (likely mediated by social factors like gender, age, area of residence, etc). And it's therefore plausible that if you isolate statistically a demographic category that is clustered at the working class end of the socioeconomic spectrum, and compare it with another demographic category that is also largely working class, but has a bigger middle class and bigger minority of very wealthy people, you'll find a correlation.

The problem is, articles, studies, opinion polls, etc, that tell us about racial disparities encourage us to attribute the cause of the disparity to some characteristic of the demographic group. So, here, we might start thinking about health issues with their origins in biology, or culture, or indeed some legacy of racial history or a facet of the racial present, as directed by the article - and perhaps these do play some part in the whole complex sociological story - but it might also throw us off the scent in certain ways. And maybe that's all pretty small beer when we're trying to correctly identify the causes of sleep duration, but what about when we're looking at statistics on crime, or indeed wealth? Misidentified causes may have more serious consequences.

Once again, you are the voice of reason, and show up some of these other posters as the mumbling, grumbling simpletons that they are. Thanks again for taking your time to present your opinion.

Cheers, JJ. I did try to condense my point into a three syllable chant to appeal to those who prefer to digest opinion in that form ("Build. a. wall!", "Lock. her. up!", etc), but I could only come up with "Cause. not. clear!" and "Probe. those. links!", which seemed disappointing. confused

"Not everything that is faced can be changed; but nothing can be changed until it is faced." - James Baldwin
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Reply #17 posted 05/15/17 4:52am

Pokeno4Money

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deebee said:

I did try to condense my point into a three syllable chant to appeal to those who prefer to digest opinion in that form


Yeah, those who do nothing more than chant "Impeach Donald Trump" or "That is racist" or "Stop global warming" probably appreciate your efforts.

"As a team, we have chosen to stand and interlock arms in unity. We honor those who have fought for the freedom we cherish. And we stand to ensure the riches and freedom and the security of justice for all people." --- Doug Baldwin
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Reply #18 posted 05/15/17 10:32am

2freaky4church
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SNIP

"2freaky is a complete stud." DJ
"2freaky is very down." 2Elijah.
"2freaky convinced me to join Antifa: OnlyNDA
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Reply #19 posted 05/17/17 4:15am

Dasein

Of course ninjas don't sleep as well as whites . . . we gotta stay woke.

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Reply #20 posted 05/17/17 11:28am

tmo1965

SuperFurryAnimal said:

According to this author. African Americans do not sleep as well as whites. Do you believe slavery effects sleep today?

--

African Americans don't sleep as well as whites, an inequality stretching back to slavery

When we study racial inequality, we tend to consider factors that affect people while they are awake. Differential access to safe neighborhoods with good schools, decent jobs and unbalanced treatment by police and the courts surely have much to do with the stubborn disparities in wealth and well-being among blacks and whites, in particular. Yet it may be just as important to consider what happens when we’re asleep. Race shapes our sleep, a relationship that has surprising roots deep in our national past.

African Americans suffer from a “sleep gap”: Fewer black people are able to sleep for the recommended six to nine nightly hours than any other ethnic group in the United States; compounding matters, a smaller percentage of African Americans’ slumber is spent in “slow-wave sleep,” the deepest and most restorative phase of sleep that produces the most benefits in healing and cognition. Poor sleep has cascading effects on racial health disparities, including increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

The racial sleep gap is largely a matter of unequal access to safe, reliable and comfortable sleep environments, and this sleeping inequality has a long history. For centuries, whites have tacitly accepted — and even actively created — such inequality. Aboard the ships of the transatlantic slave trade, African captives were made to sleep en masse in the hold, often while chained together. Once in the New World, enslaved people were usually still made to sleep in tight quarters, sometimes on the bare floor, and they struggled to snatch any sleep at all while chained together in the coffle. Slaveholders systematically disallowed privacy as they attempted round-the-clock surveillance, and enslaved women were especially susceptible at night to sexual assault from white men.

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-reiss-race-sleep-gap-20170423-story.html

Who comes up with this crap? All of my life I've heard these negative "statistics" about African American. I stopped listening to it a long time ago. I seriously wonder if this is part of a government operation to discredit and demoralize African Americans.

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Reply #21 posted 05/17/17 12:20pm

Pokeno4Money

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tmo1965 said:

Who comes up with this crap? All of my life I've heard these negative "statistics" about African American. I stopped listening to it a long time ago. I seriously wonder if this is part of a government operation to discredit and demoralize African Americans.


I agree the article is crap, but why you sayin' it's "negative"?

What's "negative" about not being able to get enough sleep?

Millions of people suffer from sleep disorders such as sleep apnea, it's through no fault of their own.

"As a team, we have chosen to stand and interlock arms in unity. We honor those who have fought for the freedom we cherish. And we stand to ensure the riches and freedom and the security of justice for all people." --- Doug Baldwin
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Reply #22 posted 05/17/17 1:44pm

SuperFurryAnim
al

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tmo1965 said:

Who comes up with this crap? All of my life I've heard these negative "statistics" about African American. I stopped listening to it a long time ago. I seriously wonder if this is part of a government operation to discredit and demoralize African Americans.

True these types of gov ops happen all the time.

"Ya see, me and the Lord have an understanding."
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Reply #23 posted 05/18/17 6:00am

tmo1965

Pokeno4Money said:

tmo1965 said:


I agree the article is crap, but why you sayin' it's "negative"?

What's "negative" about not being able to get enough sleep?

Millions of people suffer from sleep disorders such as sleep apnea, it's through no fault of their own.

Not being able to sleep in itself is not negative, but when you look at all of these so called statistics, they always portray black people as lacking in some way. In this instance, it's not getting enough sleep.

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Reply #24 posted 05/18/17 2:02pm

NorthC

Not being able to sleep IS negative. Trust me.
Don't ever lose your dreams.
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