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Thread started 07/09/12 5:45pm

prittypriss

The Case for Cosmic Consciousness

There has been scientific research that has been done to show a strong possibility that Cosmic Consciousness exists:

On community, societal and even worldwide levels, more than 20 experiments, published in respected scientific journals, have demonstrated that Transcendental Meditation groups, representing 1% of a target population, have caused significant improvements in social indicators of quality of life, health and mental health, and have reduced crime, accidents, conflict and war, apparently by reducing stress in the corresponding population.

These experiments have shown that a group of individuals involved in meditation have had an impact on the society upon which they have focused, with the above results. The studies have been published in respected scientific journals.

A 1993 study found that, when 4,000 people meditated together, violent crime in Washington, D.C., declined 23% over the course of the experiment, in contrast to its rising in the months before and after. The results were shown not to be due to other variables, such as weather, the police, or anti-crime campaigns. The predicted effect had been posited with an independent review board, which had participated in the study design and monitored its conduct. A similar effect was shown in a study of 24 U.S. cities, in which 1% of the urban population regularly practiced TM (Transcendental Meditation). A follow-up study demonstrated that the 24 cities saw drops of 22% in crime and 89% in the crime trend, compared to increases of 2% and 53%, respectively, in the control cities.

This research shows that when a group of people engage in a meditation together, focusing their energy inward, toward the 3rd eye, they can have a profound effect on the area surrounding them. The populations within the urban areas were not aware of the Trascendental Meditation experiments were ongoing, and therefore their behaviors were not in any way effected by the thought that these meditations would help them. This implies then that the meditators were accessing something else that tied everyone else together in the community, something that would have an impact upon each individual and their behaviors.

During a two-month period in 1983 in Israel, on days when a TM-Sidhi group equaling the square root of 1% of the surrounding population meditated, independently published data showed that war-related deaths in Lebanon dropped 76%, and conflict, traffic fatalities, fires and crime decreased. In Israel, the national mood increased, as measured by a blinded content analysis of the emotional tone of the lead, front-page picture story in the Jerusalem Post, and the stock market increased. Other potential causal variables were controlled for. Predictions regarding war-reduction in Lebanon and increased quality of life in Israel had been posited with two independent project review board of scientists before the experiments began. The study was subsequently repeated seven times, with statistically significant effects. Research in five conflict-ridden locations around the globe, in the U.S., and worldwide (via TM-Sidhi assemblies of 7,000 practitioners, equal to the square root of 1% of the world’s population in the mid-1980s) produced similar effects.

Again, the experiments had a statistical significant effects on the neighboring areas.

Several researchers have studied entrainment, or physiological synchronization, between people during moments of empathy. In one experiment at HeartMath, two participants faced each other at a distance of five feet and practiced an emotion-restructuring exercise that has been shown to produce sustained states of internal physiological coherence.

The alpha brain waves of one subject (measured via an EEG) became precisely synchronized with the R-waves (peak of the waves reflected in an ECG) carried by the magnetic field from the heart of the other subject. “These data show that it is possible for the magnetic signals radiated by the heart of one individual to influence the brain rhythms of another at conversational distances…. The degree of coherence in the receiver’s heart rhythms appears to determine whether his/her brain waves synchronize to the other person’s heart.” Similar results have been obtained by other researchers and in other experiments conducted by HeartMath. For example, Linda Russek and Gary Schwartz found that people who more regularly experience positive emotions such as love and care are better receivers of others’ magnetic-field signals.

Based on the results of these and other experiments, the researchers at HeartMath concluded:

The nervous system acts as an antenna, which is tuned to and responds to the magnetic fields produced by the hearts of other individuals. This cardioelectromagnetic communication is an innate ability that heightens awareness and mediates important aspects of true empathy and sensitivity to others. It can be enhanced, resulting in a much deeper level of non-verbal communication, understanding, and connection between people…. [It] has the potential to promote the healing process. From an electrophysiological perspective, it appears that sensitivity to information contained in the fields generated by others is related to the ability to be emotionally and physiologically coherent. During coherence, internal systems are more stable, function more efficiently, and radiate electromagnetic fields containing a more coherent structure.

Besides this heart-to-brain communication, the hearts of different individuals have been found to influence each other (heart-to-heart communication).

Despite the typical methodological issues that need to be worked out in any new area of research, a number of experiments has indicated that tele-prehension of thoughts, images, emotions, intuitions and physical sensations between persons is facilitated when people are bound by close emotional ties and empathy (e.g., “bonded couples” or monozygotic twins), are in an altered state of consciousness, or meditate together, although this effect occurs in other situations, too. The respective EEG brain wave patterns of pairs become highly synchronized or coherent. EEG alpha rhythms or visually evoked potentials (measured by a functional MRI machine) created in one person can produce the same effects in another, even when members of a pair are separated in sound-attenuated or electromagnetically shielded rooms. In addition, in several experiments, individual interhemispheric synchronization occurred (a phenomena that happens during meditation) when paired participants tried to sense each other’s presence while in separate rooms. Moreover, the individual with the greatest synchronization tended to influence the other member of the pair.

Ervin Laszlo has attributed this phenomenon to field effects. Karl Pribram has theorized that our brain perceives objects not primarily through language or images, but by resonating or getting in synch with them. “To know the world is literally to be on its wavelength.”

And there are numerous other experiments that have shown a connection between people that cannot be explained in any other way, except through some field of consciousness. If there are magnetic fields that cannot be seen, but the results of such fields are seen, or gravity fields, again which are not seen but the results of which can be seen, then it is highly possible there is a field of consciousness, a field of "something", from which people respond and react to in very deep and surprising ways. Some of the research has even involved distance healing, remote viewing, etc. The government has even used remote viewing in many experiments, and have found it to be useful in some instances. How can one view an area, a person in that area, in which they have never been to, and do so with an amazing accuracy, unless they are tapping into some kind of cosmic "knowing"?

[Edited 7/9/12 17:48pm]

"I gave my life to become the person I am right now. Was it worth it?" ~ Richard Bach

https://www.jewelryincand..._and_scene
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Reply #1 posted 07/09/12 6:03pm

prittypriss

I found this one to be intriguing:

In 1998, Nelson began calling the machines EGGs, or ElectroGaiaGrams, and decided to enlist 40 other scientists in setting up a global network of devices. His goal was to test for something like the “noosphere”, Teilhard de Chardin’s term for a field of intelligence that he believed surrounded the earth. Through Nelson’s Global Consciousness Project (http://noosphere.princeton.edu), researchers have been studying the correlated effect that world events have upon the random numbers generated by the EGGs. According to the Project’s hypothesis, a positive deviation from randomness is predicted.

Researchers so far have found that some events have been correlated with significant results (for example, Princess Diana’s death, New Year’s celebrations, and 9/11, one of the most striking results ). Nelson believes these events captivated public attention. During all the public ceremonies for Diana, the degree of coherence was 100 to one against chance. Based upon various independent data analyses of results observed on 9/11 from the EGGs network, performed by Nelson,Radin, Peter Bancel, and Richard Shoup, together with a critical analysis by Edwin May and James Spottiswoode, Nelson offered the following interpretation of the strong deviations from randomness that with correlated with the major events of September 11:

"We do not have a theoretical understanding of the sort that must underlie robust interpretations…but I would like to describe a speculation…that the instruments have captured the reaction of a global consciousness…. Based on evidence that individuals and groups manifest something we can tentatively call a consciousness field, we hypothesized that there could be a global consciousness capable of the same thing…. It would seem that the new, integrated mind is just beginning to be active, paying attention only to events that inspire strong coherence of attention and feeling. Perhaps the best image is an infant slowly developing awareness, but already capable of strong emotions…. The EGG network reacted in a powerful and evocative way. While there are certainly sensible alternative explanations, this is not a mistake or a misreading. It can be interpreted as a clear, if indirect, confirmation of the hypothesis that the EGGs’ behavior is affected by global events and our reactions to them…. The results from this scientific study are an apparent manifestation of the ancient idea that we are all interconnected, and that what we think and feel has an effect on others."

If Nelson’s speculations are borne out by further research, then humanity has inherited a new responsibility: to be conscious of the impact of our pooled thought and feeling.

"I gave my life to become the person I am right now. Was it worth it?" ~ Richard Bach

https://www.jewelryincand..._and_scene
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Reply #2 posted 07/09/12 6:24pm

prittypriss

And one more point:

Wilber’s integral model of development is very important, in terms of hypothesizing and studying the relationships between development, human capacities, subtle energies and field effects. According to the Vedanta and Vajrayana traditions, only when individuals have consciously developed a particular level of consciousness can they permanently realize, access and master the correlated states of consciousness and behaviors, “converting ‘temporary states’ to ‘permanent traits’”. Research has supported this view by finding, for example, that the dreams of infants and children do not contain or express capacities associated with the higher levels of consciousness, such as formal operational thought, postconventional images and morality, etc. Such contents only appear during early adulthood. Furthermore, although an infant exhibits energy fields associated with the families of gross, subtle and causal (described earlier in this paper), because it enters waking, dreaming and sleeping states;it does not possess the species and subspecies energy fields because it has not developed the correlated stages of consciousness.


To illuminate the difference between temporary states and permanent traits, we can examine what happens when a crisis (such as a flood or earthquake) occurs in a community. In such situations, community members often respond in remarkable ways: they demonstrate full commitment to the common good, work tirelessly on its behalf, collaborate in extraordinary ways, and exhibit great levels of compassion, care, altruism and effort. They often describe the experience of communion, community and collaboration as a rare and singular peak experience. Although this experience may result in an ongoing transformation for some, most community members and the community itself typically return to ordinary behavior within a relatively short period of time after the crisis subsides, as old patterns and habits subsume the temporary state of collective consciousness.

But those who transform, whether through a conversion experience or ongoing practice, and then reside in the transpersonal levels of consciousness, seem to be able to express collective consciousness regularly and relatively consistently. At some point, they experience what I call “the communion of the heart.” They begin to evidence ongoing care for the common good and to exhibit consistently collaborative intention and skills, no matter what situation they are in, no matter what group, organization of community they are involved with at any particular time.

We now stand at a critical juncture, where we can begin to interface the modes of inquiry and the findings of the wisdom and scientific traditions. By stripping most metaphysical constructs from the wisdom-tradition consciousness model in his recent work,Wilber has opened more of the model’s stages to scientific investigation. Scientists studying human development have already described at least 12 major levels of consciousness, which can be studied in at least 24 developmental lines. Furthermore, in the online draft of his latest book, Wilber has begun to integrate these scientific findings and the various wisdom-tradition versions of the human chakra system into his integral model of development, thereby correlating them with the states and stages of consciousness and their associated energy fields. Wilber’s synthesis provides a comprehensive framework to study scientifically the relationship between human development, character, collective consciousness, and related, sustainable capacities and skills. To realize the individual and social benefits of developing collective consciousness and wisdom, which have been suggested by the research described in this paper and by applied disciplines such as organizational and community development, we need to learn how to develop these sustainable collaborative capacities and skills.

"I gave my life to become the person I am right now. Was it worth it?" ~ Richard Bach

https://www.jewelryincand..._and_scene
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Reply #3 posted 07/09/12 7:02pm

B1tchierThanEv
er

avatar


"The studies have been published in respected scientific journals."

I'd like to see those.

Guess I picked a bad year to quit drinking...
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Reply #4 posted 07/09/12 8:21pm

prittypriss

B1tchierThanEver said:


"The studies have been published in respected scientific journals."

I'd like to see those.

Crew, F. A. E. (1936, pp. 61-101). A repetition of McDougall’s Lamarckian experiment. The Journal of Genetics, 33.

Sheldrake, R. (1992a). An experimental test of the hypothesis of formative causation. Biology Forum, 85, 431-443.

Sheldrake, R. (1992b). Rose refuted. Biology Forum, 85, 455-460.

Radin, D. (March-May, 2003, pp. 8-13 & 44-45). For whom the bell tolls: A question of global consciousness. IONS Noetic Sciences Review.

246Nelson, R., et al. (1998). Global resonance of consciousness: Princess Diana and Mother Theresa. Electronic Journal of Parapsychology. Available: http://www.psy.uva.nl/ejap or http://www.princeton.edu/...diana.html.

Nelson, R. D. (2002). Terrorist disaster: September 11, 2001. Available: Global Consciousness Project, http://noosphere.princeton.edu.

Blasband, R. (1995, June 15-17). The ordering of random events by emotional expression. Paper presented to the 14th Annual Meeting of the Society for Scientific Exploration, Huntington Beach, CA.

Bierman, D. J. (1996). Exploring correlations between local emotional and global emotional events and the behavior of a random number generator. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 10, 363-374.

Radin, D., Rebman, J. M., & Cross, M. P. (1996). Anomalous organization of random events by group consciousness: Two exploratory experiments. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 10, 143-168.

Nelson, R. D. et al. FieldREGII: consciousness field effects: replications and explorations. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 12 (3), 425-454.

Nelson, R. (1997, July). FieldREG measurements in Egypt: resonant consciousness at sacred sites. PEAR Technical Note 97002. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, School of Engineering.

Radin, D., & Nelson, R. (1989). Evidence for consciousness-related anomalies in random physical systems. Foundations of Physics, 19 (12), 1499-1514. Other experiments regarding the effect of intention upon REGs have been conducted, such as: Peoc’h, R. (1995). Psychokinetic action of young chicks on the path of an “illuminated source”. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 9 (2), 223.

Dunne, B. J., & Jahn, R. G. (1992). Experiments in remote human/machine interaction. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 6 (4), 311-312.

Jahn, R. G., & Dunne, B. J. (1997). Correlations of random binary sequences with prestated operator intention: A review of a 12-year program. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 11, 345-367.

Sered, S. S. (January 28, 2002). Healing and religion: A Jewish perspective. The Yale Journal for Humanities in Medicine, 1-2.

Kaplan, G. A., et al. (1988). Social connections and morality from all causes and from cardiovascular disease: Perspective evidence from Eastern Finland. American Journal of Epidemiology, 128, 370-380.

Vogt, T. M., Mullooly, J. P., Ernst, D., Pope, C. R., & Hollis, J. F. (1992). Social networks as predictors of ischemic heart disease, cancer, stroke, and hypertension. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 45, 659-666.

House, J. S., Landis, K. R., & Umberson, D. (1988). Social relationships and health. Science, 241, 540-545.

Pugh, N., Walton, K. G., & Kavanaugh, K. L. (November 13-18, 1988). Can time series analysis of serotonin turnover test the theory that consciousness is a field? Paper presented at the 18th annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, Toronto, ON. Society of Neuroscience Abstracts, 14, 372.

Walton, K. G., Cavanagh, K. L., & Pugh, N. D. (In press). Effect of group practice of the Transcendental Meditation program on biochemical indicators of stress in non-meditators: Causal analysis of a field theory of consciousness. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality.

Orme-Johnson, D. W., & Walton, K. G. (1998). All approaches to preventing or reversing stress are not the same. American Journal of Health Promotion, 12, 297-299.

Jevning, R., Wallace, R., & Beidebach, M. (1992). The physiology of meditation: A review. A wakeful, hypometabolic, integrated response. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 16, 415-424.

***There are many more cited references that I can post. But perhaps this following can lead you to more citations and summary of the research.

An extensive body of research has been conducted regarding the impact of collective consciousness, via the practice of transcendental meditation by groups, upon indicators of social cohesion and health (e.g., homicides, suicides, traffic fatalities, unemployment, conflict, and quality of life). Beyond what I describe in this paper, all the research is summarized at www.mum.edu/tm_research/s...m_res.html.

*****My notes: I will state that some of the claims made by this particular school I have not researched or looked into and cannot validate whether the research has been supported by other researchers out side of this school. However, the research related to meditation and it's impact upon the community, I have read in journals by independent researchers that are not related to this school, and know they found similar findings. I also know that research has supported the impact of meditation upon an individual's well-being, reduction in anxiety, assistance in helping to decrease recidivism rates of crimes/prisoners, decreasing of the progression of some diseases, etc. This is research that I had to keep up on in my field of work when dealing with hospice patients and individuals with chronic diseases, because meditation has been found to be very effective in working with them. I have taught many patients effective meditation methods which have resulted in a decreased need for pain medications, decreased depression and anxiety, a slowing down of the disease process, etc. Even some doctors are now suggesting meditations to their patients as a way to deal with pain and other diseases.

[Edited 7/9/12 20:45pm]

"I gave my life to become the person I am right now. Was it worth it?" ~ Richard Bach

https://www.jewelryincand..._and_scene
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Reply #5 posted 07/09/12 8:24pm

prittypriss

Research studies on the Transcendental Meditation® technique have been published in more than 100 journals.

Academy of Management Journal
Addictive Behaviors
Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly
American Journal of Cardiology
American Journal of Health Promotion
American Journal of Hypertension
American Journal of Managed Care
American Journal of Physiology
American Journal of Psychiatry
American Psychologist
Annals of Behavioral Medicine
Archives of Internal Medicine (JAMA)
Behavioral Medicine
Biological Psychology
British Journal of Educational Psychology
British Journal of Psychology
Bulletin on Narcotics
Bulletin of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors
Business and Health
Circulation
Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology
Clinical Research
Consciousness and Cognition
Frontiers in Bioscience
Criminal Justice and Behavior
Education
Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology
Energy Metabolism
European Journal of Endocrinology
European Journal of Physiology (Pflugers Archiv)
Experientia
Experiential Medicine (Erfahrungsheilkunde)
Experimental Neurology
German Journal of Clinical Psychology (Zeitschrift fur Klinische Psychologie)
German Journal of General Medicine (Zeitschrift fur Allgemeinmedizin)
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
Hormones and Behavior
Hospital and Community Psychiatry
Human Physiology
Hypertension (AHA)
Intelligence
International Congress of Internal Medicine Abstracts
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice
International Journal of Neuroscience
International Journal of Psychophysiology
International Journal of the Addictions
Japanese Journal of Industrial Health
Japanese Journal of Public Health
Journal of Adult Development
Journal of Business & Psychology
Journal of Aging and Health
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine
Journal of Applied Physiology: Respiratory, Environmental and Exercise Physiology
Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Journal of Biomedicine
Journal of Chronic Disease and Therapeutic Research
Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Journal of Clinical Psychology
Journal of Conflict Resolution
Journal of Counseling and Development
Journal of Counseling Psychology
Journal of Creative Behavior
Journal of Crime and Justice
Journal of Criminal Justice
Journal of Human Stress
Journal of Humanistic Psychology
Journal of Hypertension
Journal of Inhalation Technology
Journal of Management Education
Journal of Mind and Behavior
Journal of Moral Education
Journal of the National Medical Association
Journal of Neural Transmission
Journal of Offender Rehabilitation
Journal of Personality and Individual Differences
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
Journal of Personality Assessment
Journal of Psychology
Journal of Psychosomatic Research
Journal of Social Behavior and Personality
Journal of the American Aging Association
Journal of the Canadian Medical Association
Journal of the Israel Medical Association (Harefuah)
L'Encéphale (The Brain)
Lancet
Medizinische Klinik
Memory and Cognition
Motivation. Motor and Sensory Processes of the Brain
Netherlands Journal of Psychology (Tijdschrift voor Psychologie)
Neuroendocrinology Letters
NeuroReport
Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Perceptual and Motor Skills
Personality and Individual Differences
Physiologist, The
Physiology & Behavior
Proceedings of the Endocrine Society of Australia
Progress in Brain Research
Psychologia: International Journal of Psychology in the Orient
Psychological Reports
Psychology, Crime & Law
Psychoneuroendocrinology
Psychopathometrie
Psychophysiology
Psychosomatic Medicine
Psychotherapie-Psychosomatik Medizinische Psychologie
Respiration
Revue d'Electroencéphalographie et de Neurophysiologie Clinique
Science
Scientific American
Sleep Research
Social Indicators Research
Social Science Perspectives Journal
Society for Neuroscience Abstracts
Stroke (AHA)
Transactions of the American Society for Neurochemistry
Vestes: the Australian Universities' Review
Western Psychologist (Western Psychological Association)

"I gave my life to become the person I am right now. Was it worth it?" ~ Richard Bach

https://www.jewelryincand..._and_scene
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Reply #6 posted 07/09/12 8:32pm

prittypriss

And this (the research isn't all related to cosmic consciousness, but also related to TM and it's benefit in many areas):

Research studies on the Transcendental Meditation® technique have been published in more than 100 scientific journals. The bibliography below lists samples from each of the major categories. See also an annotated bibliography of Scientific Research on the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi Program: Collected Papers Volumes 1-6.

Brain Functioning

Travis, F., Haaga, D.H., Hagelin, J., Tanner, M., Nidich, S., Gaylord-King, C., Grosswald, S., Rainforth, M., & Schneider, R. (in press). Effects of Transcendental Meditation Practice on Brain Functioning and Stress Reactivity in College Students. International Journal of Psychophysiology.

Travis, F., Haaga, D.H., Hagelin, J., Tanner, M., Arenander, A., Nidich, S., Gaylord-King, C., Grosswald, S., Rainforth, M., & Schneider, R. (in press). A Self-Referral Default Brain State: Patterns of Coherence, Power, and eLORETA Sources during Eyes-Closed Rest and the Transcendental Meditation Practice. Cognitive Processes.

Travis, F. and S. Brown, (2009). My Brain Made Me Do It: Brain Maturation and Levels of Self-Development, in The Postconventional Personality: Perspectives on Higher Development, A.H. Pfaffenberger, P.W. Marko, and T. Greening, Editors, Sage Publishing: New York.

Travis, F.T (2006). Are All Meditations the Same? Comparison of Brain Patterns, Benefits, and Descriptions of Mindfulness Meditation, Tibetan Buddhist Meditation and Transcendental Meditation. Towards a Science of Consciousness: Abstracts, 263, p. 181.

Travis, F.T. and Arenander, A. (2006). Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Study of Effects of Transcendental Meditation Practice on Frontal Power Asymmetry and Frontal Coherence, International Journal of Neuroscience, 116(11): 1519-1538.

Hebert, R., Lehman, D., Tan, G., Travis, F., and Arenandar, A. (2005). Enhanced EEG alpha time-domain phase synchrony during Transcendental Meditation: Implications for cortical implication theory. Signal Processing, 85(11), 2213-2232.

Travis, F.T., Arenander, A., DuBois, D. (2004). Psychological and physiological characteristics of a proposed object-referral / self-referral continuum of self-awareness. Consciousness and Cognition, 13/2, 401-420.

Travis, F. Patterns of EEG coherence, power, and contingent negative variation characterize the integration of transcendental and waking states. Biological Psychology 61: 293–319, 2002.

Gallois, P. Modifications neurophysiologiques et respiratoires lors de la pratique des techniques de relaxation. L'Encéphale 10: 139–144, 1984.

Wallace, R.K. et al. Modification of the paired H reflex through the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program. Experimental Neurology 79: 77–86, 1983.

Nidich, S.I. et al. Kohlbergian cosmic perspective responses, EEG coherence, and the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program. Journal of Moral Education 12: 166–173, 1983.

Orme-Johnson, D.W. and Haynes, C.T. EEG phase coherence, pure consciousness, creativity, and TM-Sidhi experiences. International Journal of Neuroscience 13: 211–217, 1981.

Warshal, D. Effects of the Transcendental Meditation technique on normal and Jendrassik reflex time. Perceptual and Motor Skills 50: 1103–1106, 1980.

McEvoy, T.M. et al. Effects of meditation on brainstem auditory evoked potentials. International Journal of Neuroscience 10: 165–170, 1980.

Banquet, J.P. and Lesevre, N. Event-related potentials in altered states of consciousness: Motivation, motor and sensory processes of the brain. Progress in Brain Research 54: 447–453, 1980.

Bennett, J.E. and Trinder, J. Hemispheric laterality and cognitive style associated with Transcendental Meditation. Psychophysiology 14: 293–296, 1977.

Hebert, R. and D. Lehmann (1977). Theta Bursts: An EEG Pattern in Normal Subjects Practising the Transcendental Meditation Technique. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 42(3): 397-405.

Creativity / Intelligence / Learning Ability

Dixon, C., Dillbeck, M.C., Travis, F., Msemaje, H., Clayborne, B.M., Dillbeck, S.L., and Alexander, C.H. (2005). Accelerating Cognitive and Self Development: Longitudinal Studies with Preschool and Elementary School Children. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality, 17, 65-91.

So, K.T. and Orme-Johnson, D.W. Three randomized experiments on the longitudinal effects of the Transcendental Meditation technique on cognition. Intelligence 29: 419–440, 2001.

Cranson, R.W. et al. Transcendental Meditation and improved performance on intelligence-related measures: A longitudinal study. Personality and Individual Differences 12: 1105–1116, 1991.

Dixon, C.A. Consciousness and cognitive development: A six-month longitudinal study of four-year-olds practicing the children’s Transcendental Meditation technique. Dissertation Abstracts International 50(3): 1518B, 1989.

Warner, T.Q. Transcendental Meditation and developmental advancement: Mediating abilities and conservation performance. Dissertation Abstracts International 47(8): 3558B, 1987.

Jedrczak, A. et al. The TM-Sidhi programme, age, and brief test of perceptual-motor speed and nonverbal intelligence. Journal of Clinical Psychology 42: 161–164, 1986.

Dillbeck, M.C. et al. Longitudinal effects of the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program on cognitive ability and cognitive style. Perceptual and Motor Skills 62: 731–738, 1986.

Jedrczak, A. et al. The TM-Sidhi programme, pure consciousness, creativity and intelligence. The Journal of Creative Behavior 19: 270–275, 1985.

Dillbeck, M.C. Meditation and flexibility of visual perception and verbal problem-solving. Memory & Cognition 10: 207–215, 1982.

Aron, A. The Transcendental Meditation program in the college curriculum: A 4-year longitudinal study of effects on cognitive and affective functioning. College Student Journal 15: 140–146, 1981.

Dillbeck, M.C. et al. Frontal EEG coherence, H-reflex recovery, concept learning, and the TM-Sidhi program. International Journal of Neuroscience 15: 151–157, 1981.

Travis, F. The Transcendental Meditation technique and creativity: A longitudinal study of Cornell University undergraduates. Journal of Creative Behavior 13: 169–180, 1979.

Shecter, H.W. A psychological investigation into the source of the effect of the Transcendental Meditation technique. Dissertation Abstracts International 38(7): 3372B–3373B, 1978.

Tjoa, A. Increased intelligence and reduced neuroticism through the Transcendental Meditation program. Gedrag: Tijdschrift voor Psychologie 3: 167–182, 1975.

Educational Performance and Behavior

Barnes, V.A. et al. Impact of stress reduction on negative school behavior in adolescents. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 1:10, 2003.

Nidich, S.I. and Nidich, R.J. Increased academic achievement at Maharishi School of the Age of Enlightenment: A replication study. Education 109: 302–304, 1989.

Nidich, S.I. et al. School effectiveness: Achievement gains at the Maharishi School of the Age of Enlightenment. Education 107: 49–54, 1986.

Kember, P. The Transcendental Meditation technique and postgraduate academic performance. British Journal of Educational Psychology 55: 164–166, 1985.

Schecter, H.W. A psychological investigation into the source of the effect of the Transcendental Meditation technique. Dissertation Abstracts International 38(7): 3372B–3373B, 1978.

Special and Remedial Education

Wood, M.F. The effectiveness of Transcendental Meditation as a means of improving the echolalic behavior of an autistic student. Paper presented at the International Symposium on Autism Research, Boston, Massachusetts, July 1981.

Eyerman, J. Transcendental Meditation and mental retardation. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 42: 35–36, 1981McIntyre, M.E. et al. Transcendental Meditation and stuttering: A preliminary report. Perceptual and Motor Skills 39: 294 (Abstract), 1974.

Subrahmanyam, S. and Porkodi, K. Neurohumoral correlates of Transcendental Meditation. Journal of Biomedicine 1: 73–88, 1980.

Allen, C.P. Effects of Transcendental Meditation, electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback relaxation, and conventional relaxation on vasoconstriction, muscle tension, and stuttering: A quantitative comparison. Dissertation Abstracts International 40(2): 689B, 1979.

Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

Schneider, R.H. et al. A randomized controlled trial of stress reduction in the treatment of hypertension in African Americans during one year. American Journal of Hypertension, 18(1): 88–98, 2005.

Barnes, V.A. et al. Impact of Transcendental Meditation on ambulatory blood pressure in African-American adolescents. American Journal of Hypertension 17: 366–369, 2004.

Walton, K.G. et al. Psychosocial stress and cardiovascular disease, Part 2: Effectiveness of the Transcendental Meditation program in treatment and prevention. Behavioral Medicine 28: 106–123, 2002.

Schneider, R.H. et al. A randomized controlled trial of stress reduction for hypertension in older African Americans. Hypertension 26: 820–827, 1995.

Medical Care Utilization and Hospitalization

Orme-Johnson, D.W. and Herron, R.E. An innovative approach to reducing medical care utilization and expenditures. The American Journal of Managed Care 3: 135–144, 1997.

Herron, R.E. et al. The impact of the Transcendental Meditation program on government payments to physicians in Quebec. American Journal of Health Promotion 10: 208–216, 1996.

Haratani, T. and Hemmi, T. Effects of Transcendental Meditation (TM) on the health behavior of industrial workers. Japanese Journal of Public Health 37 (10 Suppl.): 729, 1990.

Haratani, T. and Hemmi, T. Effects of Transcendental Meditation (TM) on the mental health of industrial workers. Japanese Journal of Industrial Health 32: 656, 1990.

Orme-Johnson, D.W. Medical care utilization and the Transcendental Meditation program. Psychosomatic Medicine 49: 493–507, 1987.

Anxiety and Stress

Alexander, C.N. et al. Effects of the Transcendental Meditation program on stress reduction, health, and employee development: A prospective study in two occupational settings. Anxiety, Stress and Coping: An International Journal 6: 245–262, 1993.

Gaylord, C. et al. The effects of the Transcendental Meditation technique and progressive muscle relaxation on EEG coherence, stress reactivity, and mental health in black adults. International Journal of Neuroscience 46: 77–86, 1989.

Eppley, K.R. et al. Differential effects of relaxation techniques on trait anxiety: A meta-analysis. Journal of Clinical Psychology 45: 957–974, 1989.

Brooks, J.S. and Scarano, T. Transcendental Meditation in the treatment of post-Vietnam adjustment. Journal of Counseling and Development 64: 212–215, 1985.

Dillbeck, M.C. The effect of the Transcendental Meditation technique on anxiety level. Journal of Clinical Psychology 33: 1076–1078, 1977.

Candelent, T. and Candelent, G. Teaching Transcendental Meditation in a psychiatric setting. Hospital & Community Psychiatry 26: 156–159, 1975.

Orme-Johnson, D.W. Autonomic stability and Transcendental Meditation. Psychosomatic Medicine 35: 341–349, 1973.

Aging and Longevity

Schneider, R.H. et al. Long-term effects of stress reduction on mortality in persons > 55 years of age with systemic hypertension. American Journal of Cardiology 95: 1060-1064, 2005.

Alexander, C.N. et al. Transcendental Meditation, mindfulness, and longevity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 57: 950–964, 1989.

Wallace, R.K. et al. The effects of the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program on the aging process. International Journal of Neuroscience 16: 53–58, 1982.

Self-Actualization and Integration of Personality

Alexander, C.N. et al. Transcendental Meditation, self-actualization, and psychological health: A conceptual overview and statistical meta-analysis. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality 6: 189–247, 1991.

Gelderloos, P. Field independence of students at Maharishi School and a Montessori school. Perceptual and Motor Skills 65: 613–614, 1987.

Gelderloos, P. Cognitive orientation toward positive values in advanced participants of the TM and TM-Sidhi program. Perceptual and Motor Skills 64: 1003–1012, 1987.

Holt, W.R. et al. Transcendental Meditation vs. pseudo-meditation on visual choice reaction time. Perceptual and Motor Skills 46: 726, 1978.

Pelletier, K.R. Influence of Transcendental Meditation upon autokinetic perception. Perceptual and Motor Skills 39: 1031–1034, 1974.

Frew, D.R. Transcendental Meditation and productivity. Academy of Management Journal 17: 362–368, 1974.

Appelle, S. and Oswald, L.E. Simple reaction time as a function of alertness and prior mental activity. Perceptual and Motor Skills 38: 1263–1268, 1974.

Nidich, S. et al. Influence of Transcendental Meditation: A replication. Journal of Counseling Psychology 20: 565–566, 1973.

Seeman, W. et al. Influence of Transcendental Meditation on a measure of self-actualization. Journal of Counseling Psychology 19: 184–187, 1972.

Substance Abuse

Alexander, C.N. et al. Treating and preventing alcohol, nicotine, and drug abuse through Transcendental Meditation: A review and statistical meta-analysis. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly 11: 13–87, 1994.

Aron, E.N. and Aron, A. The patterns of reduction of drug and alcohol use among Transcendental Meditation participants. Bulletin of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors 2: 28–33, 1983.

Monahan, R.J. Secondary prevention of drug dependence through the Transcendental Meditation program in metropolitan Philadelphia. The International Journal of the Addictions 12: 729–754, 1977.

Shafii, M. et al. Meditation and the prevention of alcohol abuse. American Journal of Psychiatry 132: 942–945, 1975.

Shafii, M. et al. Meditation and marijuana. American Journal of Psychiatry 131: 60–63, 1974.

Wallace, R.K. et al. Decreased drug abuse with Transcendental Meditation: A study of 1,862 subjects. In Drug Abuse: Proceedings of the International Conference, ed. Chris J.D. Zarafonetis (Philadelphia: Lea and Febiger): 369–376, 1972.

Criminal Rehabilitation

Alexander, C.N. et al. Transcendental Meditation in criminal rehabilitation and crime prevention. Journal of Offender Rehabilitation 36 (1/2/3/4): 2003.

Bleick, C.R. and Abrams, A.I. The Transcendental Meditation program and criminal recidivism in California. Journal of Criminal Justice 15: 211–230, 1987.

Abrams, A.I. and Siegel, L.M. The Transcendental Meditation program and rehabilitation at Folsom State Prison: A cross-validation study. Criminal Justice and Behavior 5: 3–20, 1978.

Social and Economic Applications

Orme-Johnson, D.W., et al. Preventing terrorism and international conflict: Effects of large assemblies of participants in the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi programs. Journal of Offender Rehabilitation 36: 283–302, 2003.

Hagelin, J.S. et al. Effects of group practice of the Transcendental Meditation program on preventing violent crime in Washington, DC: Results of the National Demonstration Project, June–July 1993. Social Indicators Research 47: 153–201, 1999.

Hatchard, G.D. et al. A model for social improvement. Time series analysis of a phase transition to reduced crime in Merseyside metropolitan area. Psychology, Crime, and Law 2: 165–174, 1996.

Dillbeck, M.C. and Rainforth, M.V. Impact assessment analysis of behavioral quality of life indices: Effects of group practice of the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program. Proceedings of the Social Statistics Section of the American Statistical Association (Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association): 38–43, 1996.

Assimakis, P.D. and Dillbeck, M.C. Time series analysis of improved quality of life in Canada: Social change, collective consciousness, and the TM-Sidhi program. Psychological Reports 76: 1171–1193, 1995.

Gelderloos, P. et al. The dynamics of US–Soviet relations, 1979–1986: Effects of reducing social stress through the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program. Proceedings of the Social Statistics Section of the American Statistical Association (Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association): 297–302, 1990.

Dillbeck, M.C. Test of a field theory of consciousness and social change: Time series analysis of participation in the TM-Sidhi program and reduction of violent death in the U.S. Social Indicators Research 22: 399–418, 1990.

Davies, J.L. Alleviating political violence through enhancing coherence in collective consciousness. Dissertation Abstracts International 49(8): 2381A, 1989.

Orme-Johnson, D.W. et al. International peace project in the Middle East: The effect of the Maharishi Technology of the Unified Field. Journal of Conflict Resolution 32: 776–812, 1988.

Dillbeck, M.C. et al. Test of a field model of consciousness and social change: The Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program and decreased urban crime. The Journal of Mind and Behavior 9: 457–486, 1988

Cavanaugh, K.L. and King, K.D. Simultaneous transfer function analysis of Okun’s misery index: Improvements in the economic quality of life through Maharishi’s Vedic Science and technology of consciousness. Proceedings of the American Statistical Association, Business and Economics Statistics Section (Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association): 491–496, 1988.

Dillbeck, M.C. et al. Consciousness as a field: The Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program and changes in social indicators. The Journal of Mind and Behavior 8: 67–104, 1987.

Cavanaugh, K.L. Time series analysis of U.S. and Canadian inflation and unemployment: A test of a field-theoretic hypothesis. Proceedings of the American Statistical Association, Business and Economics Statistics Section (Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association): 799–804, 1987.

Dillbeck, M.C. et al. The Transcendental Meditation program and crime rate change in a sample of forty-eight cities. Journal of Crime and Justice

4: 25– 45, 1981.

"I gave my life to become the person I am right now. Was it worth it?" ~ Richard Bach

https://www.jewelryincand..._and_scene
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Reply #7 posted 07/10/12 8:40pm

babynoz

avatar

prittypriss said:

B1tchierThanEver said:


"The studies have been published in respected scientific journals."

I'd like to see those.

Crew, F. A. E. (1936, pp. 61-101). A repetition of McDougall’s Lamarckian experiment. The Journal of Genetics, 33.

Sheldrake, R. (1992a). An experimental test of the hypothesis of formative causation. Biology Forum, 85, 431-443.

Sheldrake, R. (1992b). Rose refuted. Biology Forum, 85, 455-460.

Radin, D. (March-May, 2003, pp. 8-13 & 44-45). For whom the bell tolls: A question of global consciousness. IONS Noetic Sciences Review.

246Nelson, R., et al. (1998). Global resonance of consciousness: Princess Diana and Mother Theresa. Electronic Journal of Parapsychology. Available: http://www.psy.uva.nl/ejap or http://www.princeton.edu/...diana.html.

Nelson, R. D. (2002). Terrorist disaster: September 11, 2001. Available: Global Consciousness Project, http://noosphere.princeton.edu.

Blasband, R. (1995, June 15-17). The ordering of random events by emotional expression. Paper presented to the 14th Annual Meeting of the Society for Scientific Exploration, Huntington Beach, CA.

Bierman, D. J. (1996). Exploring correlations between local emotional and global emotional events and the behavior of a random number generator. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 10, 363-374.

Radin, D., Rebman, J. M., & Cross, M. P. (1996). Anomalous organization of random events by group consciousness: Two exploratory experiments. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 10, 143-168.

Nelson, R. D. et al. FieldREGII: consciousness field effects: replications and explorations. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 12 (3), 425-454.

Nelson, R. (1997, July). FieldREG measurements in Egypt: resonant consciousness at sacred sites. PEAR Technical Note 97002. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, School of Engineering.

Radin, D., & Nelson, R. (1989). Evidence for consciousness-related anomalies in random physical systems. Foundations of Physics, 19 (12), 1499-1514. Other experiments regarding the effect of intention upon REGs have been conducted, such as: Peoc’h, R. (1995). Psychokinetic action of young chicks on the path of an “illuminated source”. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 9 (2), 223.

Dunne, B. J., & Jahn, R. G. (1992). Experiments in remote human/machine interaction. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 6 (4), 311-312.

Jahn, R. G., & Dunne, B. J. (1997). Correlations of random binary sequences with prestated operator intention: A review of a 12-year program. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 11, 345-367.

Sered, S. S. (January 28, 2002). Healing and religion: A Jewish perspective. The Yale Journal for Humanities in Medicine, 1-2.

Kaplan, G. A., et al. (1988). Social connections and morality from all causes and from cardiovascular disease: Perspective evidence from Eastern Finland. American Journal of Epidemiology, 128, 370-380.

Vogt, T. M., Mullooly, J. P., Ernst, D., Pope, C. R., & Hollis, J. F. (1992). Social networks as predictors of ischemic heart disease, cancer, stroke, and hypertension. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 45, 659-666.

House, J. S., Landis, K. R., & Umberson, D. (1988). Social relationships and health. Science, 241, 540-545.

Pugh, N., Walton, K. G., & Kavanaugh, K. L. (November 13-18, 1988). Can time series analysis of serotonin turnover test the theory that consciousness is a field? Paper presented at the 18th annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, Toronto, ON. Society of Neuroscience Abstracts, 14, 372.

Walton, K. G., Cavanagh, K. L., & Pugh, N. D. (In press). Effect of group practice of the Transcendental Meditation program on biochemical indicators of stress in non-meditators: Causal analysis of a field theory of consciousness. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality.

Orme-Johnson, D. W., & Walton, K. G. (1998). All approaches to preventing or reversing stress are not the same. American Journal of Health Promotion, 12, 297-299.

Jevning, R., Wallace, R., & Beidebach, M. (1992). The physiology of meditation: A review. A wakeful, hypometabolic, integrated response. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 16, 415-424.

***There are many more cited references that I can post. But perhaps this following can lead you to more citations and summary of the research.

An extensive body of research has been conducted regarding the impact of collective consciousness, via the practice of transcendental meditation by groups, upon indicators of social cohesion and health (e.g., homicides, suicides, traffic fatalities, unemployment, conflict, and quality of life). Beyond what I describe in this paper, all the research is summarized at www.mum.edu/tm_research/s...m_res.html.

*****My notes: I will state that some of the claims made by this particular school I have not researched or looked into and cannot validate whether the research has been supported by other researchers out side of this school. However, the research related to meditation and it's impact upon the community, I have read in journals by independent researchers that are not related to this school, and know they found similar findings. I also know that research has supported the impact of meditation upon an individual's well-being, reduction in anxiety, assistance in helping to decrease recidivism rates of crimes/prisoners, decreasing of the progression of some diseases, etc. This is research that I had to keep up on in my field of work when dealing with hospice patients and individuals with chronic diseases, because meditation has been found to be very effective in working with them. I have taught many patients effective meditation methods which have resulted in a decreased need for pain medications, decreased depression and anxiety, a slowing down of the disease process, etc. Even some doctors are now suggesting meditations to their patients as a way to deal with pain and other diseases.

[Edited 7/9/12 20:45pm]

I find this fascinating and I thank you for posting the info. Especially your personal observations related to your work.

Certainly more interesting than the endless circular arguments centered around religion.

"Information is abundant, but wisdom is scarce."
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Reply #8 posted 07/11/12 12:08pm

Tremolina

prittypriss said:

I found this one to be intriguing:

In 1998, Nelson began calling the machines EGGs, or ElectroGaiaGrams, and decided to enlist 40 other scientists in setting up a global network of devices. His goal was to test for something like the “noosphere”, Teilhard de Chardin’s term for a field of intelligence that he believed surrounded the earth.

Interesting

Do you believe there is such a "field" surrounding the earth pritty?

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Reply #9 posted 07/11/12 4:55pm

B1tchierThanEv
er

avatar

prittypriss said:

B1tchierThanEver said:


"The studies have been published in respected scientific journals."

I'd like to see those.

Crew, F. A. E. (1936, pp. 61-101). A repetition of McDougall’s Lamarckian experiment. The Journal of Genetics, 33.

Sheldrake, R. (1992a). An experimental test of the hypothesis of formative causation. Biology Forum, 85, 431-443.

Sheldrake, R. (1992b). Rose refuted. Biology Forum, 85, 455-460.

Radin, D. (March-May, 2003, pp. 8-13 & 44-45). For whom the bell tolls: A question of global consciousness. IONS Noetic Sciences Review.

246Nelson, R., et al. (1998). Global resonance of consciousness: Princess Diana and Mother Theresa. Electronic Journal of Parapsychology. Available: http://www.psy.uva.nl/ejap or http://www.princeton.edu/...diana.html.

Nelson, R. D. (2002). Terrorist disaster: September 11, 2001. Available: Global Consciousness Project, http://noosphere.princeton.edu.

Blasband, R. (1995, June 15-17). The ordering of random events by emotional expression. Paper presented to the 14th Annual Meeting of the Society for Scientific Exploration, Huntington Beach, CA.

Bierman, D. J. (1996). Exploring correlations between local emotional and global emotional events and the behavior of a random number generator. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 10, 363-374.

Radin, D., Rebman, J. M., & Cross, M. P. (1996). Anomalous organization of random events by group consciousness: Two exploratory experiments. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 10, 143-168.

Nelson, R. D. et al. FieldREGII: consciousness field effects: replications and explorations. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 12 (3), 425-454.

Nelson, R. (1997, July). FieldREG measurements in Egypt: resonant consciousness at sacred sites. PEAR Technical Note 97002. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, School of Engineering.

Radin, D., & Nelson, R. (1989). Evidence for consciousness-related anomalies in random physical systems. Foundations of Physics, 19 (12), 1499-1514. Other experiments regarding the effect of intention upon REGs have been conducted, such as: Peoc’h, R. (1995). Psychokinetic action of young chicks on the path of an “illuminated source”. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 9 (2), 223.

Dunne, B. J., & Jahn, R. G. (1992). Experiments in remote human/machine interaction. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 6 (4), 311-312.

Jahn, R. G., & Dunne, B. J. (1997). Correlations of random binary sequences with prestated operator intention: A review of a 12-year program. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 11, 345-367.

Sered, S. S. (January 28, 2002). Healing and religion: A Jewish perspective. The Yale Journal for Humanities in Medicine, 1-2.

Kaplan, G. A., et al. (1988). Social connections and morality from all causes and from cardiovascular disease: Perspective evidence from Eastern Finland. American Journal of Epidemiology, 128, 370-380.

Vogt, T. M., Mullooly, J. P., Ernst, D., Pope, C. R., & Hollis, J. F. (1992). Social networks as predictors of ischemic heart disease, cancer, stroke, and hypertension. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 45, 659-666.

House, J. S., Landis, K. R., & Umberson, D. (1988). Social relationships and health. Science, 241, 540-545.

Pugh, N., Walton, K. G., & Kavanaugh, K. L. (November 13-18, 1988). Can time series analysis of serotonin turnover test the theory that consciousness is a field? Paper presented at the 18th annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, Toronto, ON. Society of Neuroscience Abstracts, 14, 372.

Walton, K. G., Cavanagh, K. L., & Pugh, N. D. (In press). Effect of group practice of the Transcendental Meditation program on biochemical indicators of stress in non-meditators: Causal analysis of a field theory of consciousness. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality.

Orme-Johnson, D. W., & Walton, K. G. (1998). All approaches to preventing or reversing stress are not the same. American Journal of Health Promotion, 12, 297-299.

Jevning, R., Wallace, R., & Beidebach, M. (1992). The physiology of meditation: A review. A wakeful, hypometabolic, integrated response. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 16, 415-424.

***There are many more cited references that I can post. But perhaps this following can lead you to more citations and summary of the research.

An extensive body of research has been conducted regarding the impact of collective consciousness, via the practice of transcendental meditation by groups, upon indicators of social cohesion and health (e.g., homicides, suicides, traffic fatalities, unemployment, conflict, and quality of life). Beyond what I describe in this paper, all the research is summarized at www.mum.edu/tm_research/s...m_res.html.

*****My notes: I will state that some of the claims made by this particular school I have not researched or looked into and cannot validate whether the research has been supported by other researchers out side of this school. However, the research related to meditation and it's impact upon the community, I have read in journals by independent researchers that are not related to this school, and know they found similar findings. I also know that research has supported the impact of meditation upon an individual's well-being, reduction in anxiety, assistance in helping to decrease recidivism rates of crimes/prisoners, decreasing of the progression of some diseases, etc. This is research that I had to keep up on in my field of work when dealing with hospice patients and individuals with chronic diseases, because meditation has been found to be very effective in working with them. I have taught many patients effective meditation methods which have resulted in a decreased need for pain medications, decreased depression and anxiety, a slowing down of the disease process, etc. Even some doctors are now suggesting meditations to their patients as a way to deal with pain and other diseases.

[Edited 7/9/12 20:45pm]

The health benefits of meditation are not in question at all, and neither, by extension, are the subsequent societal influences. Calling that "cosmic consciousness," however, is a stretch, imho.

Guess I picked a bad year to quit drinking...
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Reply #10 posted 07/13/12 11:11am

Tremolina

^how so?

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Reply #11 posted 07/13/12 11:12am

Tremolina

Would Collective Consciousness be better? (it would imho.)

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Reply #12 posted 07/13/12 1:19pm

B1tchierThanEv
er

avatar

Tremolina said:

Would Collective Consciousness be better? (it would imho.)

How would you define it? That humans are conscious, and conscious of others' consciousness? I would agree with that. Anything beyond that is difficult to quantify and maybe more wishful thinking than fact.

Guess I picked a bad year to quit drinking...
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Reply #13 posted 07/17/12 1:24pm

Tremolina

B1tchierThanEver said:

Tremolina said:

Would Collective Consciousness be better? (it would imho.)

How would you define it?

Well, simply put, I would define consciousness as awareness and collective as shared.

So, collective consciousness = shared awareness.

That humans are conscious, and conscious of others' consciousness? I would agree with that. Anything beyond that is difficult to quantify and maybe more wishful thinking than fact.

How so?

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Reply #14 posted 07/22/12 4:11pm

B1tchierThanEv
er

avatar

I think we can all agree that the two words have meaning. You seem to forget the crucial part where you actually connect one to the other. Just because individuals have consciousness does not mean that they are connected in that same way. That is an extraordinary claim that requires extraordinary proof.

Guess I picked a bad year to quit drinking...
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Reply #15 posted 07/22/12 5:01pm

prittypriss

Tremolina, I don't know that I believe there is a field of intelligence surrounding the earth, but I do believe there is a level of consciousness we each can achieve that allows us to tap into a higher level of consciousness in which we all share. However, this field of intelligence that was mentioned "noosphere" could be, essentially, the Akashic Record. I would have to look into it more.

"I gave my life to become the person I am right now. Was it worth it?" ~ Richard Bach

https://www.jewelryincand..._and_scene
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Reply #16 posted 07/22/12 5:06pm

prittypriss

B1tchierThanEver said:

prittypriss said:

Crew, F. A. E. (1936, pp. 61-101). A repetition of McDougall’s Lamarckian experiment. The Journal of Genetics, 33.

Sheldrake, R. (1992a). An experimental test of the hypothesis of formative causation. Biology Forum, 85, 431-443.

Sheldrake, R. (1992b). Rose refuted. Biology Forum, 85, 455-460.

Radin, D. (March-May, 2003, pp. 8-13 & 44-45). For whom the bell tolls: A question of global consciousness. IONS Noetic Sciences Review.

246Nelson, R., et al. (1998). Global resonance of consciousness: Princess Diana and Mother Theresa. Electronic Journal of Parapsychology. Available: http://www.psy.uva.nl/ejap or http://www.princeton.edu/...diana.html.

Nelson, R. D. (2002). Terrorist disaster: September 11, 2001. Available: Global Consciousness Project, http://noosphere.princeton.edu.

Blasband, R. (1995, June 15-17). The ordering of random events by emotional expression. Paper presented to the 14th Annual Meeting of the Society for Scientific Exploration, Huntington Beach, CA.

Bierman, D. J. (1996). Exploring correlations between local emotional and global emotional events and the behavior of a random number generator. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 10, 363-374.

Radin, D., Rebman, J. M., & Cross, M. P. (1996). Anomalous organization of random events by group consciousness: Two exploratory experiments. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 10, 143-168.

Nelson, R. D. et al. FieldREGII: consciousness field effects: replications and explorations. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 12 (3), 425-454.

Nelson, R. (1997, July). FieldREG measurements in Egypt: resonant consciousness at sacred sites. PEAR Technical Note 97002. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, School of Engineering.

Radin, D., & Nelson, R. (1989). Evidence for consciousness-related anomalies in random physical systems. Foundations of Physics, 19 (12), 1499-1514. Other experiments regarding the effect of intention upon REGs have been conducted, such as: Peoc’h, R. (1995). Psychokinetic action of young chicks on the path of an “illuminated source”. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 9 (2), 223.

Dunne, B. J., & Jahn, R. G. (1992). Experiments in remote human/machine interaction. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 6 (4), 311-312.

Jahn, R. G., & Dunne, B. J. (1997). Correlations of random binary sequences with prestated operator intention: A review of a 12-year program. Journal of Scientific Exploration, 11, 345-367.

Sered, S. S. (January 28, 2002). Healing and religion: A Jewish perspective. The Yale Journal for Humanities in Medicine, 1-2.

Kaplan, G. A., et al. (1988). Social connections and morality from all causes and from cardiovascular disease: Perspective evidence from Eastern Finland. American Journal of Epidemiology, 128, 370-380.

Vogt, T. M., Mullooly, J. P., Ernst, D., Pope, C. R., & Hollis, J. F. (1992). Social networks as predictors of ischemic heart disease, cancer, stroke, and hypertension. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 45, 659-666.

House, J. S., Landis, K. R., & Umberson, D. (1988). Social relationships and health. Science, 241, 540-545.

Pugh, N., Walton, K. G., & Kavanaugh, K. L. (November 13-18, 1988). Can time series analysis of serotonin turnover test the theory that consciousness is a field? Paper presented at the 18th annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, Toronto, ON. Society of Neuroscience Abstracts, 14, 372.

Walton, K. G., Cavanagh, K. L., & Pugh, N. D. (In press). Effect of group practice of the Transcendental Meditation program on biochemical indicators of stress in non-meditators: Causal analysis of a field theory of consciousness. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality.

Orme-Johnson, D. W., & Walton, K. G. (1998). All approaches to preventing or reversing stress are not the same. American Journal of Health Promotion, 12, 297-299.

Jevning, R., Wallace, R., & Beidebach, M. (1992). The physiology of meditation: A review. A wakeful, hypometabolic, integrated response. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 16, 415-424.

***There are many more cited references that I can post. But perhaps this following can lead you to more citations and summary of the research.

An extensive body of research has been conducted regarding the impact of collective consciousness, via the practice of transcendental meditation by groups, upon indicators of social cohesion and health (e.g., homicides, suicides, traffic fatalities, unemployment, conflict, and quality of life). Beyond what I describe in this paper, all the research is summarized at www.mum.edu/tm_research/s...m_res.html.

*****My notes: I will state that some of the claims made by this particular school I have not researched or looked into and cannot validate whether the research has been supported by other researchers out side of this school. However, the research related to meditation and it's impact upon the community, I have read in journals by independent researchers that are not related to this school, and know they found similar findings. I also know that research has supported the impact of meditation upon an individual's well-being, reduction in anxiety, assistance in helping to decrease recidivism rates of crimes/prisoners, decreasing of the progression of some diseases, etc. This is research that I had to keep up on in my field of work when dealing with hospice patients and individuals with chronic diseases, because meditation has been found to be very effective in working with them. I have taught many patients effective meditation methods which have resulted in a decreased need for pain medications, decreased depression and anxiety, a slowing down of the disease process, etc. Even some doctors are now suggesting meditations to their patients as a way to deal with pain and other diseases.

[Edited 7/9/12 20:45pm]

The health benefits of meditation are not in question at all, and neither, by extension, are the subsequent societal influences. Calling that "cosmic consciousness," however, is a stretch, imho.

Let me ask this, how can meditation have a societal influence if it is only a group of people doing it? If there is no consciousness in which we are all tapped into, the meditation would only effect those that are meditating. In order for there to be a societal influence, for people to tap into a higher level of consciousness and have that have a greater impact upon local communities, would, imo, argue for that higher level of consciousness being a connection between all people. If we are not all tapped into this level of consciousness, then what one person does within meditation, would not effect the many.

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Reply #17 posted 07/22/12 5:09pm

prittypriss

B1tchierThanEver said:

I think we can all agree that the two words have meaning. You seem to forget the crucial part where you actually connect one to the other. Just because individuals have consciousness does not mean that they are connected in that same way. That is an extraordinary claim that requires extraordinary proof.

If they are not connected in the same way, then what one does within their own consciousness (meditation) would have absolutely no effect on others. Research shows that is not the case, that what one does within their own consciousness can have a profound effect upon others. Why is it that even when research is shown that supports a hypothesis that goes against what they believe, it is still called into question, unless that research supports the hypothesis someone wants it to support?

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Reply #18 posted 07/23/12 12:29am

toejam

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Let's start from the beginning, Pritty...

What is the "1993 study that found that, when 4,000 people meditated together, violent crime in Washington, D.C., declined 23% over the course of the experiment, in contrast to its rising in the months before and after"?

Who did the study? Where was it published. Was it peer-reviewed? etc. Let's start from there. One at a time.

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Reply #19 posted 07/23/12 3:15pm

Tremolina

B1tchierThanEver said:

I think we can all agree that the two words have meaning. You seem to forget the crucial part where you actually connect one to the other. Just because individuals have consciousness does not mean that they are connected in that same way. That is an extraordinary claim that requires extraordinary proof.

Wait, you asked me for a definition, I provided you with one, in simple terms. You didn't ask me for an explanation, let alone "proof".

When you react like that, it leaves the impression that you have made your mind up already, that a shared awareness is not possible, or not likely the least.

Despite of what pritty already posted on the scientific research that has been done in the field of meditation.

And despite the fact that a shared awareness could refer to something very mundane as well.

You require "extraordinary proof", but for all I care, it doesn't HAVE to mean something "spiritual" or "higher" or whatever than whatever we ALL are aware of. It COULD be, but it sure doesn't have to, imhv.

If you are not open to exploring ideas on this front and debating them with an open mind, that's cool. I would appreciate it tho' if you would then just tell me so.

And if I am mistaken on your intent, then please accept my apologies. It is just the impression I am getting from your posts...

[Edited 7/23/12 15:24pm]

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Reply #20 posted 07/23/12 3:18pm

Tremolina

prittypriss said:

Tremolina, I don't know that I believe there is a field of intelligence surrounding the earth, but I do believe there is a level of consciousness we each can achieve that allows us to tap into a higher level of consciousness in which we all share. However, this field of intelligence that was mentioned "noosphere" could be, essentially, the Akashic Record. I would have to look into it more.

Thanks for your answer pritty. It's a fascinating subject you raised, imho.

another Q: On what do you base the "higher" in your argument?

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Reply #21 posted 07/23/12 4:57pm

prittypriss

toejam said:

Let's start from the beginning, Pritty...

What is the "1993 study that found that, when 4,000 people meditated together, violent crime in Washington, D.C., declined 23% over the course of the experiment, in contrast to its rising in the months before and after"?

Who did the study? Where was it published. Was it peer-reviewed? etc. Let's start from there. One at a time.

I've posted numerous sources on the various research. The one you have questioned:

Hagelin, J.S. et al. Effects of group practice of the Transcendental Meditation program on preventing violent crime in Washington, DC: Results of the National Demonstration Project, June–July 1993. Social Indicators Research 47: 153–201, 1999.

As for whether it was peer-reviewed, I don't know. But here are some related publications in which the research was at the very least used as a resource for other research or cited in other research papers:

Reduced Crime

Hagelin J.S., et al. Effects of group practice of the Transcendental Meditation program on preventing violent crime in Washington, DC: Results of the National Demonstration Project, June-July 1993. Social Indicators Research 47: 153-201, 1999.

Hatchard G.D., et al. A model for social improvement. Time series analysis of a phase transition to reduced crime in Merseyside metropolitan area. Psychology, Crime, and Law 2: 165-174, 1996.

Dillbeck M. C., et al. Consciousness as a field: The Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program and changes in social indicators. The Journal of Mind and Behavior 8(1):67–104, 1987.

Dillbeck M.C., et al. Test of a field model of consciousness and social change: The Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program and decreased urban crime. The Journal of Mind and Behavior 9: 457-486, 1988.

Dillbeck M.C., et al. The Transcendental Meditation program and crime rate change in a sample of forty-eight cities. Journal of Crime and Justice 4: 25-45, 1981.

Reduced Conflict

Davies J. L. and Alexander C. N.. Alleviating political violence through reducing collective tension: Impact Assessment analysis of the Lebanon war. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality, 17: 285-338, 2005.

Dillbeck M.C. Test of a field theory of consciousness and social change: Time series analysis of participation in the TM-Sidhi program and reduction of violent death in the U.S. Social Indicators Research 22: 399-418, 1990.

Gelderloos P., et al. Creating world peace through the collective practice of the Maharishi Technology of the Unified Field: Improved U.S.-Soviet relations. Social Science Perspectives Journal, 2(4): 80–94, 1988.

Gelderloos P., et al. The dynamics of US–Soviet relations, 1979–1986: Effects of reducing social stress through the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program. Proceedings of the Social Statistics Section of the American Statistical Association (Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association): 297-302, 1990.

Orme-Johnson D.W., et al. Preventing terrorism and international conflict: Effects of large assemblies of participants in the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi programs. Journal of Offender Rehabilitation 36: 283-302, 2003.

Orme-Johnson D.W., et al. International peace project in the Middle East: The effect of the Maharishi Technology of the Unified Field. Journal of Conflict Resolution 32: 776-812, 1988.

Orme-Johnson D. W., et al. The effects of the Maharishi Technology of the Unified Field: Reply to a methodological critique. Journal of Conflict Resolution 34:756–768, 1990.

Improved Economics, Social Trends and Quality of Life

Assimakis P.D. and Dillbeck M.C. Time series analysis of improved quality of life in Canada: Social change, collective consciousness, and the TM-Sidhi program. Psychological Reports 76: 1171-1193, 1995.

Cavanaugh K.L. and King K.D. Simultaneous transfer function analysis of Okun's misery index: Improvements in the economic quality of life through Maharishi’s Vedic Science and technology of consciousness. Proceedings of the American Statistical Association, Business and Economics Statistics Section (Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association): 491-496, 1988.

Cavanaugh K. L., et al. A multiple-input transfer function model of Okun’s misery index: An empirical test of the Maharishi Effect. Proceedings of the American Statistical Association, Business and Economics Statistics Section, 565-570, 1989:

Cavanaugh K. L., et al. Consciousness and the quality of economic life: empirical research on the macroeconomic effects of the collective practice of Maharishi’s Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program. Proceedings of the Midwest Management Society (Chicago, IL: Midwest Management Society) 183-190, 1989.

Cavanaugh K.L., et al. Time series analysis of U.S. and Canadian inflation and unemployment: A test of a field-theoretic hypothesis. Proceedings of the American Statistical Association, Business and Economics Statistics Section (Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association): 799-804, 1987.

Dillbeck M.C. and Rainforth, M.V. Impact assessment analysis of behavioral quality of life indices: Effects of group practice of the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program. Proceedings of the Social Statistics Section of the American Statistical Association (Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association): 38-43, 1996.

Dillbeck M.C., et al. Consciousness as a field: The Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi program and changes in social indicators. The Journal of Mind and Behavior 8: 67-104, 1987.

Orme-Johnson D. W. and P. Gelderloos. The long-term effects of the Maharishi Technology of the Unified Field on the quality of life in the United States (1960 to 1983). Social Science Perspectives Journal 2(4):127-146, 1988.

"I gave my life to become the person I am right now. Was it worth it?" ~ Richard Bach

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Reply #22 posted 07/23/12 5:15pm

prittypriss

Tremolina said:

prittypriss said:

Tremolina, I don't know that I believe there is a field of intelligence surrounding the earth, but I do believe there is a level of consciousness we each can achieve that allows us to tap into a higher level of consciousness in which we all share. However, this field of intelligence that was mentioned "noosphere" could be, essentially, the Akashic Record. I would have to look into it more.

Thanks for your answer pritty. It's a fascinating subject you raised, imho.

another Q: On what do you base the "higher" in your argument?

I base it upon a level of consciousness that we cannot normally access through "thinking" or trying to access it. I say a "higher level of consciousness" merely because it is not our normal, everyday consciousness. In meditation, one gets to a point of "non-thinking", loss of the sense of self, a sense of oneness with the universe, and it's when we lose the sense of self, that we are able to access that level of consciousness. My theory as to why we access it only when we lose that sense of self is that in our normal consciousness, we have an identity that we believe is separate from everyone else. It is our little "i" or our ego. Once we lose that sense of self, that identity of self, "ego death", we are then able to access Cosmic Consciousness, or a global consciousness, that supersedes the little "i" and becomes the big "I" (oneness with all there is). Our normal, every day consciousness believes we are separate from everything we see, experience, perceive. Therefore it cannot access or recognize a higher level of consciousness, in which we are one with everything. In Zen Buddhism, they have a saying which explains the oneness (essentially) as "Tat Vam Asi" (that thou art, or you are it). For some, we define this consciousness as the Divine Consciousness or, to put it in terms that most people are able to understand in a way that makes sense to them, "God". It is merely a way to explain the depth, beauty, and total connection that comes with that experience, and in fact, many people that have experienced the Cosmic Consciousness do often refer to that consciousness, to that experience, as experiencing God or experiencing the Divine, because no other words can truly do it justice.

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Reply #23 posted 07/24/12 2:40am

toejam

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prittypriss said:

I've posted numerous sources on the various research. The one you have questioned:

Hagelin, J.S. et al. Effects of group practice of the Transcendental Meditation program on preventing violent crime in Washington, DC: Results of the National Demonstration Project, June–July 1993. Social Indicators Research 47: 153–201, 1999.

As for whether it was peer-reviewed, I don't know.


I was hoping to read the paper, but the only place I could find it wanted £35 for it, so so much for that idea!

But from what I have looked into, there's still too many questions for my liking...

I notice that Hagelin was awarded an 'Ig Nobel Prize' for this study - a mock/satirical award for "questionable" research papers (the scientific equivalent of 'The Razzies'). He's also been highly criticised for his research methods and conclusions by a wide variety of his former peers and external observers (briefly summarised here). I also find it somewhat suspicious that Hagelin also just happens to be the founder of the 'Natural Law' political party, and
'Director of the Institute of Science, Technology and Public Policy' at Maharishi University of Management (a University which itself has a reputation for being somewhat cult-ish). The phrase "vested interest" springs to mind.

So for me, if this study really is as valid as you claim (a study that also wasn't published for a questionable 6 years after its testing period), then perhaps Hagelin should do the tests again, only this time under the scrutiny of a larger, more reputationally valid university. Because if these "results" really are consistently repeatable, then it would warrant a real Nobel Prize (and not one of those mock ones lol). The Transcendental Method would also become the staple of all political movements around the globe! The fact that it's not, even after almost 20yrs, is rather telling I think. I mean, if you're a politician or police chief, then what better way to get recognition than by reducing the violent crime rate by 23%!!

So sorry Pritty, not convinced by this one.


So what's next?
What about the 1983 Israeli study that showed when "on days when a TM-Sidhi group equaling the square root of 1% of the surrounding population meditated, independently published data showed that war-related deaths in Lebanon dropped 76%"?

Who did the study? Where was it published. Was it peer-reviewed? etc.

Toejam @ Peach & Black Podcast: http://peachandblack.podbean.com
Toejam's band "Cheap Fakes": http://cheapfakes.com.au, http://www.facebook.com/cheapfakes
Toejam the solo artist: http://www.youtube.com/scottbignell
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Reply #24 posted 07/24/12 2:53am

B1tchierThanEv
er

avatar

Tremolina said:

B1tchierThanEver said:

I think we can all agree that the two words have meaning. You seem to forget the crucial part where you actually connect one to the other. Just because individuals have consciousness does not mean that they are connected in that same way. That is an extraordinary claim that requires extraordinary proof.

Wait, you asked me for a definition, I provided you with one, in simple terms. You didn't ask me for an explanation, let alone "proof".

When you react like that, it leaves the impression that you have made your mind up already, that a shared awareness is not possible, or not likely the least.

Despite of what pritty already posted on the scientific research that has been done in the field of meditation.

And despite the fact that a shared awareness could refer to something very mundane as well.

You require "extraordinary proof", but for all I care, it doesn't HAVE to mean something "spiritual" or "higher" or whatever than whatever we ALL are aware of. It COULD be, but it sure doesn't have to, imhv.

If you are not open to exploring ideas on this front and debating them with an open mind, that's cool. I would appreciate it tho' if you would then just tell me so.

And if I am mistaken on your intent, then please accept my apologies. It is just the impression I am getting from your posts...

[Edited 7/23/12 15:24pm]

As I mentioned earlier, the benefits of meditation, even in a societal context, have been well researched and proven. I completely agree with that. The concept of a "cosmic consciousness" however, is a philosophical or spiritual construct, and has not been proven in any way. Therefore, it's only reasonable to be skeptical about it. The mind is not a depository for all sorts of ideas that haven't been substantiated - critical thinking is vital.

Guess I picked a bad year to quit drinking...
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Reply #25 posted 07/24/12 2:58am

B1tchierThanEv
er

avatar

toejam said:

prittypriss said:

I've posted numerous sources on the various research. The one you have questioned:

Hagelin, J.S. et al. Effects of group practice of the Transcendental Meditation program on preventing violent crime in Washington, DC: Results of the National Demonstration Project, June–July 1993. Social Indicators Research 47: 153–201, 1999.

As for whether it was peer-reviewed, I don't know.


I was hoping to read the paper, but the only place I could find it wanted £35 for it, so so much for that idea!

But from what I have looked into, there's still too many questions for my liking...

I notice that Hagelin was awarded an 'Ig Nobel Prize' for this study - a mock/satirical award for "questionable" research papers (the scientific equivalent of 'The Razzies'). He's also been highly criticised for his research methods and conclusions by a wide variety of his former peers and external observers (briefly summarised here). I also find it somewhat suspicious that Hagelin also just happens to be the founder of the 'Natural Law' political party, and
'Director of the Institute of Science, Technology and Public Policy' at Maharishi University of Management (a University which itself has a reputation for being somewhat cult-ish). The phrase "vested interest" springs to mind.

So for me, if this study really is as valid as you claim (a study that also wasn't published for a questionable 6 years after its testing period), then perhaps Hagelin should do the tests again, only this time under the scrutiny of a larger, more reputationally valid university. Because if these "results" really are consistently repeatable, then it would warrant a real Nobel Prize (and not one of those mock ones lol). The Transcendental Method would also become the staple of all political movements around the globe! The fact that it's not, even after almost 20yrs, is rather telling I think. I mean, if you're a politician or police chief, then what better way to get recognition than by reducing the violent crime rate by 23%!!

So sorry Pritty, not convinced by this one.


So what's next?
What about the 1983 Israeli study that showed when "on days when a TM-Sidhi group equaling the square root of 1% of the surrounding population meditated, independently published data showed that war-related deaths in Lebanon dropped 76%"?

Who did the study? Where was it published. Was it peer-reviewed? etc.

Thank you, Toejam - very enlightening, if I may use the term.

Guess I picked a bad year to quit drinking...
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Reply #26 posted 07/24/12 3:29am

toejam

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^No worries. Cheers. And back at you:

B1tchierThanEver said:

As I mentioned earlier, the benefits of meditation, even in a societal context, have been well researched and proven. I completely agree with that. The concept of a "cosmic consciousness" however, is a philosophical or spiritual construct, and has not been proven in any way. Therefore, it's only reasonable to be skeptical about it. The mind is not a depository for all sorts of ideas that haven't been substantiated - critical thinking is vital.

I agree 100%

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Reply #27 posted 07/24/12 8:41am

duccichucka

toejam said:

^No worries. Cheers. And back at you:

B1tchierThanEver said:

As I mentioned earlier, the benefits of meditation, even in a societal context, have been well researched and proven. I completely agree with that. The concept of a "cosmic consciousness" however, is a philosophical or spiritual construct, and has not been proven in any way. Therefore, it's only reasonable to be skeptical about it. The mind is not a depository for all sorts of ideas that haven't been substantiated - critical thinking is vital.

I agree 100%

I don't agree at all.

The mind is a depository for all sorts of ideas that haven't been substantiated.

Love is not empirical. Friendship is not empirical. Isn't there a part of the

brain thas recently been found to influence morality as well? Yet morality

isn't empirical as well.

It is perfectly fine to be leery about positing as a matter of fact an idea/fact

like "consciousness." But we posit other shit that is just as similar as con-

sciousness is and we permit their warranted status in our language everyday.

Critical thinking is definitely important. But if all we ever spoke about were facts

and things that could be substantiated (nothing can ever fully be explained or

reduced to what is first), our lives would be pretty fucking boring and without any

type of subjectivity.

Hell, who and what is I? How do you substantiate what I is? And let's not get in

to the Descartes circularity argument.

An honest religious thinker is like a tightrope walker. He almost looks as though he were walking on nothing but air. His support is the slenderest imaginable. And yet it really is possible to walk on it.

~Wittgenstein
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Reply #28 posted 07/24/12 3:28pm

B1tchierThanEv
er

avatar

duccichucka said:

toejam said:

^No worries. Cheers. And back at you:

I agree 100%

I don't agree at all.

The mind is a depository for all sorts of ideas that haven't been substantiated.

Love is not empirical. Friendship is not empirical. Isn't there a part of the

brain thas recently been found to influence morality as well? Yet morality

isn't empirical as well.

It is perfectly fine to be leery about positing as a matter of fact an idea/fact

like "consciousness." But we posit other shit that is just as similar as con-

sciousness is and we permit their warranted status in our language everyday.

Critical thinking is definitely important. But if all we ever spoke about were facts

and things that could be substantiated (nothing can ever fully be explained or

reduced to what is first), our lives would be pretty fucking boring and without any

type of subjectivity.

Hell, who and what is I? How do you substantiate what I is? And let's not get in

to the Descartes circularity argument.

Sure, we are all selective about what concepts we accept as valid. But when researchers prove that parts of the brain are resposible for certain actions, we are a good bit farther along the way of explaining a concept like morality. We are not any closer to finding out about cosmic consciousness if it's based on shady and biased reporting. Scientific proof is important, and where we don't have it, we need to tread lightly when making extraordiary claims, and expect to be challenged about it.

Guess I picked a bad year to quit drinking...
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Reply #29 posted 07/24/12 4:05pm

duccichucka

B1tchierThanEver said:

duccichucka said:

I don't agree at all.

The mind is a depository for all sorts of ideas that haven't been substantiated.

Love is not empirical. Friendship is not empirical. Isn't there a part of the

brain thas recently been found to influence morality as well? Yet morality

isn't empirical as well.

It is perfectly fine to be leery about positing as a matter of fact an idea/fact

like "consciousness." But we posit other shit that is just as similar as con-

sciousness is and we permit their warranted status in our language everyday.

Critical thinking is definitely important. But if all we ever spoke about were facts

and things that could be substantiated (nothing can ever fully be explained or

reduced to what is first), our lives would be pretty fucking boring and without any

type of subjectivity.

Hell, who and what is I? How do you substantiate what I is? And let's not get in

to the Descartes circularity argument.

Sure, we are all selective about what concepts we accept as valid. But when researchers prove that parts of the brain are resposible for certain actions, we are a good bit farther along the way of explaining a concept like morality. We are not any closer to finding out about cosmic consciousness if it's based on shady and biased reporting. Scientific proof is important, and where we don't have it, we need to tread lightly when making extraordiary claims, and expect to be challenged about it.

I'm not sure I follow your argument. And perhaps we're saying the same thing? I dunno

but here's where I stand:

There is no difference between positing morality, love, a soul, a conscious, an I

or a cosmic consciousness in my opinion. All are abstracts/ideas, not objects

capable of scientific investigation. Yes, we can study the effects of believing in these

things in the brain, but where is morality at in nature? Nowhere. The brain doesn't

have a portion of it that determines what is morality; the brain has a portion of it

that is affected by the supposition and belief in the person who is doing the conceiving's

brain!

Can you elaborate more on your post?

An honest religious thinker is like a tightrope walker. He almost looks as though he were walking on nothing but air. His support is the slenderest imaginable. And yet it really is possible to walk on it.

~Wittgenstein
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