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Forums > Politics & Religion > Red Sox fans taunt black player with N-words. Sick
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Reply #270 posted 05/14/17 6:30am

Pokeno4Money

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Dasein said:

Pokeno4Money said:


You're projecting.

Just because YOU can't separate your inner feelings from your ability to conduct yourself in a moral, ethical, professional manner ... it doesn't mean NOBODY ELSE can separate the two.

I think you've mentioned you're a college professor, is that correct?

Then tell me, honestly, do you like EVERY SINGLE ONE of your colleagues? Do you respect ALL of your superiors? Are you fond of ALL of your students?

If you're like most professors, the honest answer is NO, NO and NO.

But I assume you don't go around making your dislike of those people known, now do you? You don't call any of your disliked students "little shitheads" and give them worse grades than they deserve, now do you? You don't refer to any of your disliked colleagues as "capricious dolts" and throw them under the bus at every opportunity, now do you?

I find it very hard to believe that you don't possess enough INTEGRITY and CHARACTER to not allow your personal feelings to get in the way of doing the right thing.

But who knows, I could be wrong.

[Edited 5/11/17 18:07pm]


No, I'm not a college professor. But I'm not projecting; I'm not denying qualities I find repre-
hensible in myself and then attributing them onto others. Instead, throughout the course of my
career, I've noticed that actions and behaviors are often influenced by our thoughts, feelings,
etc., and what results from this interaction may not be obvious. So, I find it highly improbable that
a person who is filled with deep hatred for somebody could deny that enmity and still treat that
same somebody with respect.


Well even though you're not a professor/teacher, my examples still apply in any workplace environment. There is an expected level of decorum and professionalism that most people maintain despite their personal feelings. Most people can't choose all their coworkers, so they'll be working with people from very different backgrounds who have very different beliefs and personalities. There may be different reasons for them not discriminating - religious, moral, ethical, wanting to maintain a good reputation, fear of negative repercussions, common friends, etc - but the bottom line is any negative thoughts you have of others, it's wise to keep it to yourself.

"As a team, we have chosen to stand and interlock arms in unity. We honor those who have fought for the freedom we cherish. And we stand to ensure the riches and freedom and the security of justice for all people." --- Doug Baldwin
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Reply #271 posted 05/14/17 6:59am

Dasein

Pokeno4Money said:

Dasein said:


No, I'm not a college professor. But I'm not projecting; I'm not denying qualities I find repre-
hensible in myself and then attributing them onto others. Instead, throughout the course of my
career, I've noticed that actions and behaviors are often influenced by our thoughts, feelings,
etc., and what results from this interaction may not be obvious. So, I find it highly improbable that
a person who is filled with deep hatred for somebody could deny that enmity and still treat that
same somebody with respect.


Well even though you're not a professor/teacher, my examples still apply in any workplace environment. There is an expected level of decorum and professionalism that most people maintain despite their personal feelings. Most people can't choose all their coworkers, so they'll be working with people from very different backgrounds who have very different beliefs and personalities. There may be different reasons for them not discriminating - religious, moral, ethical, wanting to maintain a good reputation, fear of negative repercussions, common friends, etc - but the bottom line is any negative thoughts you have of others, it's wise to keep it to yourself.


. . . and how does this apply to white men in power working in the halls of US policy-making who
are racist and sexist and classist and xenophobic?

It is rare in the history of US policy-making where you find white men in power making a consistent
appeal to "decorum and professionalism" as it pertains to administering justice and in the face of
disliking and hating members of a discrete group. Actually, one could argue that the structures of
US policy-making allows for indecorum and unprofessionalism as it pertains to administering justice.
So, again, this romantic idea you have of white men in power who hate Black people; are sexist; and
xenophobic who are able to look past these personal misgivings and not marginalize and oppress
people who are not straight white men is just that: romance.

In creating this scenario, you're depicting a highly idealized self and making it seem like lawmakers
who hate and dislike Black people can actually treat them with respect; this is horseshit. And ironic-
ally, you're the one closer to improperly attributing what you think you possess onto others.

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Reply #272 posted 05/14/17 10:17pm

SeventeenDayze

Pokeno4Money said:

SeventeenDayze said:

The comments on this thread by the usual racist suspects on the Org is just further evidence that many folks only see blacks as entertainment and to be held in disdain if said blacks dare speak out against injustice or go outside of acceptable behaviors. Ridiculous. Coming to a site dedicated to a black performer to complain about black people who speak out against how we're treated. There's really nothing new under the sun.


Who here opposed Adam Jones speaking out about the racial slurs directed at him in Fenway? Nobody that I can see.

As for bringing up Prince's "blackness", that's totally uncalled for. The man hated labels, hated generalizations, hated stereotypes, and sung "I wish there was no black and white". Furthermore, he surrounded himself with many white bandmates and his fanbase is more white than black. So please, for the love of God, let the man rest in peace without you invoking his name to further your racebaiting agenda. Thank you.

You just outed yourself here as one of the "usual racist suspects" that I spoke of. Racist troll.

Trolls be gone!
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Reply #273 posted 05/15/17 5:10am

Pokeno4Money

avatar

Dasein said:

Pokeno4Money said:


Well even though you're not a professor/teacher, my examples still apply in any workplace environment. There is an expected level of decorum and professionalism that most people maintain despite their personal feelings. Most people can't choose all their coworkers, so they'll be working with people from very different backgrounds who have very different beliefs and personalities. There may be different reasons for them not discriminating - religious, moral, ethical, wanting to maintain a good reputation, fear of negative repercussions, common friends, etc - but the bottom line is any negative thoughts you have of others, it's wise to keep it to yourself.


. . . and how does this apply to white men in power working in the halls of US policy-making who
are racist and sexist and classist and xenophobic?

It is rare in the history of US policy-making where you find white men in power making a consistent
appeal to "decorum and professionalism" as it pertains to administering justice and in the face of
disliking and hating members of a discrete group. Actually, one could argue that the structures of
US policy-making allows for indecorum and unprofessionalism as it pertains to administering justice.
So, again, this romantic idea you have of white men in power who hate Black people; are sexist; and
xenophobic who are able to look past these personal misgivings and not marginalize and oppress
people who are not straight white men is just that: romance.

In creating this scenario, you're depicting a highly idealized self and making it seem like lawmakers
who hate and dislike Black people can actually treat them with respect; this is horseshit. And ironic-
ally, you're the one closer to improperly attributing what you think you possess onto others.


Getting back to the original topic, it's ludicrous to believe large groups of people are closet racists who are constantly thinking the "n" word even though they don't verbalize their thoughts. And my position stands: if I'm out in public and complete strangers are thinking of insulting things about me, I couldn't care less. As long as they don't cross the line by verbalizing their thoughts or disrespecting me in any way, it's all good.

"As a team, we have chosen to stand and interlock arms in unity. We honor those who have fought for the freedom we cherish. And we stand to ensure the riches and freedom and the security of justice for all people." --- Doug Baldwin
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Reply #274 posted 05/15/17 10:11am

Dasein

Pokeno4Money said:


Getting back to the original topic, it's ludicrous to believe large groups of people are closet racists who are constantly thinking the "n" word even though they don't verbalize their thoughts. And my position stands: if I'm out in public and complete strangers are thinking of insulting things about me, I couldn't care less. As long as they don't cross the line by verbalizing their thoughts or disrespecting me in any way, it's all good.


It's silly to think closeted racists are reluctant to verbalize their hatred? Is it silly to think that closeted
racists in power author policies that further marginalize and oppress minorities? I don't really care with
the level of comfortability you have towards those who are intolerable but not "crossing the line by
verbalizing their thoughts or disprespecting you in any way." But for you to think that people are able
to hold hatred in their hearts and minds without having that bleed into their behaviors in some manner
is just plain ol' dumb.

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Reply #275 posted 05/15/17 10:15am

Horsefeathers

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In the context of the OP and what has been defended, people did indeed verbalize those racist thoughts and express disrespect.
Murica: at least it's not Sudan.
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