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Thread started 09/16/13 7:44am

dJJ

Monsanto what do you know?

What do you know about Monsanto and how do you know it?

I'm interested because Monsanto has been actively trying to withold societies from important information. They censur individuals and groups who try to share information about how Monsanto is a threat to the health of all living organisms.


I have been rebelling against Monsanto on my fb account.

And a lot of links about Monsanto have been deleted from my account.

Everytime I change something at the Wikepedia page about Monsanto, it gets changed back to the Monsanto aproved tekst.


And they make sure nobody knows what they really do.


Therefore my question; What do you know about Monsanto?

Did they manage to keep you ignorant, or are you well informed?


99% of my posts are ironic. Maybe this post sides with the other 1%.
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Reply #1 posted 09/16/13 9:31am

Timmy84

I know Monsanto's dangerous. THAT I know. No surprise they would edit it back to where it was on Wikipedia after you edited. You got people who are gonna make sure the truth is hidden as they often do.

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Reply #2 posted 09/16/13 10:29am

morningsong

"Right now, NASA's annual budget is half a penny on your tax dollar. ...—a penny on a dollar—we can transform the country ... , to one where it has reclaimed its 20th century birthright to dream of tomorrow." Tyson
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Reply #3 posted 09/16/13 11:47am

Graycap23

Don't get me started on the tactics and MO of this company.

http://prince.org/msg/105/389179?pr

[Edited 9/16/13 11:49am]

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Reply #4 posted 09/16/13 1:50pm

dJJ

morningsong said:

Yeah, I know.


http://www.corpwatch.org/index.php



Thanks for that link.

99% of my posts are ironic. Maybe this post sides with the other 1%.
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Reply #5 posted 09/16/13 1:54pm

dJJ

Graycap23 said:

Don't get me started on the tactics and MO of this company.

http://prince.org/msg/105/389179?pr

[Edited 9/16/13 11:49am]



I don't understand why it's never in the media.

I follow March against Monsanto on facebook. And I watch documentaries about it.

But when I talk to people about it, they really have no idea.

They also don't belief me when I tell them how dangerous that company is.

They think that if I was right, the government would have done something about them.


Unfortunately Monsanto owns the governments and judges.

What I just don't understand is why people accept this for such a long time already.

99% of my posts are ironic. Maybe this post sides with the other 1%.
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Reply #6 posted 09/16/13 5:12pm

SuperFurryAnim
al

avatar

GMO all the food.
can't even buy a good peach
The Empire is on the run!
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Reply #7 posted 09/16/13 5:14pm

Timmy84

SuperFurryAnimal said:

GMO all the food. can't even buy a good peach

Yeah I heard there's GMO all over the fruits now.

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Reply #8 posted 09/17/13 11:05am

midnightmover

dJJ said:

Graycap23 said:

Don't get me started on the tactics and MO of this company.

http://prince.org/msg/105/389179?pr

[Edited 9/16/13 11:49am]



I don't understand why it's never in the media.

I follow March against Monsanto on facebook. And I watch documentaries about it.

But when I talk to people about it, they really have no idea.

They also don't belief me when I tell them how dangerous that company is.

They think that if I was right, the government would have done something about them.


Unfortunately Monsanto owns the governments and judges.

What I just don't understand is why people accept this for such a long time already.

People accept it because they don't know about it. It's that simple. Even if they hear about it from time to time, it doesn't actually register because they can't actually believe that such evil could be happening in plain sight. They trust the government to protect them and they trust the media to inform them.

Monsanto are a Mafia organization. They started off manufacturing chemical weapons for use in war then turned those weapons into pesticides for agriculture even though there was no demand for it. Arms were twisted and arms have been twisted ever since. It's because there are real world conspiracies out there like this that I have little patience for the fantasy conspiracies of the Alex Jones crowd. They divert our attention away from the real bad guys. And there are PLENTY of real bad guys in the corporate, financial and political sectors.

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Reply #9 posted 09/17/13 11:13am

Graycap23

midnightmover said:

dJJ said:



I don't understand why it's never in the media.

I follow March against Monsanto on facebook. And I watch documentaries about it.

But when I talk to people about it, they really have no idea.

They also don't belief me when I tell them how dangerous that company is.

They think that if I was right, the government would have done something about them.


Unfortunately Monsanto owns the governments and judges.

What I just don't understand is why people accept this for such a long time already.

People accept it because they don't know about it. It's that simple. Even if they hear about it from time to time, it doesn't actually register because they can't actually believe that such evil could be happening in plain sight. They trust the government to protect them and they trust the media to inform them.

Monsanto are a Mafia organization. They started off manufacturing chemical weapons for use in war then turned those weapons into pesticides for agriculture even though there was no demand for it. Arms were twisted and arms have been twisted ever since. It's because there are real world conspiracies out there like this that I have little patience for the fantasy conspiracies of the Alex Jones crowd. They divert our attention away from the real bad guys. And there are PLENTY of real bad guys in the corporate, financial and political sectors.

100% correct.

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Reply #10 posted 09/17/13 11:20am

dJJ

midnightmover said:

dJJ said:



I don't understand why it's never in the media.

I follow March against Monsanto on facebook. And I watch documentaries about it.

But when I talk to people about it, they really have no idea.

They also don't belief me when I tell them how dangerous that company is.

They think that if I was right, the government would have done something about them.


Unfortunately Monsanto owns the governments and judges.

What I just don't understand is why people accept this for such a long time already.

People accept it because they don't know about it. It's that simple. Even if they hear about it from time to time, it doesn't actually register because they can't actually believe that such evil could be happening in plain sight. They trust the government to protect them and they trust the media to inform them.

Monsanto are a Mafia organization. They started off manufacturing chemical weapons for use in war then turned those weapons into pesticides for agriculture even though there was no demand for it. Arms were twisted and arms have been twisted ever since. It's because there are real world conspiracies out there like this that I have little patience for the fantasy conspiracies of the Alex Jones crowd. They divert our attention away from the real bad guys. And there are PLENTY of real bad guys in the corporate, financial and political sectors.



I had to look up Alex Jones wink

What I find mindblowing about Monsanto poisening us, is that they can.

So many people sold their souls to this company.

And the once who didn't are intimidated, fired or ridiculed by Monsanto people.

My big question is WHY?

I don't understand how people would want to work for Monsanto or own their stocks.

Neither do I relate to people working in the weapon industry, cocaine/heroin industry or cigarette industry. How can you participate in something that you know is harming people, animals and earth?


99% of my posts are ironic. Maybe this post sides with the other 1%.
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Reply #11 posted 09/17/13 11:41am

midnightmover

dJJ said:

midnightmover said:

People accept it because they don't know about it. It's that simple. Even if they hear about it from time to time, it doesn't actually register because they can't actually believe that such evil could be happening in plain sight. They trust the government to protect them and they trust the media to inform them.

Monsanto are a Mafia organization. They started off manufacturing chemical weapons for use in war then turned those weapons into pesticides for agriculture even though there was no demand for it. Arms were twisted and arms have been twisted ever since. It's because there are real world conspiracies out there like this that I have little patience for the fantasy conspiracies of the Alex Jones crowd. They divert our attention away from the real bad guys. And there are PLENTY of real bad guys in the corporate, financial and political sectors.



I had to look up Alex Jones wink

What I find mindblowing about Monsanto poisening us, is that they can.

So many people sold their souls to this company.

And the once who didn't are intimidated, fired or ridiculed by Monsanto people.

My big question is WHY?

I don't understand how people would want to work for Monsanto or own their stocks.

Neither do I relate to people working in the weapon industry, cocaine/heroin industry or cigarette industry. How can you participate in something that you know is harming people, animals and earth?


You've heard the old saying that money is the root of all evil, right? Well, that's the beginning, the middle and the end of the story. We have allowed the pursuit of money to govern everything. It's the biggest failure of our age. And no-one really talks about it. They talk about the symptoms, but never the disease. In order to talk about that (the love of money) you'd probably have to put capitalism itself in the dock and NO-ONE wants to do that. Capitalism is sacrosanct. Even the so-called "radicals" of Occupy Wall Street are always careful never to criticize that sacred cow; only some particular forms of it.

[Edited 9/17/13 11:43am]

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Reply #12 posted 09/17/13 12:59pm

dJJ

midnightmover said:

dJJ said:



I had to look up Alex Jones wink

What I find mindblowing about Monsanto poisening us, is that they can.

So many people sold their souls to this company.

And the once who didn't are intimidated, fired or ridiculed by Monsanto people.

My big question is WHY?

I don't understand how people would want to work for Monsanto or own their stocks.

Neither do I relate to people working in the weapon industry, cocaine/heroin industry or cigarette industry. How can you participate in something that you know is harming people, animals and earth?


You've heard the old saying that money is the root of all evil, right? Well, that's the beginning, the middle and the end of the story. We have allowed the pursuit of money to govern everything. It's the biggest failure of our age. And no-one really talks about it. They talk about the symptoms, but never the disease. In order to talk about that (the love of money) you'd probably have to put capitalism itself in the dock and NO-ONE wants to do that. Capitalism is sacrosanct. Even the so-called "radicals" of Occupy Wall Street are always careful never to criticize that sacred cow; only some particular forms of it.

Why is capitalsm so sacred?

It implies that people are only motivated to get off the couch if they get paid. There is enough proof that money is not the major incentive for people, right?

Fame and being filthy righ does not make one happy. That is generally known, right?

99% of my posts are ironic. Maybe this post sides with the other 1%.
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Reply #13 posted 09/17/13 5:18pm

Timmy84

midnightmover said:

dJJ said:



I don't understand why it's never in the media.

I follow March against Monsanto on facebook. And I watch documentaries about it.

But when I talk to people about it, they really have no idea.

They also don't belief me when I tell them how dangerous that company is.

They think that if I was right, the government would have done something about them.


Unfortunately Monsanto owns the governments and judges.

What I just don't understand is why people accept this for such a long time already.

People accept it because they don't know about it. It's that simple. Even if they hear about it from time to time, it doesn't actually register because they can't actually believe that such evil could be happening in plain sight. They trust the government to protect them and they trust the media to inform them.

Monsanto are a Mafia organization. They started off manufacturing chemical weapons for use in war then turned those weapons into pesticides for agriculture even though there was no demand for it. Arms were twisted and arms have been twisted ever since. It's because there are real world conspiracies out there like this that I have little patience for the fantasy conspiracies of the Alex Jones crowd. They divert our attention away from the real bad guys. And there are PLENTY of real bad guys in the corporate, financial and political sectors.

The public's first mistake was trusting them in the first place...

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Reply #14 posted 09/18/13 5:57am

midnightmover

dJJ said:

midnightmover said:

You've heard the old saying that money is the root of all evil, right? Well, that's the beginning, the middle and the end of the story. We have allowed the pursuit of money to govern everything. It's the biggest failure of our age. And no-one really talks about it. They talk about the symptoms, but never the disease. In order to talk about that (the love of money) you'd probably have to put capitalism itself in the dock and NO-ONE wants to do that. Capitalism is sacrosanct. Even the so-called "radicals" of Occupy Wall Street are always careful never to criticize that sacred cow; only some particular forms of it.

Why is capitalism so sacred?

It's a hangover from the Cold War. Back then, we faced an existential threat from the Soviets. Anytime there is war like that you have to paint yourself as the embodiment of good and your enemy as the living embodiment of evil. Therefore since we were capitalist and they were communist, it meant capitalism had to be good. Being against capitalism was the same as being against good.

Of course this was appalling logic. What made our system better than theirs wasn't capitalism, it was democracy. We had it and they didn't. But propaganda has to be simple in order to be effective so this distinction was glossed over. Capitalism was Good. And anyone who questioned that was in league with the evil enemy. 25 years after the cold war ended we are still hampered by this prejudice. It's so ingrained that it's self-reinforcing. People deliberately stop themselves from facing the obvious problems with capitalism. This is why progressives just go around in circles all the time. Because they won't allow themselves to ask these bigger questions.

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Reply #15 posted 09/18/13 6:15am

midnightmover

Timmy84 said:

midnightmover said:

People accept it because they don't know about it. It's that simple. Even if they hear about it from time to time, it doesn't actually register because they can't actually believe that such evil could be happening in plain sight. They trust the government to protect them and they trust the media to inform them.

Monsanto are a Mafia organization. They started off manufacturing chemical weapons for use in war then turned those weapons into pesticides for agriculture even though there was no demand for it. Arms were twisted and arms have been twisted ever since. It's because there are real world conspiracies out there like this that I have little patience for the fantasy conspiracies of the Alex Jones crowd. They divert our attention away from the real bad guys. And there are PLENTY of real bad guys in the corporate, financial and political sectors.

The public's first mistake was trusting them in the first place...

That's too simplistic. The government is an essential entity that has done some great things, particularly in the last century. They provided an ESSENTIAL buffer to protect people from the callousness of the market economy. That's the main reason libertarians hate government. It restricts the ability of the exploiters to exploit. Of course there was always a tension between those who saw it as serving the people and those who wanted it to serve corporate and financial interests. The tragedy of our times is that the latter group has been very much on the front foot while the progressives have been constantly losing ground.

In short, government does good and bad things. Their support for Monsanto is a sign that they can't be trusted. But we should be careful not to paint too simplistic a picture. Demonising government plays into the hands of right-wingers. We need deeper criticisms than that. What are the values that are in play here? What is the bigger picture? Where are we going?

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Reply #16 posted 09/18/13 11:23am

Timmy84

midnightmover said:

Timmy84 said:

The public's first mistake was trusting them in the first place...

That's too simplistic. The government is an essential entity that has done some great things, particularly in the last century. They provided an ESSENTIAL buffer to protect people from the callousness of the market economy. That's the main reason libertarians hate government. It restricts the ability of the exploiters to exploit. Of course there was always a tension between those who saw it as serving the people and those who wanted it to serve corporate and financial interests. The tragedy of our times is that the latter group has been very much on the front foot while the progressives have been constantly losing ground.

In short, government does good and bad things. Their support for Monsanto is a sign that they can't be trusted. But we should be careful not to paint too simplistic a picture. Demonising government plays into the hands of right-wingers. We need deeper criticisms than that. What are the values that are in play here? What is the bigger picture? Where are we going?

I know. I just meant "these days". They definitely leave you puzzled.

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Reply #17 posted 09/20/13 2:31am

dJJ

So, Americans do know that Monsanto sells roundup and GMO that causes cancer and probably a lot more problems, but still don't do anything about it?

Monsanto has people as their puppets in the FDA, congress, highest courts, Washington and these people are protecting Monsanto.

Monsanto takes soothes the people by sending their staff to do Ted talks, write and moderate the Wiki pages internationally and makes sure that journalists who want to report are fired.


And Monsanto owns Blackwater, now called Akadimia, to spy on people. Monsanto makes sure that protesters against Monsanto get arrested and if people are critical about Monsanto on internet, they delete the critical posts.

This all is exactly the same behavior of a dictator who is ruling over his country.

So, when you say Americans think capatalism is good, because it represents democratic freedom.........I wonder why they don't mind a dictator who runs all those "democratic institutions"???

Because I don't see any freedom or democracy when in comes to Monsanto. Monsanto runs the media, law, courd decisions, FDA, congress and makes sure that every American eats their roudup or GMO.


99% of my posts are ironic. Maybe this post sides with the other 1%.
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Reply #18 posted 09/20/13 3:11am

dJJ

By the way, you actually can sign a petition against the protection act of Monsanto.

http://www.fooddemocracyn...ction_Act/

99% of my posts are ironic. Maybe this post sides with the other 1%.
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Reply #19 posted 09/20/13 11:04am

Timmy84

dJJ said:

By the way, you actually can sign a petition against the protection act of Monsanto.

http://www.fooddemocracyn...ction_Act/

Just signed. Thanks.

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Reply #20 posted 09/20/13 11:09am

Cloudbuster

avatar

They're fucking evil. That's what.

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Reply #21 posted 09/20/13 6:16pm

XxAxX

avatar

very scary company

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Reply #22 posted 09/21/13 3:36am

dJJ

XxAxX said:

very scary company


Yes. Why do they get away with it?

99% of my posts are ironic. Maybe this post sides with the other 1%.
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Reply #23 posted 09/21/13 11:36am

Tremolina

midnightmover said:

dJJ said:

Why is capitalism so sacred?

It's a hangover from the Cold War.

That's too simplistic. (American) Capitalism goes back much longer. The entire colonisation of the Americas was an extreme form of capitalism. EVERYTHING was "capitalised"; other people's lands and property, other people even. After the native American extinction and the abolition of slavery the groundworks were laid for a ruthless system, the core of which still exists today. It's called exploitation.

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Reply #24 posted 09/21/13 11:50am

Tremolina

I think Monsanto is a typical multinational, operating on the basic concept of capitalism.

Its extremely agressive way of "defending" its "intellectual property" is center to its ruthless business practices and its negative history is telling of its true nature.

But those facts do not prove that what they are doing as with regards to genetic modification is also wrong or "evil". Personally I am not a fan of GM and I think it must be treated with the upmost care, thus not being put into the hands of ruthless businessmen. Monsanto seems like it is hellbvend on making us believe that they are actually "good". Which makes it even more suspect.

But there are plus sides to GM as well, and there is not a hard case against Monsanto that they are truly trying to poison our food and food production.

So I am against them, and in line with much of the negativity against it, but not all of it.

Something to "put it into perspective" perhabs:

Monsanto: More Saint than Sinner

By Ross Pomeroy

Monsanto is the Devil Incarnate, a ruthless corporation hell bent upon forcing their unnatural food down our open gullets. The soy and corn they sow are more likely to transmogrify us into imps than sustain us.

At least that's what a lot of people seem to believe these days.

Poring over Monsanto's well documented past, the company's haters might have a point. The company was instrumental in manufacturing the much maligned insecticide DDT as well as the herbicide Agent Orange. The latter may have caused as many as 400,000 deaths in Vietnam from its use by the U.S. military as a chemical warfare agent. Moreover, the company has been criminally complacent in many cases of environmental pollution, including a sinister occurrence in Alabama in which the company "drenched" a town in toxic industrial coolants for 40 years.

Yes, Monsanto has done some bad things, and unfortunately for them, their relentless dedication to being a successful company has stifled public forgiveness.

Monsanto showers politicians with contributions and employs a cadre of well-connected lobbyists. These actions recently secured passage of what's been misleadingly dubbed the "Monsanto Protection Act," which simply prevents unpredictable court decisionsfrom restricting the sale and distribution of genetically modified seeds. Right or wrong, this provided its critics with more ammunition.

Moreover, Monsanto mercilessly defends its intellectual property. Since the mid-1990s the corporation has filed suit against 145 individual farmers for patent infringement, never losing a single case.

This trend continued on Monday, when the Supreme Court unanimously ruled against an Indiana farmer who attempted to circumvent Monsanto's rules. The small-time farmer now must pay the multibillion-dollar company a sum of $80,000. This surely won't endear any new fans to the controversial company, instead providing more material to the Monsanto hatemongers, who have littered the Internet with tales of treachery and diatribes against supposedly insidious genetically modified organisms.

But their story is far from the whole story.

Back in 1970, Monsanto chemist John Franz invented a herbicide called glyphosate. In the half-century that has since passed, the substance has been he... herbicide," leading to substantially higher crop yields without damaging the environment. Scrutiny over the years has revealed the herbicide to be less acutely toxic than Tylenol and to degrade quickly in the soil. In order for farmers to make full use of the herbicide, Monsanto engineered strains of various crops to be immune to glyphosate. Now, American farmers average ...n per acre each year, up from 109.5 in 1979.

Monsanto has also been key to the development of golden rice, a genetically modified strain which provides a significant am...er serving. Vitamin A deficiency plagues many parts of the developing world, resulting in as many as one million deaths and 500,000 cases of irrevers...s annually (PDF). If widely planted, golden rice could very well abate this tragedy.

Monsanto's noble efforts have garnered the adoration of numerous, notable do-gooders, including philanthropist Bill Gates and agricultural scientist Norman Borlaug, the Nobel Peace Prize winner whose dwarf wheat revolutionized agriculture, saving an estimated one billion lives from starvation. Before he died in 2009, Borlaug extolled Monsanto's use of genetic modification, believing science to be the best hope for feeding a growing world population.

"We've been genetically modifying plants and animals for a long time. Long before we called it science, people were selecting the best breeds," he said in an interview with Houston Chronicle.

Let's be honest, Monsanto is simply the "evil corporation du jour." Microsoft, Nike, Wal-Mart, and McDonalds have all taken turns.

Monsanto has certainly done some sinful things, but the good they've wrought far outweighs the bad. Otherwise, they probably wouldn't be in business.

Ross Pomeroy is the assistant editor of RealClearScience. Follow him on Twitter @SteRoPo.

http://www.realclearscience.com/articles/2013/05/15/monsanto_more_saint_than_sinner_106533.html

In defense of Monsanto

I want to talk about something today, and I hope that it does not result in my office getting burned down. But I work in a basement, so I guess its not that much of an issue. Genetically modified crops — devil incarnate or world savior? Solution to the hunger problem, or a capitalist venture? Each of these holds a little bit of truth, and I want to explore a side of the debate that isn’t normally discussed in the press — GM crops as the good guys.

When talking about genetically modified crops, Monsanto is, for the most part, the centerpiece of conversation. Debates, if they can even be called that, are riddled with hearsay, rumors, myths, “I read this” or “I heard that.” It seems to me that most people simply have absolutely no idea what they are talking about. And those who do have some knowledge on the subject are focusing on all the wrong things.
As bad press and political heat goes, Monsanto is on the sharp end of it more often than not. The “liberal” media paints Monsanto as a mean, heartless company, set on destroying any and all competition.
So Monsanto has some rather shrewd business practices … all successful companies do. They have some of the most consistently stable stock prices on Wall Street, and have earned massive investments from both Bill Gates and Warren Buffet. So what is it about Monsanto that the public finds so appalling? Most of the arguments I have heard against this company are that Monsanto destroys the small farmer. While many small farmers are bankrupt by lawsuits with Monsanto, it is merely the result of Monsanto defending its intellectual property … to the death.

Monsanto makes a large percentage of its money from licensing patented genes to other companies. They have contracts with Dow Chemical, Syngenta, Novartis and many others. Monsanto is truly ruthless in its negotiations when licensing out its patents, and it should be.

No one is forcing these companies to license with Monsanto, no one is forcing farmers to buy Monsanto seeds. But good products cost more, and consumers (farmers and other corporations in this case) are willing to pay the premium that Monsanto charges for good products. Good products cost more. That’s business. That’s how the world works.

There is some humor I find in this situation, and that is the complete hypocrisy of the hoards of internet users who rush to vilify Monsanto. How many of the people writing about this company are typing on a computer made by Apple and manufactured by Foxconn? A computer made in factories with such terrible working conditions that Foxconn had to install bars on the windows to prevent suicides due to low pay and illegal overtime. Employees even need to sign away the right for their family or any of their descendants to sue the company in the case of death. I myself am guilty of owning multiple Apple products. I am willing to pay that premium because Apple products are beautiful and functional.

How many of these writers are wearing Nike shoes, manufactured by children paid pennies per day? I find it completely asinine that these individuals who claim to hold themselves to such a high moral standard are so selective in their moral battles. They buy a $2,000 computer and then blog about the unfairness of big corporations.

Now don’t get me wrong — I do understand that there is a fundamental difference between bad labor practices for something you wear or use, like a computer, and a genetically modified food product that you assimilate into your body. There is an intimacy related to food that does not exist with shoes or computers; the food that you eat is broken down on a molecular level and literally becomes part of you.

After doing my homework for this column, I came to the realization that there are in fact many reasons to hate, or at least avoid, Monsanto.

First, the excessive enforcement of patents. Monsanto has customers sign end-user license agreements (EULAs) that prevent the replication and even the study of their seeds. These EULAs forbid independent research and can block unflattering findings from being published.

Another frowned upon practice is the implementation of the Terminator and the Zombie. The infamous Monsanto patent #5,723,765, a.k.a., the Terminator gene, is for a gene that makes all seeds of Monsanto crops completely sterile. The Zombie gene is similar to the Terminator gene except that sterility can be reversed by spraying a chemical, made by Monsanto, that triggers fertility.

One of the last points I want to make is that the general public has an uncanny knack for remembering every mistake in history and forgetting the good parts. Monsanto is often condemned as as the manufacturer of Agent Orange and the other “Rainbow Herbicides” during the Vietnam War. What surprises me yet again about the public is that they cry murder for a chemical that was meant to kill crops, and had the unfortunate side effect of stillbirths and infant deformations, but that same public seems to develop complete amnesia regarding companies who design products with the sole purpose of taking life. There are easily close to a hundred weapons manufacturers just in the United States.

And finally, I want to talk about consumer stupidity. Hate me, don’t hate me; I really don’t care, but it is my honest opinion that the average consumer is not educated enough to know what a GMO is, or educated enough to make decisions about GMO legislation. I read dozens of bloggers’ posts about GMOs and many of them are under the idiotic impression that GMO is a chemical that is added to plants.

Monsanto may have questionable-at-best legal practices, but they have achieved the ultimate corporate success — government support the likes of which hasn’t been seen since the times of John D. Rockefeller and Standard Oil. Our government turns a relatively blind eye toward Monsanto’s activities because Monsanto has branded itself as “agents of a future prosperity that will trickle down to all.”

Let’s for one moment imagine a world without Monsanto. Without the Golden Rice engineered by Monsanto, millions of malnourished individuals would die every year of Vitamin A deficiency, and nearly half a million more from blindness caused by Vitamin A deficiency.

I am by no means suggesting that Monsanto is a good company. Their level of social standards leave much to be desired. What I am saying is that if you want to launch a campaign of hate and protest against a multinational, multi-billion dollar company, at least educate yourself enough to know what you are talking about.

And ask yourself this: Is it worth sacrificing the hundreds of thousands of lives saved every year by Monsanto’s products just to destroy the company that bankrupt the small farmer down the street?

HUDSON LOFCHIE can be reached at science@theaggie.org.

http://www.theaggie.org/2013/01/16/in-defense-of-monsanto/
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Reply #25 posted 09/21/13 1:40pm

dJJ

Monsanto messes with nature and humans, for profit.

They know it's harmful, and they made sure they can't be held accountable.

They knowingly misinform people, by persuading people GMO is good, they have an army & an PR-army.

They are not like any other company. They prevent us from knowing that we are actually eating GMO or food that is sprayed with Round up. They limit our freedom of choice by limiting our knowledge. They don't allow GMO-labeling and they decide what the media and on internet is published about Monsanto and what not.

Monsanto really can't be compared with any other company.

The examples of how fantastic Monsanto is, are old and have proven to be very unhealthy. There is a very high level of arenicum in rice since Monsanto's dominance on that market. Rice is poison now.

The crops they say are doing so much better, don't have any seeds. So, they just make farmers depend on Roundup and Monsanto seeds. That has nothing to do with altruisticly feeding humanity. It's only about grabbing more money at the cost of the healt of humans.

But, people don't want to realize how horrific it is. It's easier to pretend it's not so bad and can't be that harmful.

Tremolina said:

I think Monsanto is a typical multinational, operating on the basic concept of capitalism.

Its extremely agressive way of "defending" its "intellectual property" is center to its ruthless business practices and its negative history is telling of its true nature.

But those facts do not prove that what they are doing as with regards to genetic modification is also wrong or "evil". Personally I am not a fan of GM and I think it must be treated with the upmost care, thus not being put into the hands of ruthless businessmen. Monsanto seems like it is hellbvend on making us believe that they are actually "good". Which makes it even more suspect.

But there are plus sides to GM as well, and there is not a hard case against Monsanto that they are truly trying to poison our food and food production.

So I am against them, and in line with much of the negativity against it, but not all of it.

Something to "put it into perspective" perhabs:

Monsanto: More Saint than Sinner

By Ross Pomeroy

Monsanto is the Devil Incarnate, a ruthless corporation hell bent upon forcing their unnatural food down our open gullets. The soy and corn they sow are more likely to transmogrify us into imps than sustain us.

At least that's what a lot of people seem to believe these days.

Poring over Monsanto's well documented past, the company's haters might have a point. The company was instrumental in manufacturing the much maligned insecticide DDT as well as the herbicide Agent Orange. The latter may have caused as many as 400,000 deaths in Vietnam from its use by the U.S. military as a chemical warfare agent. Moreover, the company has been criminally complacent in many cases of environmental pollution, including a sinister occurrence in Alabama in which the company "drenched" a town in toxic industrial coolants for 40 years.

Yes, Monsanto has done some bad things, and unfortunately for them, their relentless dedication to being a successful company has stifled public forgiveness.

Monsanto showers politicians with contributions and employs a cadre of well-connected lobbyists. These actions recently secured passage of what's been misleadingly dubbed the "Monsanto Protection Act," which simply prevents unpredictable court decisionsfrom restricting the sale and distribution of genetically modified seeds. Right or wrong, this provided its critics with more ammunition.

Moreover, Monsanto mercilessly defends its intellectual property. Since the mid-1990s the corporation has filed suit against 145 individual farmers for patent infringement, never losing a single case.

This trend continued on Monday, when the Supreme Court unanimously ruled against an Indiana farmer who attempted to circumvent Monsanto's rules. The small-time farmer now must pay the multibillion-dollar company a sum of $80,000. This surely won't endear any new fans to the controversial company, instead providing more material to the Monsanto hatemongers, who have littered the Internet with tales of treachery and diatribes against supposedly insidious genetically modified organisms.

But their story is far from the whole story.

Back in 1970, Monsanto chemist John Franz invented a herbicide called glyphosate. In the half-century that has since passed, the substance has been he... herbicide," leading to substantially higher crop yields without damaging the environment. Scrutiny over the years has revealed the herbicide to be less acutely toxic than Tylenol and to degrade quickly in the soil. In order for farmers to make full use of the herbicide, Monsanto engineered strains of various crops to be immune to glyphosate. Now, American farmers average ...n per acre each year, up from 109.5 in 1979.

Monsanto has also been key to the development of golden rice, a genetically modified strain which provides a significant am...er serving. Vitamin A deficiency plagues many parts of the developing world, resulting in as many as one million deaths and 500,000 cases of irrevers...s annually (PDF). If widely planted, golden rice could very well abate this tragedy.

Monsanto's noble efforts have garnered the adoration of numerous, notable do-gooders, including philanthropist Bill Gates and agricultural scientist Norman Borlaug, the Nobel Peace Prize winner whose dwarf wheat revolutionized agriculture, saving an estimated one billion lives from starvation. Before he died in 2009, Borlaug extolled Monsanto's use of genetic modification, believing science to be the best hope for feeding a growing world population.

"We've been genetically modifying plants and animals for a long time. Long before we called it science, people were selecting the best breeds," he said in an interview with Houston Chronicle.

Let's be honest, Monsanto is simply the "evil corporation du jour." Microsoft, Nike, Wal-Mart, and McDonalds have all taken turns.

Monsanto has certainly done some sinful things, but the good they've wrought far outweighs the bad. Otherwise, they probably wouldn't be in business.

Ross Pomeroy is the assistant editor of RealClearScience. Follow him on Twitter @SteRoPo.

http://www.realclearscience.com/articles/2013/05/15/monsanto_more_saint_than_sinner_106533.html

In defense of Monsanto

I want to talk about something today, and I hope that it does not result in my office getting burned down. But I work in a basement, so I guess its not that much of an issue. Genetically modified crops — devil incarnate or world savior? Solution to the hunger problem, or a capitalist venture? Each of these holds a little bit of truth, and I want to explore a side of the debate that isn’t normally discussed in the press — GM crops as the good guys.

When talking about genetically modified crops, Monsanto is, for the most part, the centerpiece of conversation. Debates, if they can even be called that, are riddled with hearsay, rumors, myths, “I read this” or “I heard that.” It seems to me that most people simply have absolutely no idea what they are talking about. And those who do have some knowledge on the subject are focusing on all the wrong things.
As bad press and political heat goes, Monsanto is on the sharp end of it more often than not. The “liberal” media paints Monsanto as a mean, heartless company, set on destroying any and all competition.
So Monsanto has some rather shrewd business practices … all successful companies do. They have some of the most consistently stable stock prices on Wall Street, and have earned massive investments from both Bill Gates and Warren Buffet. So what is it about Monsanto that the public finds so appalling? Most of the arguments I have heard against this company are that Monsanto destroys the small farmer. While many small farmers are bankrupt by lawsuits with Monsanto, it is merely the result of Monsanto defending its intellectual property … to the death.

Monsanto makes a large percentage of its money from licensing patented genes to other companies. They have contracts with Dow Chemical, Syngenta, Novartis and many others. Monsanto is truly ruthless in its negotiations when licensing out its patents, and it should be.

No one is forcing these companies to license with Monsanto, no one is forcing farmers to buy Monsanto seeds. But good products cost more, and consumers (farmers and other corporations in this case) are willing to pay the premium that Monsanto charges for good products. Good products cost more. That’s business. That’s how the world works.

There is some humor I find in this situation, and that is the complete hypocrisy of the hoards of internet users who rush to vilify Monsanto. How many of the people writing about this company are typing on a computer made by Apple and manufactured by Foxconn? A computer made in factories with such terrible working conditions that Foxconn had to install bars on the windows to prevent suicides due to low pay and illegal overtime. Employees even need to sign away the right for their family or any of their descendants to sue the company in the case of death. I myself am guilty of owning multiple Apple products. I am willing to pay that premium because Apple products are beautiful and functional.

How many of these writers are wearing Nike shoes, manufactured by children paid pennies per day? I find it completely asinine that these individuals who claim to hold themselves to such a high moral standard are so selective in their moral battles. They buy a $2,000 computer and then blog about the unfairness of big corporations.

Now don’t get me wrong — I do understand that there is a fundamental difference between bad labor practices for something you wear or use, like a computer, and a genetically modified food product that you assimilate into your body. There is an intimacy related to food that does not exist with shoes or computers; the food that you eat is broken down on a molecular level and literally becomes part of you.

After doing my homework for this column, I came to the realization that there are in fact many reasons to hate, or at least avoid, Monsanto.

First, the excessive enforcement of patents. Monsanto has customers sign end-user license agreements (EULAs) that prevent the replication and even the study of their seeds. These EULAs forbid independent research and can block unflattering findings from being published.

Another frowned upon practice is the implementation of the Terminator and the Zombie. The infamous Monsanto patent #5,723,765, a.k.a., the Terminator gene, is for a gene that makes all seeds of Monsanto crops completely sterile. The Zombie gene is similar to the Terminator gene except that sterility can be reversed by spraying a chemical, made by Monsanto, that triggers fertility.

One of the last points I want to make is that the general public has an uncanny knack for remembering every mistake in history and forgetting the good parts. Monsanto is often condemned as as the manufacturer of Agent Orange and the other “Rainbow Herbicides” during the Vietnam War. What surprises me yet again about the public is that they cry murder for a chemical that was meant to kill crops, and had the unfortunate side effect of stillbirths and infant deformations, but that same public seems to develop complete amnesia regarding companies who design products with the sole purpose of taking life. There are easily close to a hundred weapons manufacturers just in the United States.

And finally, I want to talk about consumer stupidity. Hate me, don’t hate me; I really don’t care, but it is my honest opinion that the average consumer is not educated enough to know what a GMO is, or educated enough to make decisions about GMO legislation. I read dozens of bloggers’ posts about GMOs and many of them are under the idiotic impression that GMO is a chemical that is added to plants.

Monsanto may have questionable-at-best legal practices, but they have achieved the ultimate corporate success — government support the likes of which hasn’t been seen since the times of John D. Rockefeller and Standard Oil. Our government turns a relatively blind eye toward Monsanto’s activities because Monsanto has branded itself as “agents of a future prosperity that will trickle down to all.”

Let’s for one moment imagine a world without Monsanto. Without the Golden Rice engineered by Monsanto, millions of malnourished individuals would die every year of Vitamin A deficiency, and nearly half a million more from blindness caused by Vitamin A deficiency.

I am by no means suggesting that Monsanto is a good company. Their level of social standards leave much to be desired. What I am saying is that if you want to launch a campaign of hate and protest against a multinational, multi-billion dollar company, at least educate yourself enough to know what you are talking about.

And ask yourself this: Is it worth sacrificing the hundreds of thousands of lives saved every year by Monsanto’s products just to destroy the company that bankrupt the small farmer down the street?

HUDSON LOFCHIE can be reached at science@theaggie.org.

http://www.theaggie.org/2013/01/16/in-defense-of-monsanto/

99% of my posts are ironic. Maybe this post sides with the other 1%.
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Reply #26 posted 09/21/13 1:48pm

Tremolina

^ GMO is everwhere: fact. If you think it's only Monsanto you are sorrily mistaken.

Taking your argument the whole world is messing with nature and humans.

And perhabs that is true.

Like I said, I am not a fan of GM, let alone Monsanto.

But you are not offering any evidence of how bad they are "messing with nature".

You suggest they are criminals and there is something to be said for that because of their past and their intellectual property practices.

But the GM? Aren't all these poor farmers they are sueing to death using it for a good reason?

Is it a lie that the "golden rice" has done much good?
Offer some evidence why it is so bad, and I am more than willing to listen and agree with you, but not just to fear based arguments.


--

[Edited 9/21/13 13:50pm]

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Reply #27 posted 09/21/13 1:54pm

SuperFurryAnim
al

avatar

HIV and hepatocellular and esophageal carcinomas related to consumption of mycotoxin-prone foods in sub-Saharan Africa.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20484447

The Empire is on the run!
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Reply #28 posted 09/21/13 3:23pm

Tremolina

SuperFurryAnimal said:

HIV and hepatocellular and esophageal carcinomas related to consumption of mycotoxin-prone foods in sub-Saharan Africa.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20484447



Why would you post that?

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Reply #29 posted 09/21/13 3:24pm

Tremolina

Timmy84 said:

I know Monsanto's dangerous. THAT I know. No surprise they would edit it back to where it was on Wikipedia after you edited. You got people who are gonna make sure the truth is hidden as they often do.

disbelief

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