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Forums > Politics & Religion > Black history month!
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Thread started 02/01/12 8:59am

smoothcriminal12

Black history month!

Why is there no thread on this?

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #1 posted 02/01/12 11:02am

PANDURITO

Nine hours into the month and still no thread? Why? bawl

Reply #2 posted 02/01/12 2:27pm

luv4u

Moderator

moderator

Saw this thread. Making it a sticky cool

Edmonton, AB - canada

"hush nubbits" !
REAL MUSIC by REAL MUSICIANS - Prince
"I kind of wish there was a reason for Prince to make the site crash more" ~~ Ben
Reply #3 posted 02/01/12 2:42pm

smoothcriminal12

luv4u said:

Saw this thread. Making it a sticky cool

woot! My first sticky!

Another historical piece.

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #4 posted 02/01/12 4:37pm

luv4u

Moderator

moderator

Dunno if this fits on this thread but I just came across this ........

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/...53952.html

Edmonton, AB - canada

"hush nubbits" !
REAL MUSIC by REAL MUSICIANS - Prince
"I kind of wish there was a reason for Prince to make the site crash more" ~~ Ben
Reply #5 posted 02/01/12 5:22pm

SavonOsco

luv4u said:

Dunno if this fits on this thread but I just came across this .....


 


http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/letter-freed-slave-former-master-draw-attention-151653952.html



That was an amazing read...that should be a separate thread of it's own...
Reply #6 posted 02/01/12 5:28pm

SavonOsco

PANDURITO said:

Nine hours into the month and still no thread?  Why? bawl



Aww Pandy, sarcasm?...not here...not now...Smh...
Reply #7 posted 02/01/12 5:54pm

NastradumasKid

PANDURITO said:

Nine hours into the month and still no thread? Why? bawl

Really Pandurito, really? confused confused I be wondering about you sometimes.

Reply #8 posted 02/01/12 6:39pm

smoothcriminal12

luv4u said:

Dunno if this fits on this thread but I just came across this ........

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/...53952.html

This is great.

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #9 posted 02/01/12 7:30pm

babynoz

luv4u said:

Dunno if this fits on this thread but I just came across this ........

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/...53952.html

Thanks Luv.

"Success has a great tendency to conceal and throw a veil over the evil of men"....Demosthenes
Reply #10 posted 02/02/12 2:36am

noimageatall

Amazing that as far as we've progressed there are still 'firsts' to achieve... neutral

But I congratulate him! clapping

January 27, 2012

United Airlines Names First African American Region Chief Pilot

by Alexis Taylor
Special to the AFRO

Captain James Simons, Jr. was named United Airlines’ first African-American region chief pilot for United Airlines Jan. 20, and will lead the Northeastern Region of the world’s largest airline company.

Simons, a United pilot for 22 years, will oversee 1,450 pilots flying for the airline. Beginning in 2007, he served as assistant chief pilot for the Northeast Region, based at Dulles International Airport in northern Virginia. The region is one of the airline’s five U.S. divisions, each overseen by a chief pilot.

A member of the Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals (OBAP), a non-profit founded in 1976 to advance and support minority participation in aviation, Simons also serves on the Governance and Board Development Committee for the organization.

“I appreciate OBAP,” Simons said in a press release. “And I want to get more African Americans into management.”

Simons is a 1978 graduate of the United States Air Force Academy, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in international affairs. In the Air Force, Simons worked as an instructor pilot and was responsible for pilot evaluations in the Combat Training School.

Simons joined United in 1989, and credited all the Black pilots who came before him for making his success possible. Captain Louis Freeman, the first African American pilot to be hired by a major American carrier, began working for Southwest Airlines in 1980, eventually becoming the first Black chief pilot in the country with the same company in 1992. Simons also credited Captain Bill Norwood, who was the first African-American captain to secure a position with United Airlines.

“This is a humbling experience. I learned a lot from Louis Freeman and Bill Norwood,” Simons said in a press release.

In addition to managing the pilots, Simons will also be responsible for pilot scheduling, managing and planning the use of funds not only for Dulles International Airport, but John F. Kennedy International Airport and LaGuardia Airport of New York City, Newark Liberty International Airport of New Jersey, Baltimore/Washington Thurgood Marshall Airport, and Reagan National Airport in Washington D.C.

“We are proud of Captain Simons' achievement and applaud United Airlines for its commitment to promoting minority men and women to executive positions in the aviation industry,” Cheryl Chew, Executive Director of OBAP, said in a release.

The Chicago-based United Airlines merged with Continental Airlines in 2011 and employs 86,000 men and women and operates 702 aircraft.

http://www.afro.com/secti...ryid=73876

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #11 posted 02/02/12 4:17am

noimageatall

February 01, 2012 | 1:30 PM

President Barack Obama Pays Tribute to Black Women

President Obama Issues Proclamation
Today, in honor Black History Month, President Barack Obama has issued a proclamation highlighting the importance of the month-long celebration while paying special tribute to African-American women.

The president announced that his year's theme is "Black Women in American Culture and History."

"From the literary giants who gave voice to their communities to the artists whose harmonies and brush strokes captured hardships and aspirations, African-American women have forever enriched our cultural heritage," he writes. "Today we stand on the shoulders of countless African-American women who shattered glass ceilings and advanced our common goals."

POTUS also makes special mention of the nameless African-American women who are the backbone of our communities. He says African-American women are preparing the "next generation for the world they will inherit."

"I call upon public officials, educators, librarians, and all the people of the United States to observe this month with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities," ended the proclamation.

How are you paying tribute to African American women this month?



"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #12 posted 02/02/12 4:53am

smoothcriminal12

noimageatall said:

Amazing that as far as we've progressed there are still 'firsts' to achieve... neutral

My thoughts exactly!

Look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/w...can_firsts

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #13 posted 02/02/12 6:40am

2elijah

THanks for creating this thread 'smoothcriminal'. Love it!

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #14 posted 02/02/12 6:42am

smoothcriminal12

2elijah said:

THanks for creating this thread 'smoothcriminal'. Love it!

Thank you! It's great that we have threads like this to remember and celebrate.

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #15 posted 02/02/12 7:00am

2elijah

This guy is awesome. I wish we had more educators like him so dedicated to uplifting and empowering students. Love his philosophy. He is also a CNN Education contributor to "Perry's Principles' and was featured in CNN's 'Black in America' documentary.

DR. STEVE PERRY

Visit Dr. Perry online at www.Dr-StevePerry.com and on Facebook and Twitter @DrStevePerry.

• Founder of Capitol Preparatory Magnet School
• Best Selling Author of "Man Up"
• Education Contributor on CNN

http://premierespeakers.c..._perry/bio

To read more, go to link

Steve Perry

Dr. Steve Perry’s heart pumps passion and produces positive change. His career has taken him from directing a grassroots organization in Chester, PA to a full scholarship at the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Work, back to his hometown of Middletown where he ran a homeless shelter, became a candidate for state representative and published his first of four books…then he turned 26.

Dr. Perry is in a hurry to transform the community. He was born into his family’s third generation of poverty on his mother’s 16th birth. He believes that the success of a life is determined by where you end, not where you start.

In 1998 Dr. Steve Perry founded ConnCAP, the Connecticut Collegiate Awareness Program, at Capital Community College. The program sent 100% of its low-income first generation graduates to four-year (Edited for Compliance)

[Edited 3/3/12 16:32pm]

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #16 posted 02/02/12 7:04am

2elijah

smoothcriminal12 said:

2elijah said:

THanks for creating this thread 'smoothcriminal'. Love it!

Thank you! It's great that we have threads like this to remember and celebrate.

...and also to show that one who chooses to identify as 'Black or African American' does not mean there are 'limits' to one's human capabilities, i.e., goals, dreams, achievements, etc., in this life. biggrin

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #17 posted 02/02/12 7:07am

smoothcriminal12

2elijah said:

smoothcriminal12 said:

Thank you! It's great that we have threads like this to remember and celebrate.

...and also to show that one who chooses to identify as 'Black or African American' does not mean there are 'limits' to one's human capabilities, i.e., goals, dreams, achievements, etc., in this life. biggrin

nod

Just right around where I live! woot!

Vancouver celebrates Black History Month

For the first time in its history, the City of Vancouver has officially proclaimed February as Black History Month and will partner with the celebration’s organizers to host a number of events throughout the coming weeks.

The proclamation was made by Mayor Gregor Robertson on January 31 at City Hall, at a special event hosted by park board commissioner Constance Barnes, who helped organize the month’s festivities.

“I said, ‘I don’t want to just go in and read a proclamation,’ ” said Barnes, the daughter of Emery Barnes, a B.C. NDP MLA who, in 1994, became the first black person to be elected speaker of a provincial legislature. “I want the room packed with brown faces and black faces and tan faces,” Barnes continued. “Every colour of the brown spectrum, I want in that audience. And I want energy!”

The proclamation was presented to Nalda Callendar, executive director of the National Congress of Black Women Foundation, to mark the organization’s 20th anniversary.

“The history here goes back hundreds of years,” Barnes reflected. “Rosemary Brown [B.C. NDP MLA, the first black woman elected to a Canadian legislature, in 1972] was a good family friend. Harry Jerome [1964 Olympic bronze medallist in the 100-metre sprint] used to get out and run with my dad. Ernie King, who was a great jazz artist; Willie Fleming, who played with the B.C. Lions: these are people who all brought great things to the history of Vancouver. Either sports, or music, or the arts.…Those are the kind of people that, as a child, I was around and watched contribute to the community.”

Among the events the city has partnered in this month are film screenings and performances at the Vancity Theatre. A screening of Mighty Jerome, a documentary tribute to Harry Jerome, will also be screened at a free event at the Vancouver Public Library on February 27.

Community event listings for Black History Month can also be found on the City of Vancouver website.

http://www.straight.com/article-596271/vancouver/vancouver-celebrates-black-history-month

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #18 posted 02/02/12 7:13am

2elijah

smoothcriminal12 said:

2elijah said:

...and also to show that one who chooses to identify as 'Black or African American' does not mean there are 'limits' to one's human capabilities, i.e., goals, dreams, achievements, etc., in this life. biggrin

nod

Just right around where I live! woot!

Vancouver celebrates Black History Month

For the first time in its history, the City of Vancouver has officially proclaimed February as Black History Month and will partner with the celebration’s organizers to host a number of events throughout the coming weeks.

The proclamation was made by Mayor Gregor Robertson on January 31 at City Hall, at a special event hosted by park board commissioner Constance Barnes, who helped organize the month’s festivities.

“I said, ‘I don’t want to just go in and read a proclamation,’ ” said Barnes, the daughter of Emery Barnes, a B.C. NDP MLA who, in 1994, became the first black person to be elected speaker of a provincial legislature. “I want the room packed with brown faces and black faces and tan faces,” Barnes continued. “Every colour of the brown spectrum, I want in that audience. And I want energy!”

The proclamation was presented to Nalda Callendar, executive director of the National Congress of Black Women Foundation, to mark the organization’s 20th anniversary.

“The history here goes back hundreds of years,” Barnes reflected. “Rosemary Brown [B.C. NDP MLA, the first black woman elected to a Canadian legislature, in 1972] was a good family friend. Harry Jerome [1964 Olympic bronze medallist in the 100-metre sprint] used to get out and run with my dad. Ernie King, who was a great jazz artist; Willie Fleming, who played with the B.C. Lions: these are people who all brought great things to the history of Vancouver. Either sports, or music, or the arts.…Those are the kind of people that, as a child, I was around and watched contribute to the community.”

Among the events the city has partnered in this month are film screenings and performances at the Vancity Theatre. A screening of Mighty Jerome, a documentary tribute to Harry Jerome, will also be screened at a free event at the Vancouver Public Library on February 27.

Community event listings for Black History Month can also be found on the City of Vancouver website.

http://www.straight.com/article-596271/vancouver/vancouver-celebrates-black-history-month

Cool!

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #19 posted 02/02/12 11:26am

ScarletScandal

wow. This still goes on?

Reply #20 posted 02/02/12 11:35am

smoothcriminal12

ScarletScandal said:

wow. This still goes on?

Ignoring this comment...

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #21 posted 02/02/12 10:40pm

noimageatall

http://www.washingtonpost...story.html

Don Cornelius took ‘Soul Train’ audience on a pioneering trip through black music and culture

NEW YORK — In an era when Beyonce and Jay-Z are music royalty, when Barack Obama is the nation’s chief executive, and when black stars in the cast of a TV show are commonplace, it may be hard to grasp the magnitude of what Don Cornelius created once he got his “Soul Train” rolling.

Yes, the syndicated series delivered the music of Earth Wind & Fire, the Jacksons, Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder into America’s households, infusing them with soul in weekly doses. Yes, it gave viewers groovy dances and Afro-envy, helping get them hip to a funky world that many had never experienced, or maybe even suspected.

  • ( Gus Ruelas / Associated Press ) - Los Angeles Police Department officers stand guard out front the home of Don Cornelius, 75, creator and television host of the landmark television show “Soul Train”, after he was found shot dead in his Los Angeles home on Wednesday morning in his Los Angeles home, Feb. 1, 2012. Cornelius shot himself to death Wednesday morning, at his home in Los Angeles, police said.
  • ( Chris Pizzello, File / Associated Press ) - FILE - In a Sunday, June 28, 2009 file photo, Don Cornelius is seen at the 9th Annual BET Awards, in Los Angeles. Cornelius, creator of the long-running TV dance show “Soul Train,” shot himself to death Wednesday morning, Feb. 1, 2012 at his home in Los Angeles, police said. He was 75.
  • ( John Hayes, File / Associated Press ) - FILE - In a Thursday, Feb. 27, 1997 file photo, television producer Don Cornelius holds a plaque on the Hollywood Walk of Fame after the unveiling of his star in Los Angeles. Cornelius, creator of the long-running TV dance show “Soul Train,” shot himself to death Wednesday morning, Feb. 1, 2012 at his home in Los Angeles, police said. He was 75.
  • ( / Associated Press ) - FILE - In a 1995 file photo, producer Don Cornelius celebrates his 25th season of the syndicated music show “Soul Train, in Los Angeles” Cornelius shot himself to death Wednesday morning, Feb. 1, 2012 at his home in Los Angeles, police said. He was 75.

( Gus Ruelas / Associated Press ) -

“Most of what we get credit for is people saying, ‘I learned how to dance from watching “Soul Train” back in the day,’” Cornelius told Vibe magazine in 2006. “But what I take credit for is that there were no black television commercials to speak of before ‘Soul Train.’ There were few black faces in those ads before ‘Soul Train.’

“And what I am most proud of,” he added, “is that we made television history.”

“Soul Train” (which went on for 35 seasons) didn’t make history just by influencing the music charts. It served as a pop-culture preview and barometer of fashion, hairstyles and urban patois.

By some measure, “Soul Train” was the equivalent of Dick Clark’s “American Bandstand,” although belatedly. Arriving on the wave of the Civil Rights Era, it premiered 13 years after “Bandstand” went national, then took a while longer to attract local stations to air it and advertisers to support it.

From there, it became a Saturday afternoon ritual as soul and rap artists (and white artists, too, including Elton John and David Bowie) showed off their latest releases while kids responded on the dance floor.

“When you come up with a good idea, you don’t have to do a whole lot,” Cornelius told The New York Times in 1996 in describing his show’s formula. “The idea does it for you.”

On “Soul Train” (”the hippest trip in America,” the announcer proclaimed, “across the tracks of your mind”) the host, of course, was Cornelius, but to describe him as the black Dick Clark is somewhat misleading. (A bit like calling Pat Boone the white Little Richard, as David Bianculli noted in his “Dictionary of Teleliteracy.”)

For Cornelius, the difference was in the execution, as he told The Associated Press in 1995.

“If I saw ‘American Bandstand’ and I saw dancing and I knew black kids can dance better; and I saw white artists and I knew black artists make better music; and if I saw a white host and I knew a black host could project a hipper line of speech — and I DID know all these things,” then it was reasonable to try, he said.

On his show, Cornelius was the epitome of cool, with a baritone rumble that recalled seductive soul maestro Barry White, and an unflappable manner all the way through the hour to his trademark sign-off: “We wish you love, peace, and SOUL.”

He laced his show with pro-social messages directed at his black audience.

On a 1974 program, he interviewed James Brown about the tragedy of violence in black communities (”black-on-black crime looks very bad in the sight of The Man,” Brown said sorrowfully). Then he brought on a 19-year-old Al Sharpton, already a civil rights activist, who presented Brown with an award for his music.

But Cornelius never let preaching get in the way of “Soul Train’s” hipness — or of his own.

Standing by Mary Wilson of the Supremes on another edition, he sported a slim black suit that flared into bellbottoms, a grey shirt with white polka dots, and a huge afro.

“What do you do for kicks?” he asked Wilson, who mentioned bowling as one hobby, but said how much she wanted to dance with Cornelius on “Soul Train.”

“You can dance with me,” Cornelius replied. “But not on television.”

[Edited 2/2/12 22:48pm]

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #22 posted 02/02/12 10:43pm

smoothcriminal12

noimageatall said:

http://www.washingtonpost...story.html

Don Cornelius took ‘Soul Train’ audience on a pioneering trip through black music and culture

NEW YORK — In an era when Beyonce and Jay-Z are music royalty, when Barack Obama is the nation’s chief executive, and when black stars in the cast of a TV show are commonplace, it may be hard to grasp the magnitude of what Don Cornelius created once he got his “Soul Train” rolling.

Yes, the syndicated series delivered the music of Earth Wind & Fire, the Jacksons, Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder into America’s households, infusing them with soul in weekly doses. Yes, it gave viewers groovy dances and Afro-envy, helping get them hip to a funky world that many had never experienced, or maybe even suspected.

  • ( Gus Ruelas / Associated Press ) - Los Angeles Police Department officers stand guard out front the home of Don Cornelius, 75, creator and television host of the landmark television show “Soul Train”, after he was found shot dead in his Los Angeles home on Wednesday morning in his Los Angeles home, Feb. 1, 2012. Cornelius shot himself to death Wednesday morning, at his home in Los Angeles, police said.
  • ( Chris Pizzello, File / Associated Press ) - FILE - In a Sunday, June 28, 2009 file photo, Don Cornelius is seen at the 9th Annual BET Awards, in Los Angeles. Cornelius, creator of the long-running TV dance show “Soul Train,” shot himself to death Wednesday morning, Feb. 1, 2012 at his home in Los Angeles, police said. He was 75.
  • ( John Hayes, File / Associated Press ) - FILE - In a Thursday, Feb. 27, 1997 file photo, television producer Don Cornelius holds a plaque on the Hollywood Walk of Fame after the unveiling of his star in Los Angeles. Cornelius, creator of the long-running TV dance show “Soul Train,” shot himself to death Wednesday morning, Feb. 1, 2012 at his home in Los Angeles, police said. He was 75.
  • ( / Associated Press ) - FILE - In a 1995 file photo, producer Don Cornelius celebrates his 25th season of the syndicated music show “Soul Train, in Los Angeles” Cornelius shot himself to death Wednesday morning, Feb. 1, 2012 at his home in Los Angeles, police said. He was 75.

( Gus Ruelas / Associated Press ) -

NEW YORK — In an era when Beyonce and Jay-Z are music royalty, when Barack Obama is the nation’s chief executive, and when black stars in the cast of a TV show are commonplace, it may be hard to grasp the magnitude of what Don Cornelius created once he got his “Soul Train” rolling.

Yes, the syndicated series delivered the music of Earth Wind & Fire, the Jacksons, Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder into America’s households, infusing them with soul in weekly doses. Yes, it gave viewers groovy dances and Afro-envy, helping get them hip to a funky world that many had never experienced, or maybe even suspected.

“Most of what we get credit for is people saying, ‘I learned how to dance from watching “Soul Train” back in the day,’” Cornelius told Vibe magazine in 2006. “But what I take credit for is that there were no black television commercials to speak of before ‘Soul Train.’ There were few black faces in those ads before ‘Soul Train.’

“And what I am most proud of,” he added, “is that we made television history.”

“Soul Train” (which went on for 35 seasons) didn’t make history just by influencing the music charts. It served as a pop-culture preview and barometer of fashion, hairstyles and urban patois.

By some measure, “Soul Train” was the equivalent of Dick Clark’s “American Bandstand,” although belatedly. Arriving on the wave of the Civil Rights Era, it premiered 13 years after “Bandstand” went national, then took a while longer to attract local stations to air it and advertisers to support it.

From there, it became a Saturday afternoon ritual as soul and rap artists (and white artists, too, including Elton John and David Bowie) showed off their latest releases while kids responded on the dance floor.

“When you come up with a good idea, you don’t have to do a whole lot,” Cornelius told The New York Times in 1996 in describing his show’s formula. “The idea does it for you.”

On “Soul Train” (”the hippest trip in America,” the announcer proclaimed, “across the tracks of your mind”) the host, of course, was Cornelius, but to describe him as the black Dick Clark is somewhat misleading. (A bit like calling Pat Boone the white Little Richard, as David Bianculli noted in his “Dictionary of Teleliteracy.”)

For Cornelius, the difference was in the execution, as he told The Associated Press in 1995.

“If I saw ‘American Bandstand’ and I saw dancing and I knew black kids can dance better; and I saw white artists and I knew black artists make better music; and if I saw a white host and I knew a black host could project a hipper line of speech — and I DID know all these things,” then it was reasonable to try, he said.

On his show, Cornelius was the epitome of cool, with a baritone rumble that recalled seductive soul maestro Barry White, and an unflappable manner all the way through the hour to his trademark sign-off: “We wish you love, peace, and SOUL.”

He laced his show with pro-social messages directed at his black audience.

On a 1974 program, he interviewed James Brown about the tragedy of violence in black communities (”black-on-black crime looks very bad in the sight of The Man,” Brown said sorrowfully). Then he brought on a 19-year-old Al Sharpton, already a civil rights activist, who presented Brown with an award for his music.

But Cornelius never let preaching get in the way of “Soul Train’s” hipness — or of his own.

Standing by Mary Wilson of the Supremes on another edition, he sported a slim black suit that flared into bellbottoms, a grey shirt with white polka dots, and a huge afro.

“What do you do for kicks?” he asked Wilson, who mentioned bowling as one hobby, but said how much she wanted to dance with Cornelius on “Soul Train.”

“You can dance with me,” Cornelius replied. “But not on television.”

Great article! R.I.P. Don.

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #23 posted 02/03/12 9:35am

2elijah

luv4u said:

Dunno if this fits on this thread but I just came across this ........

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/...53952.html

Thanks luv4u, that was a very, interesting read.

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #24 posted 02/03/12 12:18pm

OldFriends4Sale

moderator


"To be free -to walk the good American earth as equal citizens, to live without fear, to enjoy the fruits of our toil to give our children every opportunity in life - that dream which we have held so long in our hearts is today the destiny that we hold in our hands." - Paul Robeson

In Princeton, New Jersey on April 9, 1898, Paul Robeson was born to a former slave, the Rev. William Robeson. His mother, a teacher, died shortly thereafter when he was only five years old. Three years later, the Robeson family moved to Westfield, New Jersey. In 1910, Robeson's father became pastor of St.Thomas A.M.E. Zion Church and the Robeson family moved to Somerville, New Jersey. Paul Robeson attended Somerville High School. There, Robeson excelled in sports, drama, singing, academics, and debating. He graduated from Somerville High School in 1915.

Robeson was awarded a four year academic scholarship to Rutgers University in 1915, the third black student in the history of the institution. Robeson became a twelve letter athlete excelling in baseball, basketball, football, and track. He was named to the All American Football team on two occasions. In addition to his athletic talents, Robeson was named a Phi Beta Kappa scholar, belonged to the Cap & Skull Honor Society, and graduated valedictorian of his class in 1919.

He went on to study law at Columbia in New York and received his degree in 1923. There he met and married Eslanda Cardozo Goode, who was the first black woman to head a pathology laboratory. Robeson worked as a law clerk in New York.

Now where I come from
We don't let society tell us how it's supposed 2 be
Our clothes, our hair, we don't care
It's all about being there...
Reply #25 posted 02/03/12 12:20pm

OldFriends4Sale

moderator

Now where I come from
We don't let society tell us how it's supposed 2 be
Our clothes, our hair, we don't care
It's all about being there...
Reply #26 posted 02/03/12 8:23pm

SHOCKADELICA1

Why is it that anything and everything pertaining to "race" is put into P&R???? If that's the case, then change the name of the forum to "Race, Politics & Religion".

Ridiculous.... disbelief

"Bring friends, bring your children and bring foot spray 'cause it's gon' be funky." ~ Prince

A kiss on the lips, is betta than a knife in the back ~ Sheila E

Darkness isn't the absence of light, it's the absence of U ~ Prince
Reply #27 posted 02/04/12 5:01am

smoothcriminal12

SHOCKADELICA1 said:

Why is it that anything and everything pertaining to "race" is put into P&R???? If that's the case, then change the name of the forum to "Race, Politics & Religion".

Ridiculous.... disbelief

I put it in here in advance because anything race related is put into P&R.

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #28 posted 02/04/12 5:17am

noimageatall

smoothcriminal12 said:

SHOCKADELICA1 said:

Why is it that anything and everything pertaining to "race" is put into P&R???? If that's the case, then change the name of the forum to "Race, Politics & Religion".

Ridiculous.... disbelief

I put it in here in advance because anything race related is put into P&R.

No...that's incorrect. Anything 'Black' related gets put in P&R. confused

edited because I did notice that imago's Shit WHITE GUYS says to ASIAN GIRLS was moved here. shrug

[Edited 2/4/12 5:23am]

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #29 posted 02/04/12 5:23am

smoothcriminal12

noimageatall said:

smoothcriminal12 said:

I put it in here in advance because anything race related is put into P&R.

No...that's incorrect. Anything 'Black' related gets put in P&R. confused

Well....I'll just keep quiet on that one. lol

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #30 posted 02/05/12 5:43am

noimageatall

Black History Month 2012


For Black History Month 2012, the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education website celebrates 28 individuals. One for each day of February, the shortest month of the year.

The lives of these Americans are worthy of celebration and further study, which our short profiles hope to encourage. The women and men included are writers, editors, journalists, publishers, trailblazers and change makers. They remind us of the rich contributions African Americans make and have made in the world of words.

This is by no means a definitive or exhaustive listing. It’s a starting point for learning, comment and discussion during Black History Month - February, 2012 when our nation pays a little more attention to issues of diversity. Be heard.

Kwame Anthony Appiah

Send to friend
Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Kwame Anthony Appiah is a Ghanaian-British-American philosopher, cultural theorist, and novelist whose interests include political and moral theory, the philosophy of language and mind, and African intellectual history. Kwame Anthony Appiah grew up in Ghana and earned a Ph.D. at Cambridge University. He is currently the Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Philosophy at Princeton University.

In 2007, Appiah was a contributing scholar in the award-winning, PBS-broadcast documentary Prince Among Slaves produced by Unity Productions Foundation.

Appiah appeared alongside a number of contemporary philosophers—including Cornel West, Avital Ronell, Peter Singer, Martha Nussbaum, Michael Hardt, Slavoj Žižek, and Judith Butler—in Astra Taylor's 2008 film Examined Life where he discussed his views on cosmopolitanism.

Derrick Bell

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Thursday, February 2, 2012

Derrick Albert Bell, Jr. was the first tenured African-American professor of Law at Harvard University, and largely credited as the originator of Critical Race Theory. He was the former dean of the University of Oregon School of Law.

Bell is arguably the most influential source of thought critical of traditional civil rights discourse. Bell’s critique represented a challenge to the dominant liberal and conservative position on civil rights, race and the law. He employed three major arguments in his analyses of racial patterns in American law: constitutional contradiction, the interest convergence principle and the price of racial remedies.

Bell continued writing about critical race theory even after accepting a teaching position at Harvard University. Much of his legal scholarship was influenced by his experience both as a black man and as a civil rights attorney. Writing in a narrative style, Bell contributed to the intellectual discussions on race. According to Bell, his purpose in writing was to examine the racial issues within the context of their economic and social and political dimensions from a legal standpoint.

Cathy Cohen

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Friday, February 3, 2012

Cathy J. Cohen is an American author, feminist and social activist whose work has focused on the African American experience in politics from a perspective which is underlined by intersectionality. A former Director of the Center for the Study of Race (2002–2005), she is currently David and Mary Winton Green Professor in Political Science and the College at the University of Chicago. She received her BA from Miami University; Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1993 and began her academic career at Yale University where she received tenure. Professor Cohen joined the faculty of the University of Chicago in 2002.

As an academic activist Cohen frequently writes and speaks about gender, sexuality, class, ethnicity, and their interrelatedness, and connection to power. This approach puts her in a class of leftist intellectuals who work to have social and public policy influence the lives of marginalized groups in a positive way. Cohen, a black lesbian and a parent, is the principal researcher on the www.blackyouthproject.com , and is the author of Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the future of American politics and boundaries of Blackness: AIDS and the Breakdown of Black Politics among others.

Zachary R. Dowdy

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Saturday, February 4, 2012

Zachary R. Dowdy has been adjunct instructor in Stony Brook’s journalism program since January 2003. The 1989 graduate of Stony Brook University has worked for The Boston Herald, where he covered breaking news and The Boston Globe, where he covered urban affairs, international issues and criminal justice with an emphasis on corrections. He reported and wrote investigative series for both newspapers.

Dowdy is currently a criminal justice reporter for Newsday, where he penned a news column about criminal justice and legal issues. He also has served as Newsday’s state, national and foreign correspondent, filing stories from out-of-state, abroad or the United Nations. Dowdy has taught journalism and writing courses at both the University of Massachusetts-Boston and Roxbury Community College, in Boston. He also participated as a writing coach in Partners in Print, a journalism program for elementary, middle and high school students in Boston.

Amy DuBois Barnett

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Sunday, February 5, 2012

Amy DuBois Barnett is an award-winning print and online media executive, writer and motivator. She is the author of an empowering advice book for women, Get Yours! How To Have Everything You Ever Dreamed of and More (Doubleday/Broadway Books, 2007). Most recently, she held a position as the Deputy Editor-in-Chief of Harper’s Bazaar. Prior to Harper’s Bazaar, Barnett was the Managing Editor of Teen People, becoming the first African-American woman in the country to head a mainstream consumer magazine.

clapping

(I'll add one more for each day)

r edit

[Edited 2/5/12 5:44am]

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #31 posted 02/05/12 7:35am

smoothcriminal12

That's a great initiative. nod On Facebook, I'm posting a video about historical events in black history daily for the month of February.

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #32 posted 02/06/12 5:23am

OldFriends4Sale

moderator

SHOCKADELICA1 said:

Why is it that anything and everything pertaining to "race" is put into P&R???? If that's the case, then change the name of the forum to "Race, Politics & Religion".

Ridiculous.... disbelief

I've already posted the info. in the other threads. If you look at the description 2 Politics & Religion it says racial issue etc

I've already asked for the forum name change, but I don't think it's that serious

[Edited 2/6/12 5:45am]

Now where I come from
We don't let society tell us how it's supposed 2 be
Our clothes, our hair, we don't care
It's all about being there...
Reply #33 posted 02/06/12 6:15am

2elijah

There was a documentary on television this past weekend, narrated/hosted by Judge Joe Brown. I was amazed about the story of Cathay Williams, a female Buffalo soldier, who disguised herself as a man to join the unit. She changed her name to Williams Cathay to get in. Amazing story of these soldiers. First time I actually heard the story of them. Another interesting one is about a Buffalo Soldier named 'Flipper' who attended West Point Academy and endured the 'silent treatment' from other White students. He was not allowed to speak to them, nor were they, during his time in West Point. Healso served as a Buffalo soldier and tried to be 'equal' to his fellow White soldiers, but no matter all his accomplishments/education, he was never treated as their equal, and was set up by one of his peers, and wrongfully accused of a crime, and discharged from his service. He was never able to clear his name. His name was finally cleared sometime in 1999 I believe by President Bill Clinton.

http://www.buffalosoldier...istory.htm

[Edited 3/3/12 16:36pm]

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #34 posted 02/06/12 6:20am

2elijah

761st Tank Battalion

I am proud to say my son's paternal grandfather fought in this unit, and we often heard his stories about it during family get-togethers. I remember the stories of prejudice many of the soldiers in his unit faced, and how they were not allowed to share the same areas as the white soldiers, but the 761st Tank Battalion stood together as brothers and fought for this country despite the racial tensions they had to face from other American soldiers. 'Mac" passed away about 4 years ago. His family nickname was "Mac".

http://www.761st.com/index.php

home

The 761st Tank Battalion

The 761st Tank Battalion was activated on April 1, 1942, at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, and deployed to Europe, landing at Omaha Beach in France on October 10, 1944.

The Battalion trained at Camp Hood, Texas, where they were rated superior by Second Army Commander Lt.Gen. Ben Lear. They landed on the Continent with high morale -- some said they were cocky.

Later referred to as the Black Panther Tank Battalion, the 761st was attached to the XII Corps' 26th Infantry Division, assigned to Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s Third Army, an army already racing eastward across France, and committed to combat on Nov. 7, 1944.

As a result of their great fighting abilities they spearheaded a number of Patton's moves into enemy territory. They forced a hole in the Siegfried Line, allowing Patton's 4th Armored Division to pour through into Germany. They fought in France, Belgium, and Germany, and were among the first American forces to link up with the Soviet Army (Ukranians) at the River Steyr in Austria.

history

The history of the 761st Tank Battalion has been told a number of times, including books, starting with one titled Come Out Fighting that was written and self-published by the unit's enlisted members immediately after the end of World War II in Europe. The strength of the 761st Tank Battalion was proven during 183 days of continual fighting (including action in the Battle of the Bulge) after the Black Panthers became the first African-American armored unit to enter combat. Staff Sergeant Ruben Rivers posthumously received the Congressional Medal of Honor for his extraordinary heroism in action. Warren G. H. Crecy received a battlefield commission and a recommendation for the Medal of Honor while earning his reputation as the Baddest Man in the 761st. Baseball legend Jackie Robinson was an officer with the 761st Tank Battalion during training at Camp Hood, Texas, but he was prevented from going to Europe with his unit by a racial incident on a bus. An article in the January 1992 edition of Army magazine by Lt. Col. Philip W. Latimer describes his recollections of When the Black Panthers Prowled. Eventually, after delays caused by the deep racial prejudices of the time, the unit was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation by President Jimmy Carter. An oral history project interview with the late Staff Sergeant Floyd Dade, by The Urban School of San Francisco provides an interesting first hand account of a 761st Tanker's personal experiences. Cpl. Buddie V. Branch describes his recollections of being a 761st tanker in an interview with 761st Tank Battalion Historian Wayne D. Robinson. An article about Cpl. Raleigh Hill by Greg Bischof titled Veteran helped make history from the February 25, 2007, edition of the Texarkana Gazette is re-published here with permission (and thanks.) A January, 2009, feature story from the Southside Sentinel about Pvt. Raymond W. Burrell of Deltaville, Virginia, also is republished here by permission. An article written by Gina DiNicolo originally published in Military Officer magazine in February, 2006, is republished here by permission of the author (and with thanks to the auhtor and magazine.) Also, a feature article entitled Color Barrier Broken written by John Neville originally published in the Turret in February, 2007, is republished here by permission (with thanks to the author and the newspaper serving Fort Knox.) An article by Lt.Col. Roger Cunningham (USA-Ret.) originally published in the December 2004 issue of On Point magazine is republished here with the permission of (and with thanks to) the Army Historical Foundation.

They received a Presidential Citation signed by Former President Jimmy Carter

puc5

[Edited 2/6/12 6:28am]

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #35 posted 02/06/12 4:49pm

PANDURITO

I demand this thread to be renamed as NATIONAL AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY MONTH! stfu

Black history month! is so 2011 rolleyes

Reply #36 posted 02/06/12 5:48pm

smoothcriminal12

PANDURITO said:

I demand this thread to be renamed as NATIONAL AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY MONTH! stfu

Black history month! is so 2011 rolleyes

Oh god. lol

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #37 posted 02/06/12 5:54pm

chocolate1

PANDURITO said:

I demand this thread to be renamed as NATIONAL AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY MONTH! stfu

Black history month! is so 2011 rolleyes

neutral


"Love Hurts.
Your lies, they cut me.
Now your words don't mean a thing.
I don't give a damn if you ever loved me..."

-Cher, "Woman's World"
Reply #38 posted 02/06/12 6:57pm

noimageatall

Henry Louis Gates

Send to friend
Monday, February 6, 2012

Henry Louis Gates, Jr., is an American literary critic, educator, scholar, writer, editor, and public intellectual. He was the first African American to receive the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship. He has received numerous honorary degrees and awards for his teaching, research, and development of academic institutions to study black culture. In 2002, Gates was selected to give the Jefferson Lecture, in recognition of his "distinguished intellectual achievement in the humanities".

Gates has hosted several PBS television miniseries, including the history and travel program Wonders of the African World and the biographical African American Lives and Faces of America. Gates sits on the boards of many notable arts, cultural, and research institutions. He serves as the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor at Harvard University, where he is director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research.

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #39 posted 02/06/12 7:01pm

noimageatall

2elijah said:

There was a documentary on television this past weekend, narrated/hosted by Judge Joe Brown. I was amazed about the story of Cathay Williams, a female Buffalo soldier, who disguised herself as a man to join the unit. She changed her name to Williams Cathay to get in. Amazing story of these soldiers. First time I actually heard the story of them. Another interesting one is about a Buffalo Soldier named 'Flipper' who attended West Point Academy and endured the 'silent treatment' from other White students. He was not allowed to speak to them, nor were they, during his time in West Point. Healso served as a Buffalo soldier and tried to be 'equal' to his fellow White soldiers, but no matter all his accomplishments/education, he was never treated as their equal, and was set up by one of his peers, and wrongfully accused of a crime, and discharged from his service. He was never able to clear his name. His name was finally cleared sometime in 1999 I believe by President Bill Clinton.

9th Cavalry
Lawton-Fort Sill Chapter
10 th Cavalry

[Edited 2/6/12 6:36am]

Wow, now that took courage!!! clapping I'd like to see a movie about HER life!! Thanks 2elijah. I never heard of her.

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #40 posted 02/06/12 7:05pm

noimageatall

2elijah said:

761st Tank Battalion

I am proud to say my son's paternal grandfather fought in this unit, and we often heard his stories about it during family get-togethers. I remember the stories of prejudice many of the soldiers in his unit faced, and how they were not allowed to share the same areas as the white soldiers, but the 761st Tank Battalion stood together as brothers and fought for this country despite the racial tensions they had to face from other American soldiers. 'Mac" passed away about 4 years ago. His family nickname was "Mac".

http://www.761st.com/index.php

The 761st Tank Battalion

The 761st Tank Battalion was activated on April 1, 1942, at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, and deployed to Europe, landing at Omaha Beach in France on October 10, 1944.

The Battalion trained at Camp Hood, Texas, where they were rated superior by Second Army Commander Lt.Gen. Ben Lear. They landed on the Continent with high morale -- some said they were cocky.

Later referred to as the Black Panther Tank Battalion, the 761st was attached to the XII Corps' 26th Infantry Division, assigned to Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s Third Army, an army already racing eastward across France, and committed to combat on Nov. 7, 1944.

As a result of their great fighting abilities they spearheaded a number of Patton's moves into enemy territory. They forced a hole in the Siegfried Line, allowing Patton's 4th Armored Division to pour through into Germany. They fought in France, Belgium, and Germany, and were among the first American forces to link up with the Soviet Army (Ukranians) at the River Steyr in Austria.

They received a Presidential Citation signed by Former President Jimmy Carter

puc5

[Edited 2/6/12 6:28am]

What an honor!! I bet those were some good stories he told. Great citation for 'extraordinary heroism' by Carter.

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #41 posted 02/06/12 8:22pm

2elijah

noimageatall said:

2elijah said:

There was a documentary on television this past weekend, narrated/hosted by Judge Joe Brown. I was amazed about the story of Cathay Williams, a female Buffalo soldier, who disguised herself as a man to join the unit. She changed her name to Williams Cathay to get in. Amazing story of these soldiers. First time I actually heard the story of them. Another interesting one is about a Buffalo Soldier named 'Flipper' who attended West Point Academy and endured the 'silent treatment' from other White students. He was not allowed to speak to them, nor were they, during his time in West Point. Healso served as a Buffalo soldier and tried to be 'equal' to his fellow White soldiers, but no matter all his accomplishments/education, he was never treated as their equal, and was set up by one of his peers, and wrongfully accused of a crime, and discharged from his service. He was never able to clear his name. His name was finally cleared sometime in 1999 I believe by President Bill Clinton.

[Edited 2/6/12 6:36am]

Wow, now that took courage!!! clapping I'd like to see a movie about HER life!! Thanks 2elijah. I never heard of her.

No problem. Neither have I until I saw the story on tv this past weekend. Judge Joe Brown was the narrator of it.

[Edited 3/3/12 17:50pm]

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #42 posted 02/06/12 8:23pm

2elijah

noimageatall said:

2elijah said:

761st Tank Battalion

I am proud to say my son's paternal grandfather fought in this unit, and we often heard his stories about it during family get-togethers. I remember the stories of prejudice many of the soldiers in his unit faced, and how they were not allowed to share the same areas as the white soldiers, but the 761st Tank Battalion stood together as brothers and fought for this country despite the racial tensions they had to face from other American soldiers. 'Mac" passed away about 4 years ago. His family nickname was "Mac".

http://www.761st.com/index.php

The 761st Tank Battalion

The 761st Tank Battalion was activated on April 1, 1942, at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, and deployed to Europe, landing at Omaha Beach in France on October 10, 1944.

The Battalion trained at Camp Hood, Texas, where they were rated superior by Second Army Commander Lt.Gen. Ben Lear. They landed on the Continent with high morale -- some said they were cocky.

Later referred to as the Black Panther Tank Battalion, the 761st was attached to the XII Corps' 26th Infantry Division, assigned to Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s Third Army, an army already racing eastward across France, and committed to combat on Nov. 7, 1944.

As a result of their great fighting abilities they spearheaded a number of Patton's moves into enemy territory. They forced a hole in the Siegfried Line, allowing Patton's 4th Armored Division to pour through into Germany. They fought in France, Belgium, and Germany, and were among the first American forces to link up with the Soviet Army (Ukranians) at the River Steyr in Austria.

They received a Presidential Citation signed by Former President Jimmy Carter

puc5

[Edited 2/6/12 6:28am]

What an honor!! I bet those were some good stories he told. Great citation for 'extraordinary heroism' by Carter.

My son misses his grandpa and the stories he would tell us all.

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #43 posted 02/07/12 2:35pm

noimageatall

Patrice Elizabeth Grell Yursik

Send to friend
Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Patrice Elizabeth Grell Yursik is the creator of Afrobella.com. She created the site in 2006 to fill a void that existed in print and in the blogosphere – a continual celebration of natural hair and women all shades of beautiful. Afrobella readers are enlightening and entertaining, intelligent and glamorous, friendly, fabulous and fun.

Afrobella is dedicated to product reviews, ruminations about culture, music and style, and interviews with women all shades of beautiful.

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #44 posted 02/08/12 4:00am

noimageatall

Angelina W. Grimké

Send to friend
Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Angelina Weld Grimké was an Mixed American journalist, teacher, playwright and poet who was part of the Harlem Renaissance and was one of the first Mixed American women to have a play performed.

Grimké wrote essays, short stories and poems which were published in The Crisis, Opportunity, The New Negro, Caroling Dusk, and Negro Poets and Their Poems. Some of her more famous poems include, "The Eyes of My Regret", "At April", and "Trees". She was an active writer and activist included among the figures of the Harlem Renaissance.

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #45 posted 02/08/12 9:37am

SavonOsco

These post are great and informative....thanx "noimageatall" and I applaud your effort!!
Reply #46 posted 02/08/12 9:56pm

noimageatall

Lorraine Hansberry

Send to friend
Thursday, February 9, 2012

Lorraine Hansberry was an African American playwright and author of political speeches, letters, and essays. Her best known work, A Raisin in the Sun, was inspired by her family's battle against racial segregation in Chicago.

Hansberry contributed to the understanding of abortion, discrimination, and Africa. She joined the Daughters of Bilitis and contributed letters to their magazine, The Ladder, in 1957 that addressed feminism and homophobia.

In San Francisco, The Lorraine Hansberry Theatre, which specializes in original stagings and revivals of African-American theatre, is named in her honor. Singer and pianist Nina Simone, who was a close friend of Hansberry, used the title of her unfinished play to write a civil rights-themed song "To Be Young, Gifted and Black" together with Weldon Irvine. The single reached the top 10 of the R&B charts. A studio recording by Simone was released as a single and the first live recording on October 26, 1969 was captured on Black Gold (1970).

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #47 posted 02/08/12 9:58pm

noimageatall

SavonOsco said:

These post are great and informative....thanx "noimageatall" and I applaud your effort!!

No problem. I love learning about courageous people. reading

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #48 posted 02/08/12 11:36pm

noimageatall

The world war on democracy

19 January 2012

sad

lisette.JPG

Lisette Talate died the other day. I remember a wiry, fiercely intelligent woman who masked her grief with a determination that was a presence. She was the embodiment of people's resistance to the war on democracy. I first glimpsed her in a 1950s Colonial Office film about the Chagos islanders, a tiny creole nation living midway between Africa and Asia in the Indian Ocean. The camera panned across thriving villages, a church, a school, a hospital, set in a phenomenon of natural beauty and peace. Lisette remembers the producer saying to her and her teenage friends, "Keep smiling girls!"

Sitting in her kitchen in Mauritius many years later, she said, "I didn't have to be told to smile. I was a happy child, because my roots were deep in the islands, my paradise. My great-grandmother was born there; I made six children there. That's why they couldn't legally throw us out of our own homes; they had to terrify us into leaving or force us out. At first, they tried to starve us. The food ships stopped arriving [then] they spread rumours we would be bombed, then they turned on our dogs."

In the early 1960s, the Labour government of Harold Wilson secretly agreed to a demand from Washington that the Chagos archipelago, a British colony, be "swept" and "sanitised" of its 2,500 inhabitants so that a military base could be built on the principal island, Diego Garcia. "They knew we were inseparable from our pets," said Lizette, "When the American soldiers arrived to build the base, they backed their big trucks against the brick shed where we prepared the coconuts; hundreds of our dogs had been rounded up and imprisoned there. Then they gassed them through tubes from the trucks' exhausts. You could hear them crying."

Lisette and her family and hundreds of islanders were forced on to a rusting steamer bound for Mauritius, a distance of 2,500 miles. They were made to sleep in the hold on a cargo of fertiliser: bird shit. The weather was rough; everyone was ill; two women miscarried. Dumped on the docks at Port Louis, Lizette's youngest children, Jollice, and Regis, died within a week of each other. "They died of sadness," she said. "They had heard all the talk and seen the horror of what had happened to the dogs. They knew they were leaving their home forever. The doctor in Mauritius said he could not treat sadness."

This act of mass kidnapping was carried out in high secrecy. In one official file, under the heading, "Maintaining the fiction", the Foreign Office legal adviser exhorts his colleagues to cover their actions by "re-classifying" the population as "floating" and to "make up the rules as we go along". Article 7 of the statute of the International Criminal Court says the "deportation or forcible transfer of population" is a crime against humanity. That Britain had committed such a crime -- in exchange for a $14million discount off an American Polaris nuclear submarine - was not on the agenda of a group of British "defence"correspondents flown to the Chagos by the Ministry of Defence when the US base was completed. "There is nothing in our files," said a ministry official, "about inhabitants or an evacuation."

These true stories are told in declassified files in the Public Record Office..read more here. http://johnpilger.com/art...-democracy

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #49 posted 02/09/12 11:12am

HotGritz

clapping for the sticky!!!!! This is a good thing.

I'M NOT SAYING YOU'RE UGLY. YOU JUST HAVE BAD LUCK WHEN IT COMES TO MIRRORS AND SUNLIGHT!
RIP Dick Clark, Whitney Houston, Don Cornelius, Heavy D, and Donna Summer. rose
Reply #50 posted 02/10/12 12:06am

noimageatall

Chester Higgins, Jr.

Send to friend
Friday, February 10, 2012

Chester Higgins, Jr. is an American photographer. Higgins has worked as a New York Times photographer since 1975 and has exhibited in museums throughout the world. His one-man exhibitions have appeared at the International Center of Photography, The Museum of Photographic Arts, The Smithsonian Institution, The Museum of African Art, Musée Dapper Paris, The Schomburg Center, The New-York Historical Society and the Schatten Gallery at Emory University.

Higgins is the author of the photo collections Black Woman, Drums of Life, Some Time Ago: A Historical portrait of Black America (1850–1950), Feeling the Spirit: Searching the World for the People of Africa, Elder Grace: The Nobility of Aging, and his memoir Echo of the Spirit: A Photographer's Journey. His work is included in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art and has been included in numerous book collections and appeared in publications such as Newsweek, Fortune, Look, Essence and Life.

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #51 posted 02/10/12 7:31am

2elijah

http://www.gradesaver.com...ce-walker/

Alice Walker -Author/Writer/Poetis

Alice Walker

Alice Walker was born on February 9, 1944, in Eatonton, Georgia, the eighth and youngest child of Minnie Tallulah Grant Walker and Willie Lee Walker. Her parents were poor sharecroppers. Alice grew up in an environment of violent racism which, along with her family's poverty, left a permanent impression on her writing.

In the summer of 1952, Alice Walker was blinded in her right eye by a BB gun pellet while playing “cowboys and Indians” with her brother. She suffered permanent eye damage and slight facial disfigurement. When she was 14, her brother Bill had the cataract removed by a Boston doctor, but her vision in that eye never returned.

After graduating from high school in 1961 as the school's valedictorian and prom queen, Walker entered Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, on a scholarship. At Spelman she participated in civil rights demonstrations. She was invited to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s home in 1962 at the end of her freshman year, in recognition of another invitation she had received to attend the Youth World Peace Festival in Helsinki, Finland. She attended the conference and then traveled throughout Europe over the summer. In August 1963 Walker participated in “The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom,” where she heard King’s “I Have A Dream” speech

stories, You Can’t Keep a Good Woman Down.

In 1982 she completed The Color Purple, an epistolary novel about the life of a poor black woman named Celie. For this book, easily her most popular novel, Walker won a Pulitzer Prize in 1983 and the American Book Award. Critics again accused her of portraying black men too harshly. The Color Purple was soon made into a motion picture produced by Quincy Jones and directed by Steven Spielberg. When the film premiered in her hometown of Eatonton, Walker received a parade in her honor. Her sister Ruth even created The Color Purple Foundation to promote charitable work for education.

Study Guides on Works by Alice Walker

[Edited 2/10/12 7:32am]

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #52 posted 02/13/12 5:42am

noimageatall

I missed two days because of Whitney's passing... rose

I hope people are actually reading the info about these people. hug

Andante Higgins

Send to friend
Saturday, February 11, 2012

Andante Higgins, a San Francisco native, has worked in television news for a decade with the last seven years in New York City. Dante worked for most of this time in network news at CBS, where he continues as producer.

While at CBS News, Dante was embedded for nine months with Senator John McCain on the presidential campaign trail with duties ranging from reporter to producer, DV cameraman and interviewee for radio. He brought in raw, up-to-the minute information and video while publishing multiple daily blog posts.

Prior to this assignment, Dante worked for CBS Evening News with Katie Couric, producing daily newsbreaks, cutting voice-overs, coordinating all tape, and producing headlines as well as teases for the broadcast. He held other posts at CBS News researching stories, setting up and conducting interviews, as well as shooting and producing pieces.

clapping

Langston Hughes

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Sunday, February 12, 2012

James Mercer Langston Hughes was an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist. He was one of the earliest innovators of the then-new literary art form jazz poetry. Hughes is best known for his work during the Harlem Renaissance.

Hughes stressed a racial consciousness and cultural nationalism devoid of self-hate that united people of African descent and Africa across the globe and encouraged pride in their diverse black folk culture and black aesthetic. Hughes was one of the few black writers of any consequence to champion racial consciousness as a source of inspiration for black artists. His African-American race consciousness and cultural nationalism would influence many foreign black writers, such as Jacques Roumain, Nicolás Guillén, Léopold Sédar Senghor, and Aimé Césaire.

Maxie C. Jackson III

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Monday, February 13, 2012

Maxie C. Jackson III serves as President & Chief Executive Officer for the National Federation of Community Broadcasters (NFCB).

Jackson has served as Senior Director Program Development at New York Public Radio (WNYC) involved in strategic planning for national and local programming, outreach and audience development efforts, and new media and marketing initiatives. He was intimately involved in the launch of “The Takeaway” in addition to developing community engagement strategies and a new evening drive program for WNYC.

During his public radio career, Jackson has served on national (CPB, PRX, NPR, BBC and PRI) committees impacting public radio funding, technology, recruitment and programming. Currently, he is a member of the Development Exchange Inc. (DEI) Board of Directors, Association of Independents in Radio's (AIR) Maker’s Quest 2.0 Talent Committee, and Public Radio International’s (PRI) Program Director Advisory Group. He served on Eastern Region Public Media's (ERPM) Executive Board and the Executive Board of the African American Public Radio Consortium (AAPRC).

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #53 posted 02/13/12 5:58am

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2elijah said:

http://www.gradesaver.com...ce-walker/

Alice Walker -Author/Writer/Poetis

Alice Walker

Alice Walker was born on February 9, 1944, in Eatonton, Georgia, the eighth and youngest child of Minnie Tallulah Grant Walker and Willie Lee Walker. Her parents were poor sharecroppers. Alice grew up in an environment of violent racism which, along with her family's poverty, left a permanent impression on her writing.

In the summer of 1952, Alice Walker was blinded in her right eye by a BB gun pellet while playing “cowboys and Indians” with her brother. She suffered permanent eye damage and slight facial disfigurement. When she was 14, her brother Bill had the cataract removed by a Boston doctor, but her vision in that eye never returned.

After graduating from high school in 1961 as the school's valedictorian and prom queen, Walker entered Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, on a scholarship. At Spelman she participated in civil rights demonstrations. She was invited to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s home in 1962 at the end of her freshman year, in recognition of another invitation she had received to attend the Youth World Peace Festival in Helsinki, Finland. She attended the conference and then traveled throughout Europe over the summer. In August 1963 Walker participated in “The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom,” where she heard King’s “I Have A Dream” speech

stories, You Can’t Keep a Good Woman Down.

In 1982 she completed The Color Purple, an epistolary novel about the life of a poor black woman named Celie. For this book, easily her most popular novel, Walker won a Pulitzer Prize in 1983 and the American Book Award. Critics again accused her of portraying black men too harshly. The Color Purple was soon made into a motion picture produced by Quincy Jones and directed by Steven Spielberg. When the film premiered in her hometown of Eatonton, Walker received a parade in her honor. Her sister Ruth even created The Color Purple Foundation to promote charitable work for education.

I love her!! heart

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #54 posted 02/13/12 11:17am

morningsong

Dr. Jim Gates

Dr. Sylvester James Gates, Jr. has a number of "firsts" to his name. His doctoral dissertation at M.I.T. was the first ever at that university on supersymmetry. In 1994, he became the first recipient of the American Physical Society's Edward A. Bouchet Award, given to a minority physicist who has made significant contributions to his field. And when in 1998 he was named the first John S. Toll Professor of Physics at the University of Maryland, he became the first African-American to hold an endowed chair in physics at a major U.S. research university. Here, Gates talks about firsts he hopes to see in string theory, including the first signs of supersymmetry and perhaps of that most elusive beast—a unification of the four forces of nature.

"Right now, NASA's annual budget is half a penny on your tax dollar. ...—a penny on a dollar—we can transform the country ... , to one where it has reclaimed its 20th century birthright to dream of tomorrow." Tyson
Reply #55 posted 02/13/12 6:23pm

2elijah

PBS is airing a documentary on Douglas Blackmon's book "Slavery by Another Name" tonight. I mentioned this book on past BH threads. The documentary is regarding forgotten, post-slavery civil war slaves.. Laurence Fishburne is narrating and they are showing graphics from

Mr. Blackmon's book. They have descendants of those who participated in the abuses/crimes, telling stories of what they knew of their relatives who took part in many of the abuses/crimes, as well as descendants of the victims, telling stories of their family members who suffered by the hands of their captives/abusers. There are also re-enactments, and historians participating in the documentary.

It exposes/discusses the illegal arrests of many Black men and women after post-civil war, who were imprisoned on trumped-up charges and forced to work in labor camps in the U.S., for coal mines, steel mills and farms. Much of this took place in the early to mid 1900s. There was also the leasing of convicts, black and white, who were abused by those who leased them. It also exposes the story of a white, leased convict, who was abused/murdered by the people he worked for.

Very interesting, educational and historical documentary. This documentary was recently shown at the Sundance Festival. I applaud Douglas Blackmon for his dedication and compassion in making sure this part of American history does not remain untold.

Airing on Monday, February 13, 2012 at 9pm on PBS (channel 13 in NYC)Check your local PBS listings for air dates.

http://www.eurweb.com/201...ys-cynics/

Slavery by Another Name’ Author Hopes PBS Film Sways Cynics

February 13, 2012 by Cherie Saunders

Author Douglas A. Blackmon speaks during the 'Slavery By Another Name' panel during the PBS portion of the 2012 Winter TCA Tour held at The Langham Huntington Hotel and Spa on Jan. 4, 2012 in Pasadena

The anticipated TV premiere of “Slavery by Another Name” finally makes its PBS debut tonight (Feb. 13) at 9 p.m. [Check local listings.]

Narrated by Lawrence Fishburne, the 90-minute documentary tells how former slaves, just after the Emancipation Proclamation, were often arrested on trumped up charges and forced to work for free as prisoners under a loophole in the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery, except in the case of punishment for a crime.

Thousands of newly-freed slaves were arrested for such “infractions” as being unemployed, leaving one job for another one, selling cotton after sundown or speaking too loudly in front of white women. Once incarcerated, the prisoners were shackled, bought and sold and whipped as they were forced to work without pay in coal mines, brickyards, turpentine farms and plantations.

The forced labor was not only tolerated in the North at the highest levels of government, but it lasted for more than 80 years – well into World War II.

The film is based on the Pulitzer Prize winning book of the same name penned by Wall Street Journal writer Douglas Blackmon. “The book grew out of a story that I wrote in the Wall Street Journal now more than ten years ago. And that story grew out of my interest in the way that American corporations had never really quite been held to account for their involvement in the enforcement of Jim Crow segregation and those sorts of abuses,” said Blackmon.

His 2001 article revealed how the U.S. Steel Corporation had owned coal mines in Alabama that, in the early part of the 20th century, were still clearly operating with black slave workers.

“I was shocked by that in the beginning and then wrote that initial story, which took a very long time,” Blackmon said. “And then when I began working on the book, which took six and a half years to write, I was astonished by just the discovery that this wasn’t this bad place in Alabama where one company went off the rails and did a lot of bad things to a few thousand people. This was a story of a whole system of enslavement that existed everywhere in the rural deep South, where there was a large black population.

“Essentially where the slaves had been, there was a new form of slavery. And it existed almost everywhere on a huge scale, and in direct and indirect ways, millions of people were dramatically affected by all of this. I was shocked by the kind of brutality that was that insinuated through every aspect of this. The level of violence, the level of physical abuse was specific and horrifying to me to discover.”

(L-R) Executive Producer Catherine Allan, Filmmaker Samuel D. Pollard, Dr. Sharon Malone, Susan Tuggle Burnore and author Douglas A. Blackmon speak during the 'Slavery By Another Name' panel during the PBS portion of the 2012 Winter TCA Tour held at The Langham Huntington Hotel and Spa on Jan. 4, 2012 in Pasadena

As previously reported, the documentary’s director Sam Pollard received a nearly two-minute standing ovation after the film’s premiere last month at the Sundance Film Festival. The screen version includes interviews with descendants from either side of the forced labor practice: Susan Burnore, whose great-grandfather – a farmer in 1920s Georgia – murdered 11 former slaves who were working illegally on his farm; and Dr. Sharon Malone, whose uncle was a victim of forced labor in the early part of the century.

RELATED: Eric Holder’s ...er Name’

Both the book and the film, Blackmon says, are meant to hip-check those among us who believe blacks need to get over slavery because it’s in the past.

(Edited for compliance)

[Edited 2/13/12 20:02pm]

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #56 posted 02/14/12 3:52pm

HotGritz

Not sure if this was discussed on the org or not but if so, it is definitely worth sharing once again.

http://www.huffingtonpost...47288.html

In Rediscovered Letter From 1865, Former Slave Tells Old Master To Shove It (UPDATE)

Dayton, Ohio,

August 7, 1865

To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdon, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin's to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy,—the folks call her Mrs. Anderson,—and the children—Milly, Jane, and Grundy—go to school and are learning well. The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated. Sometimes we overhear others saying, "Them colored people were slaves" down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson. Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars. Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor's visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams's Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows.

Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve—and die, if it come to that—than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant,

Jourdon Anderson.

I'M NOT SAYING YOU'RE UGLY. YOU JUST HAVE BAD LUCK WHEN IT COMES TO MIRRORS AND SUNLIGHT!
RIP Dick Clark, Whitney Houston, Don Cornelius, Heavy D, and Donna Summer. rose
Reply #57 posted 02/15/12 3:54am

noimageatall

HotGritz said:

Not sure if this was discussed on the org or not but if so, it is definitely worth sharing once again.

http://www.huffingtonpost...47288.html

In Rediscovered Letter From 1865, Former Slave Tells Old Master To Shove It (UPDATE)

Dayton, Ohio,

August 7, 1865

To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdon, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin's to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy,—the folks call her Mrs. Anderson,—and the children—Milly, Jane, and Grundy—go to school and are learning well. The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated. Sometimes we overhear others saying, "Them colored people were slaves" down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson. Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars. Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor's visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams's Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows.

Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve—and die, if it come to that—than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant,

Jourdon Anderson.

I love it!!!! clapping

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #58 posted 02/15/12 3:56am

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Randall Kenan

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Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Randall Kenan is an American author of fiction and nonfiction. Raised in a rural community in North Carolina, Kenan has focused his fiction on what it means to be black and gay in the southern United States. Among his books is the collection of short stories Let the Dead Bury Their Dead, which was named a New York Times Notable Book in 1992. Kenan is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Writers Award and the John Dos Passos Prize.

Kenan strongly identifies with both his African American and gay identities, both of which were highlighted in his next two books. In 1993 he published a young adult biography of gay African American novelist and essayist James Baldwin. Kenan has frequently stated that Baldwin is one of his idols. He then spent several years traveling across America and Canada collecting oral histories of African Americans, which he published in Walking on Water: Black American Lives at the Turn of the Twenty-first Century (1999).

Kenan has won a number of writing awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Writers Award, the Sherwood Anderson Award, the John Dos Passos Award, and the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Clarence E. Lang

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Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Clarence E. Lang is an Associate Professor in the African American Studies, and the Department of History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received a B.A. in Journalism from the University of Missouri-Columbia, where he minored in Black Studies. He earned his M.A. in History from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville (SIUE), and his Ph.D. in History from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. While completing his Doctorate, he was a Lecturer at SlUE, and a Research Associate at Wayne State University. Dr. Lang has been an intern and reporter at the Chicago Sun-Times, a Davis-Putter Scholar, and a Summer Research Fellow at the Missouri Historical Society Library and Research Center.

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #59 posted 02/16/12 1:42pm

smoothcriminal12

Celebrating black innovators in music

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #60 posted 02/16/12 1:47pm

smoothcriminal12

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #61 posted 02/16/12 3:20pm

HotGritz

GENE CHANDLER THE DUKE OF EARL - was listening to this on the oldies station music gotta love that old old school.

http://en.wikipedia.org/w...ke_of_Earl

"Duke of Earl" is a 1962 US number-one song, originally by Gene Chandler. It is the best known of Chandler's songs, and he subsequently dubbed himself 'The Duke of Earl'. The song was penned by Bernice Williams, Eugene Dixon (Chandler's real name), and Earl Edwards.

The song originated from warm-up exercises by the Dukays, a vocal group who included singers Gene Dixon and Earl Edwards and who had already had some success on the R&B chart. The group would regularly warm up by singing "Do do do do..." in different keys. On one occasion, Dixon changed the syllables he was singing to include Earl's name, and the chant gradually became the nonsense words "Du..du..du..Duke of Earl". The pair worked on the song with regular songwriter and mentor Bernice Williams, and then recorded it with the other members of the Dukays. However, the group's record company preferred to release another song, "Nite Owl", leaving Dixon with the offer of releasing it as a solo artist. Changing his name to Gene Chandler (a surname taken from that of the actor Jeff Chandler), the song was released at the end of 1961, quickly rising to become number 1 on both the pop and R&B charts.[2][3] "Duke of Earl" debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on January 13, 1962, and held the number-one spot for three weeks. It whttp://en.wikipedia.org/..._of_Earlas on the Hot 100 for a total of 15 weeks.

I'M NOT SAYING YOU'RE UGLY. YOU JUST HAVE BAD LUCK WHEN IT COMES TO MIRRORS AND SUNLIGHT!
RIP Dick Clark, Whitney Houston, Don Cornelius, Heavy D, and Donna Summer. rose
Reply #62 posted 02/16/12 10:42pm

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Julius Lester

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Thursday, February 16, 2012

Julius Lester is an American author of books for children and adults, and taught for 32 years (1971–2003) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He is also a photographer, as well as a musician who recorded two albums of folk music and original songs.

During his New York years, Lester hosted a radio show on WBAI-FM (1968–1975), co-hosted a television show on Channel 13 for two years, taught a course on Afro-American history at the New School for Social Research, recorded two albums of traditional and original songs for Vanguard Records, "Julius Lester" (1966) and "Departures" (1967). A compilation of songs from both albums was released on a CD, "Dressed Like Freedom", on Ace Records in 2007. During this time, Lester became active in the civil rights movement, first as a folk singer at numerous civil rights rallies and as part of the 1964 Mississippi Summer Project. In 1966 he began working full time with SNCC (Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee) as a photographer and traveled to North Vietnam to document U.S. bombing of the country, something the U.S. government was denying at the time. That same year he traveled to Cuba where he and Stokely Carmichael spent three days traveling with Fidel Castro through the mountains of eastern Cuba.

During his 32 years at the university, Lester taught courses in five departments: Comparative Literature ("Black and White Southern Fiction), English ("Religion in Western Literature), Afro-American Studies ("The Writings of W.E.B. DuBois"), ("Writings of James Baldwin"), ("Literature of the Harlem Renaissance"), ("Blacks and Jews: A Comparative Study"), and Judaic Studies ("Biblical Tales and Legends"), and ("The Writings of Elie Weisel"), History ("Social Change and the 1960s"), one of the university's largest and most popular courses. He was awarded all three of the university's most prestigious faculty awards: The Distinguished Teacher's Award, the Faculty Fellowship Award for Distinguished Research and Scholarship, and the Chancellor's Medal,the university's highest honor. The Council for Advancement and Support of Education selected him as the Massachusetts State Professor of the Year.

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #63 posted 02/17/12 4:07pm

free2bfreeda

luv4u said:

Dunno if this fits on this thread but I just came across this ........

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/...53952.html

thx for the info here. interesting reading. nod

The truth is often a terrible weapon of aggression. “Those who are capable of tyranny and injustice are capable of perjury to sustain it.”
Reply #64 posted 02/17/12 4:13pm

free2bfreeda

[deleted - post accidently duplicated]

[Edited 2/21/12 12:36pm]

The truth is often a terrible weapon of aggression. “Those who are capable of tyranny and injustice are capable of perjury to sustain it.”
Reply #65 posted 02/18/12 7:19am

2elijah

This was already posted in reply #33;guess you must have missed that. lol

free2bfreeda said:

many brave african american men and women gave their lives during the civil war in america.

Forgotten American History Page

1942 - The 27th Cavalry
1942 - The 28th Cavalry
1942 - The Tuskegee Airmen
1866 - The 25th Infantry Regiment 1944 - The Red Ball Express
1866 - -The 24th Infantry Regiment 1944 - The 555 "Triple Nickles
1873 - Henry Ossian Flipper
1876 - Trooper Benjamin C. Criswell
1866 - Emanuel Stance 2005 - Governor Signs Bil... Soldiers
1875 - Bass Reeves Buffalo Soldiers Q&A
1881 - 2nd Lt. George R. Burnett 1881 - Buffalo Soldiers i...Territory Medal of Honor Winners
1870 - Sergeant George Jordan 1881 - 1st Sgt. Moses Williams Other Links
761st Tank Battalion " Black Panthers"

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #66 posted 02/18/12 7:39am

2elijah

The founders of the "Black Stuntman Association" receiving NAACP President's award at 2012 NAACP Awards ceremony.

43rd NAACP Image Awards - Red Carpet

http://blackhistorymonth....Itemid=262

Black Stuntmen's Association Fought Good Fight

Founded in 1967, the Black Stuntmen's Association was created to combat practices that denied black stuntmen the opportunity to perform in Hollywood productions. The group helped break the color barrier in the stuntman profession.


Prior to their advocacy and activism, stunts for black actors were done by white performers "painted down" to a darker complexion. The organization filed lawsuits against several major movie studios to help bring an end to this discriminatory practice and to ensure equal opportunity and access to stunt roles for all races.


Members of the Black Stuntmen's Association went on to redefine the profession, performing in iconic films and television programs like "Dirty Harry," "I Spy," "Uptown Saturday Night" and "Buck and the Preacher."


Willie Harris of Las Vegas, Nevada was one of the first members of the Black Stuntmen’s Association.


"It was racism, pure and simple," Harris told reporters in a 2009 interview. Harris retired from stunt work after suffering a back injury in 1974. "They didn’t want to pay us the same price or give us the same protection they were giving white stuntmen, and a lot of guys were getting hurt."


Edward "Eddie" Smith co-founded the Black Stuntmen's Association in 1967 and fought to generate jobs for African-American stuntmen in Hollywood. Smith died in 2005 at age 81.


Smith formed the group after, while serving as an extra on the star-filled 1963 comedy "It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World," he saw a white stuntman being made up to be the stunt double for black actor Eddie "Rochester" Anderson.


Over the years, Smith worked as a stuntman or stunt coordinator on numerous television shows and films, including "MASH," "Dirty Harry," "Beneath the Planet of the Apes," "Blazing Saddles," "Earthquake," "Scarface," "The Nutty Professor" and the TV miniseries, "Roots."


He also took pride in being the only African-American stunt coordinator on (pictured) "Live and Let Die," the 1973 James Bond movie.

(Edited for compliance)

In 2009, the U.S. House of Representatives issued a resolution honoring the Black Stuntmen’s Association and the Coalition of Black Stuntmen and Women for their "dedication in pursing equality and justice for all people." The Smithsonian Institute is currently planning to curate an exhibit to honor the Black Stuntmen's Association in Washington, D.C.


The organization's founding members will receive the President’s Award during the 43rd NAACP Image Awards, which will be broadcast live on Friday, Feb. 17 on NBC. Past honorees include President Bill Clinton, Soledad O'Brien, Ruby Dee, Muhammad Ali and Van Jones.

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #67 posted 02/18/12 10:26am

free2bfreeda

1896: African American Buffalo Soldiers test bikes for Army on 1,900 mile expedition

Bicycle Corps at Minerva Terrace, Yellowstone National Park, 1897.

Formed in 1896, the 25th Infantry Bicycle Corps at Fort Missoula, Mont., was established to test the practicality of bikes for military purposes in mountainous terrain. The idea had been kicking around for years, as bikes already had been put to military use in Europe, and cycling for sport, recreation and transportation gained tremendous popularity on both sides of the Atlantic in the 1890s.

Gen. Nelson A. Miles, born in Westminster, Mass., began advocating for bicycle couriers in the Army after seeing a six-day bicycle race in Madison Square Garden in New York in 1891. He wrote that unlike a horse, a bike did not need to be fed and watered and rested, and would be less likely to collapse. Furthermore, a bike is smaller and quieter than a horse and thus could help a soldier sneak up on the enemy, he argued. It was Gen. Miles, who became known as “the patron of military cycling,” who approved Lt. James A. Moss’ request from Missoula to form the bicycle corps.

The 25th Infantry regiment was made up of black men, known as buffalo soldiers, commanded by white officers. Its Bicycle Corps began with eight riders using one-speed Spalding bicycles on loan from the manufacturer in Chicago. Their exploits are detailed in the book “Iron Riders: Story of the 1890s Fort Missoula Buffalo Soldiers Bicycle Corps”

note:

The Twenty-fifth United States Infantry Regiment was one of the racially segregated units of the United States Army known as Buffalo Soldiers. The 25th served from 1866 to 1946, seeing action in the American Indian Wars, Spanish-American War, Philippine-American War and World War II.

25th InfantryCoat of arms

025th Infantry Regiment COA.png

The truth is often a terrible weapon of aggression. “Those who are capable of tyranny and injustice are capable of perjury to sustain it.”
Reply #68 posted 02/18/12 5:51pm

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Arielle Loren

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Friday, February 17, 2012

Arielle Loren is a writer and filmmaker that offers real-life commentary on women’s issues, sexuality, health, and travel. She has written for Jezebel, Racialicious, Carnal Nation, Ebony, Vibe Vixen, Clutch, and Frugivore magazine. As a filmmaker, she directed and produced BIDEOLOGY, a feature-length documentary that explores women dating bisexual men. TheRoot.com says the film “explores lessons heterosexual women can learn from men who don’t have a fixed sexual orientation.”

Arielle has been a guest on Abiola Abram’s Love, Sex, and Dating show in addition to holding a spot in ForHarriet.com’s 30 Black Women Bloggers You Should Know. She’s also been quoted in NPR, AOL Black Voices, and Madame Noire.

As the founding editor and publisher of CORSET, Arielle leads the “go-to magazine for all things sexuality.” Embracing human curiosity, restoring sensuality, and celebrating sex, CORSET delivers enlightening, empowering, educational, and entertaining content to readers ready to step beyond their comfort zones and uplift a necessary discourse.

A full-time entrepreneur, Arielle also mentors women business owners through her media company, L Media House. She’s held full-time social media marketing positions with a top New York agency and non-profit organizations. Currently, she offers one-on-one training in social media marketing, branding, and strategic positioning. She also offers project management services on a case-by-case basis. Recently, she was featured in EBONY magazine and nominated to receive the 2011 Women’s Media Center Social Media Award for empowering women online.

Manning Marable

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Saturday, February 18, 2012

William Manning Marable was an American professor of public affairs, history and African-American Studies at Columbia University. Marable founded and directed the Institute for Research in African-American Studies. Marable authored several texts and was active in progressive political causes. At the time of his death, Marable had completed a biography of human rights activist Malcolm X, entitled Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention.

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #69 posted 02/19/12 2:20pm

free2bfreeda

Cathay Williams.gif

Cathay Williams (September 1844 - 1892) was an American soldier. She is the first African American female to enlist, and the only documented to serve in the United States Army posing as a man under the pseudonym, William Cathay

The truth is often a terrible weapon of aggression. “Those who are capable of tyranny and injustice are capable of perjury to sustain it.”
Reply #70 posted 02/19/12 9:28pm

noimageatall

free2bfreeda said:

Cathay Williams.gif

Cathay Williams (September 1844 - 1892) was an American soldier. She is the first African American female to enlist, and the only documented to serve in the United States Army posing as a man under the pseudonym, William Cathay

Wow...I really love the stories of females who did this to do what the hell they wanted to do. woot!

Chandra McCormick

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Sunday, February 19, 2012

Chandra McCormick is a documentary photographer who chronicles the sociocultural aspects of human life. Born in New Orleans in 1957, her career background includes photography, activism, and history, which has given her a unique capability to focus on a range of subjects not commonly covered by other documentary photographers.

McCormick is renowned for capturing many different aspects of New Orleans culture, as well as the lifestyles of her fellow New Orleanians. In addition to documenting the city's social and cultural history, McCormick has studied and documented religious ceremonies of the Spiritual Churches, which have rarely been captured. She has also focused on African American laborers, such as sugarcane scrappers and sweet potato workers of rural Louisiana. She has produced an extensive body of work on Angola Prison, focusing on its incarcerated men and the impact of the prison system on their families; the work was featured in Aperture in February 2006.

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #71 posted 02/21/12 11:23am

free2bfreeda

(re: posted for the direct link to documentary on pbs.)

Historical contortion

An Age of Neoslavery

Across the South, a new variety of slavery emerged after the Civil War. Laws were rewritten to criminalize African-American life. The judicial system was retooled to provide cheap forced labor to mines, farms, timber camps, turpentine makers, railroad builders and entrepreneurs large and small. Tens of thousands of men, the vast majority of them black, found themselves pulled back into slavery through being imprisoned.

please watch the entire documentary Slavery by Another Name
link: http://www.pbs.org/tpt/sl...ame/watch/

i hope you will watch this documentary and pass it on to a friend.

flag

[Edited 2/21/12 12:20pm]

The truth is often a terrible weapon of aggression. “Those who are capable of tyranny and injustice are capable of perjury to sustain it.”
Reply #72 posted 02/21/12 11:59am

2elijah

^^^Hi Freeda,

I'm not sure if you're checking to see if the same information has already been posted on the thread. I posted that information on Douglas Blackmon's "Slavery by Another Name" already in reply #55 .

[Edited 2/21/12 12:11pm]

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #73 posted 02/21/12 12:13pm

2elijah

smoothcriminal12 said:

Celebrating black innovators in music

Cool post. Thanks.

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #74 posted 02/21/12 12:19pm

free2bfreeda

2elijah said:

^^^Hi Freeda,

I'm not sure if you're checking to see if the same information has already been posted on the thread. I posted that information on Douglas Blackmon's "Slavery by Another Name" already in reply #55 .

[Edited 2/21/12 12:11pm]

sorry for my oversight. i've edited, shortened and deleted most of my post except for the direct link to the pbs documentary video. i hope it's okay w/you.

neutral

[Edited 2/21/12 12:22pm]

The truth is often a terrible weapon of aggression. “Those who are capable of tyranny and injustice are capable of perjury to sustain it.”
Reply #75 posted 02/21/12 12:22pm

2elijah

free2bfreeda said:

2elijah said:

^^^Hi Freeda,

I'm not sure if you're checking to see if the same information has already been posted on the thread. I posted that information on Douglas Blackmon's "Slavery by Another Name" already in reply #55 .

[Edited 2/21/12 12:11pm]

sorry for my oversight. i've edited and deleted most of my post except for the direct link to the pbs documentary video. i hope it's okay w/you.

wink

No need to apologize.biggrin I was just letting you know that info was posted already.

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #76 posted 02/21/12 12:24pm

free2bfreeda

2elijah said:

free2bfreeda said:

sorry for my oversight. i've edited and deleted most of my post except for the direct link to the pbs documentary video. i hope it's okay w/you.

wink

No need to apologize.biggrin I was just letting you know that info was posted already.

okay thx, and once again sorry for the oversight.

The truth is often a terrible weapon of aggression. “Those who are capable of tyranny and injustice are capable of perjury to sustain it.”
Reply #77 posted 02/21/12 12:54pm

2elijah

free2bfreeda said:

2elijah said:

No need to apologize.biggrin I was just letting you know that info was posted already.

okay thx, and once again sorry for the oversight.

No prob.biggrin By the way, I watched that documentary and learned a lot from it. It is hard to believe all that was happening in the 1900s - 1960s. I read the book 2 years ago. It was my sister that told me about it. I just happened to be looking through the cable tv listings the day this documentary first aired, and was shocked, surprised and happy a documentary was made to tell the story of these past events.

Douglas Blackmon has been on tv programs and has basically done a speaking tour about this at various institutions, to bring this historical event to light. It's basically a 'forgotten' part of American history, that seems to have been left out of the history books by some chance. He's been on Bill Moyers discussing this in the past while promoting his book.

Here's a link to the interview Bill Moyers and Douglas Blackmon:

http://www.pbs.org/moyers...atch2.html

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #78 posted 02/21/12 12:55pm

free2bfreeda

New York Architect http://architecture.about...p/bond.htm

J. Max Bond, Jr., New York Visionary

New York Architect J. Max Bond, Jr.

New York Architect J. Max Bond, Jr

Education: Harvard University: bachelor’s degree in 1955 and a master’s degree in 1958
Major Projects:
  • Schomburg Centre for Research in Black Culture in Harlem, NY
  • Birmingham Civil Rights Institute in Alabama
  • Martin Luther King Jr. cr...d memorial in Atlanta, Georgia
  • A controversial modernist expansion of the Harvard Club in midtown Manhattan
  • The Bolgatanga Regional Library in Ghana, which provided a unique roof design that provided natural ventilation
  • With his firm, Davis Brody Bond Aedas, helped flesh out plans for the September 11 Memorial Museum

Teaching:

  • Columbia University
  • Served as dean for the school of architecture at the City University of New York

Associations:

  • Worked with André Wogenscky in France
  • Worked at Gruzen & Partners and Pedersen & Tilney in New York
  • Established the Architect's Renewal Committee of Harlem
  • Co-founded the firm of Ryder Bond and Associates. In 1990, this firm merged with Davis Brody & Associates

More About J. Max Bond, Jr.:

When J. Max Bond, Jr. was a student at Harvard, racists burned a cross outside his dormitory. Concerned, a white professor at the University advised Bond to abandon his dream of becoming an architect.

Years later, in an interview for the Washington Post, Bond recalled his professor saying, "There have never been any famous, prominent black architects... You'd be wise to choose another profession."

Fortunately, Bond had spent a summer working for African-American architect Paul Williams and he knew that he could overcome racial stereotypes.

After graduating from Harvard, Bond designed many office buildings, libraries, and university research facilities in the United States. He worked on buildings designed by the Swiss-born architect Le Corbusier, and also designed some buildings in Ghana and Zimbabwe. He became a fellow in the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and an inspiration to young minorities in his architecture classes at Columbia and City University.

In addition to his many accomplishments, J. Max Bond, Jr. will be long remembered for his role in developing plans for the National 9/11 Museum in New York City.
The truth is often a terrible weapon of aggression. “Those who are capable of tyranny and injustice are capable of perjury to sustain it.”
Reply #79 posted 02/22/12 10:10am

free2bfreeda

i speculated on this, but never thought it to be true.

George Washington and slavery

http://en.wikipedia.org/w...nd_slavery

George Washington

George Washington was a slave owner for practically all of his professional life. His will provided for freeing his slaves upon the death of his widow Martha Washington, but she emancipated them about 12 months after his death. Although Washington personally opposed the institution of slavery after the American Revolutionary War, as President, he authorized emergency financial and military relief to French slave owners in Haiti to suppress a slave rebellion that began in 1791.

Washington signed the Northwest Territory Act that banned slavery in the Northwest Territory in 1789, but did not free slaves already in the territory. The 1790 Naturalization Act provided a means to incorporate foreigners as United States citizens, but provided for naturalization only of whites (Caucasians). Washington signed the 1793 Fugitive Slave Law, the first to provide for the right of slaveholders to recapture slaves even in free states that had abolished slavery.

famous quote:

"People learn something every day, and a lot of times it's that what they learned the day before was wrong."

~Bill Vaughan

The truth is often a terrible weapon of aggression. “Those who are capable of tyranny and injustice are capable of perjury to sustain it.”
Reply #80 posted 02/22/12 10:48am

2elijah

free2bfreeda said:

i speculated on this, but never thought it to be true.

George Washington and slavery

http://en.wikipedia.org/w...nd_slavery

George Washington

George Washington was a slave owner for practically all of his professional life. His will provided for freeing his slaves upon the death of his widow Martha Washington, but she emancipated them about 12 months after his death. Although Washington personally opposed the institution of slavery after the American Revolutionary War, as President, he authorized emergency financial and military relief to French slave owners in Haiti to suppress a slave rebellion that began in 1791.

Washington signed the Northwest Territory Act that banned slavery in the Northwest Territory in 1789, but did not free slaves already in the territory. The 1790 Naturalization Act provided a means to incorporate foreigners as United States citizens, but provided for naturalization only of whites (Caucasians). Washington signed the 1793 Fugitive Slave Law, the first to provide for the right of slaveholders to recapture slaves even in free states that had abolished slavery.

famous quote:

"People learn something every day, and a lot of times it's that what they learned the day before was wrong."

~Bill Vaughan

Very interesting. Thanks.

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #81 posted 02/23/12 4:21pm

noimageatall

free2bfreeda said:

"People learn something every day, and a lot of times it's that what they learned the day before was wrong."

~Bill Vaughan

Thanks for that info. Great quote!!! thumbs up!

I've been slacking...

Pamela Mitchell

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Monday, February 20, 2012

Former entertainment executive turned coach Pamela Mitchell is founder and CEO of The Reinvention Institute. She is a popular and in-demand speaker who gives talks around the country to individuals, corporations and industry groups who are interested in learning fresh strategies for navigating in the midst of change. As the nation’s premier career reinvention expert, she has appeared on the Today Show, CNN, MSNBC and NPR, and been profiled and quoted in top media publications including The Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek, More, Men’s Health, Good Housekeeping, Kiplinger’s and Black Enterprise. She was a columnist for Inc.com, the website for INC. magazine, and is the author of The 10 Laws of Career Reinvention: Essential Survival Skills for Any Economy (Dutton, January 2010), a Harvard Business Review Top Shelf Recommended pick.

Stanley Nelson

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Tuesday, February 21, 2012

clapping

An award-winning filmmaker, Stanley Nelson has over 20 years' experience as a producer, director, and writer of documentary films and videos. Founder and president of Half Nelson Productions, Inc., an independent production company, his most recent production is The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords, a documentary on the history of African American newspapers which has received the support of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Ford Foundation, among others.

Nelson's independently-produced films include a number of PBS productions, including Shattering the Silences,a 90-minute film on the growing presence of and challenges to minority faculty in higher education; Methadone: Curse or Cure, a one-hour documentary on the methadone maintenance program for the treatment of heroin addiction; Two Dollars and a Dream: The Story of Madame C.J. Walker, on the life and times of the African American businesswoman who became the nation's first self-made woman millionaire (winner of the CINE Golden Eagle, and cited as the Best Production of the Decade by the Black Filmmaker Foundation); Puerto Rico: Our Right to Decide, the story of competing visions for the future of Puerto Rico, shot on location (CINE Golden Eagle); Freedom Bags, a documentary on the northern migration of African American domestic workers during the first half of the 20th century; and the South Africa segments of Mandela, the story of Nelson and Winnie Mandela.

Jill Nelson

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Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Jill Nelson was born and raised in Harlem and has been a working journalist for over twenty years. She is a graduate of the City College of New York and the Columbia School of Journalism. Her work has appeared in numerous publications, including The New York Times, Essence, The Washington Post, The Nation, Ms., The Chicago Tribune and the Village Voice. Jill was a staff writer for the Washington Post Magazine during its first years of existence, and was named Washington D.C. Journalist of the Year for her work there. She freelances and lectures widely, and writes a twice-monthly column, “On the Verge,” for NiaOnline.com and is a monthly contributor to the Op Ed page of USA Today. She was a professor of Journalism at the City College of New York from 1998 to 2003. Jill wrote the best-selling memoir, Volunteer Slavery: My Authentic Negro Experience (Noble Press, hardcover, 1993 and Penguin, paperback, 1994) which won an American Book Award. She is the author of Straight, No Chaser: How I Became A Grown-Up Black Woman (Putnam, Fall 1997, Penguin, Winter 1999) and edited Police Brutality: An Anthology, for WW Norton, published in April 2000. Her first novel, Sexual Healing, was released in June 2003. Her latest book, the non-fiction Finding Martha’s Vineyard: African Americans at Home on an Island, was published in May 2005 by Random House.

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #82 posted 02/24/12 1:31pm

free2bfreeda

noimageatall said:

free2bfreeda said:

"People learn something every day, and a lot of times it's that what they learned the day before was wrong."

~Bill Vaughan

Thanks for that info. Great quote!!! thumbs up!

your welcome, and back at you for your wonderful post. nod

im adding: http://en.wikipedia.org/w..._Canadians

excerpt:

There is a sizable community of Black Canadians in Nova Scotia and Southern Ontario who trace their ancestry to African American slaves who used the Underground Railroad to flee from the United States, seeking refuge and freedom in Canada.

From the late 1820s until the American Civil War began in 1861, the Underground Railroad brought tens of thousands of fugitive slaves to Canada. While many of these returned to the United States after emancipation, a significant population remained, largely in Southern Ontario, widely scattered in both rural and urban locations, including Toronto.

also:

Anderson Ruffin Abbott, the first Black Canadian to be a licensed physician, participated in the American Civil War and attended the death bed of Abraham Lincoln.

The truth is often a terrible weapon of aggression. “Those who are capable of tyranny and injustice are capable of perjury to sustain it.”
Reply #83 posted 02/25/12 8:23am

noimageatall

I remember this man... love

Male model Renauld White revolutionized the industry by demanding equal representation in mainstream publications. In November 1979, White was the first African-American model to appear on the cover of GQ magazine (a fact oft overlooked as the first black man to cover GQ was Swiss born Urs Althaus in 1977).

According to White, he got his start when he came to New York from nearby New Jersey one day to demand that agents at Wilhemina models allow more people of color the chance to compete in the industry. He said, “I wanted to bring about change. I really confronted the establishment about why there were not more black male images. At first I thought I was going to get thrown in jail and beaten up because of my approach. But then they realized that they were wrong and that they were behind society and behind the times, and that they had to listen to me.”

“They offered me a contract because they thought that I would fail. Eventually I proved myself.” White went on to not only cover GQ, but also score major campaigns with Black Tie cologne, Vitalis, and Arrows Shirts. He was the first black man to work the runways for Bill Blass, Calvin Klein, Donna Karan, and Ralph Lauren. He also enjoyed success in Europe, where he walked for Yves Saint Laurent, Jean Charles de Castelbajac, Cerutti, Valentino, Armani, and Versace.

White later transitioned into the world of theater. He appeared on the soap opera “The Guiding Light,” for many years and now participates in several plays.


"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #84 posted 02/25/12 4:22pm

2elijah

noimageatall said:

I remember this man... love

Male model Renauld White revolutionized the industry by demanding equal representation in mainstream publications. In November 1979, White was the first African-American model to appear on the cover of GQ magazine (a fact oft overlooked as the first black man to cover GQ was Swiss born Urs Althaus in 1977).

According to White, he got his start when he came to New York from nearby New Jersey one day to demand that agents at Wilhemina models allow more people of color the chance to compete in the industry. He said, “I wanted to bring about change. I really confronted the establishment about why there were not more black male images. At first I thought I was going to get thrown in jail and beaten up because of my approach. But then they realized that they were wrong and that they were behind society and behind the times, and that they had to listen to me.”

“They offered me a contract because they thought that I would fail. Eventually I proved myself.” White went on to not only cover GQ, but also score major campaigns with Black Tie cologne, Vitalis, and Arrows Shirts. He was the first black man to work the runways for Bill Blass, Calvin Klein, Donna Karan, and Ralph Lauren. He also enjoyed success in Europe, where he walked for Yves Saint Laurent, Jean Charles de Castelbajac, Cerutti, Valentino, Armani, and Versace.

White later transitioned into the world of theater. He appeared on the soap opera “The Guiding Light,” for many years and now participates in several plays.


Wow thanks. I don't think I've ever heard of him. He looks like one of my younger sister's ex-boyfriends. Thanks fof the info. Interesting.

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #85 posted 02/25/12 7:01pm

smoothcriminal12

free2bfreeda said:

noimageatall said:

Thanks for that info. Great quote!!! thumbs up!

your welcome, and back at you for your wonderful post. nod

im adding: http://en.wikipedia.org/w..._Canadians

excerpt:

There is a sizable community of Black Canadians in Nova Scotia and Southern Ontario who trace their ancestry to African American slaves who used the Underground Railroad to flee from the United States, seeking refuge and freedom in Canada.

From the late 1820s until the American Civil War began in 1861, the Underground Railroad brought tens of thousands of fugitive slaves to Canada. While many of these returned to the United States after emancipation, a significant population remained, largely in Southern Ontario, widely scattered in both rural and urban locations, including Toronto.

also:

Anderson Ruffin Abbott, the first Black Canadian to be a licensed physician, participated in the American Civil War and attended the death bed of Abraham Lincoln.

Recognize us! cool

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #86 posted 02/26/12 5:56pm

2elijah

Black in Latin America - on PBS - 2/26/12 - 9pm

This is showing on PBS tonight, (check your tv listings) but you can also catch these 2 episodes here. You can catch different episodes at this link:

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/b...n-america/

Full Episode: Haiti & the Dominican Republic: An Island Divided

The first episode of the Black in Latin America series explores race and identity in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Full Episode: Cuba: The Next Revolution

In Black in Latin America's second episode, Professor Gates explores race and identity in Cuba.

[Edited 2/26/12 18:20pm]

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #87 posted 02/27/12 3:04pm

HotGritz

I've never heard of him either. This is wonderful, thankyou for sharing. mushy He is soooo handsome and distinguished looking.

2elijah said:

noimageatall said:

I remember this man... love

Male model Renauld White revolutionized the industry by demanding equal representation in mainstream publications. In November 1979, White was the first African-American model to appear on the cover of GQ magazine (a fact oft overlooked as the first black man to cover GQ was Swiss born Urs Althaus in 1977).

According to White, he got his start when he came to New York from nearby New Jersey one day to demand that agents at Wilhemina models allow more people of color the chance to compete in the industry. He said, “I wanted to bring about change. I really confronted the establishment about why there were not more black male images. At first I thought I was going to get thrown in jail and beaten up because of my approach. But then they realized that they were wrong and that they were behind society and behind the times, and that they had to listen to me.”

“They offered me a contract because they thought that I would fail. Eventually I proved myself.” White went on to not only cover GQ, but also score major campaigns with Black Tie cologne, Vitalis, and Arrows Shirts. He was the first black man to work the runways for Bill Blass, Calvin Klein, Donna Karan, and Ralph Lauren. He also enjoyed success in Europe, where he walked for Yves Saint Laurent, Jean Charles de Castelbajac, Cerutti, Valentino, Armani, and Versace.

White later transitioned into the world of theater. He appeared on the soap opera “The Guiding Light,” for many years and now participates in several plays.


Wow thanks. I don't think I've ever heard of him. He looks like one of my younger sister's ex-boyfriends. Thanks fof the info. Interesting.

I'M NOT SAYING YOU'RE UGLY. YOU JUST HAVE BAD LUCK WHEN IT COMES TO MIRRORS AND SUNLIGHT!
RIP Dick Clark, Whitney Houston, Don Cornelius, Heavy D, and Donna Summer. rose
Reply #88 posted 02/29/12 4:16am

noimageatall

Leap Year! woot!

love

Isha Sesay

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Friday, February 24, 2012

Isha Sesay is a British journalist of Sierra Leonean descent, and an anchor for CNN International. Based at the network's world headquarters in Atlanta, she anchors the program BackStory. On January 17, 2011, Sesay debuted on Anderson Cooper 360° as the new permanent presenter of the 360 Bulletin.

After graduating, Sesay began her television career as a researcher for the BBC talk show Kilroy, initially as an unpaid volunteer but later as a full-time paid employee. In 1998 she moved to Glasgow to work for BBC Scotland, and after a period behind the camera got her first job as a TV presenter on BBC Choice. She went on to present a variety of programmes for the BBC, CNN, and TWI, before joining Sky in March 2002.

In November 2005, Sesay became a news anchor at CNN International, based at the network's global headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. She travelled to Nigeria in April 2007 to cover that country's presidential election, where she conducted one-on-one interviews with both outgoing president Olusegun Obasanjo, and the newly elected president Umaru Yar'Adua. Later that year, she was in South Africa to cover the launch of the Global Elders.

Wayne Sutton

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Saturday, February 25, 2012

Wayne Sutton is an entrepreneur, advisor and technology journalist.

Wayne helps individuals, startups and businesses succeed in understanding how to communicate on the social web via web development, user experience, brand strategy and marketing (Mobile and Social). With 10 plus years of experience in internet technology, he has provided counsel to business leaders ranging from founders of small startups and representatives of nonprofit organizations to CEOs of large and small corporations.

Wayne has been featured on CNN.com, BBC, Mashable, BlackEnterprise.com, Web Pro news, The Atlanta Post and various media outlets. His blog SocialWayne.com has been ranked one of the 50 best technology and social media blogs in the world by Evan Carmichael and Simply Zesty.

Recently Wayne helped co-launch the NewMe Accelerator, the first minority led startup accelerator/incubator in Silicon Valley which was featured in CNN Black in America 4 documentary that aired November 13, 2011.

I heart this man!!!!

Melvin Van Peebles

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Sunday, February 26, 2012

He is most famous for creating the acclaimed film, Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song, which heralded a new era of African American focused films. He is the father of actor and director Mario Van Peebles.

Van Peebles began writing about his experiences as a cable car driver. What evolved from an initially small article and a series of photographs was Van Peebles' first book, The Big Heart.

One day, a passenger suggested that Van Peebles should become a filmmaker. He shot his first short film, Pickup Men for Herrick, in 1957. He made two more short films during the same period.

He published four novels and one story collection in French and made another short film, Cinq cent balles (1965). It was here that he made his first feature length film, The Story of a Three-Day Pass (La Permission) (1968), which caught the attention of Hollywood producers who mistook him for a French auteur. His first Hollywood film was the 1970 Columbia Pictures comedy Watermelon Man, written by Herman Raucher. The movie told the story of a casually racist white man who suddenly wakes up black and finds himself alienated from his friends, family and job. In 1970 Van Peebles was also to direct filming of the Powder Ridge Rock Festival, which was banned by court injunction.

Gladys Gary Vaughn

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Monday, February 27, 2012

A recognized expert in family and social science, Gladys Gary Vaughn has forged a 30-year career in helping people improve the quality of their lives. "I've always believed in social justice. It is a deeply held belief of mine," she told Contemporary Black Biography (CBB). To that end, she has spoken before Congress and on the talk show Geraldo. She has published scholarly papers, appeared at international seminars, and been quoted in The New York Times. More importantly, her expertise has guided policies and programs that have positively affected thousands throughout the world.

Emil Wilbekin

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Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Emil Wilbekin is currently the Editor-in-Chief of “GIANT” magazine. At “GIANT,” he oversees the bi-monthly publication, synchronizes the magazine with the website (www.giantmag.com ), and develops the overall growth of the GIANT brand.

Wilbekin is best known for his 12-year tenure at “Vibe” magazine, where he served as Editor-in-Chief from 1999 to 2004. Under Wilbekin’s leadership, “Vibe” won the National Magazine Award for General Excellence in 2002. In 2004, Wilbekin became Editorial Director/Vice President of Brand Development for Vibe Ventures where he was an executive producer for the 1st Annual “Vibe Awards,” oversaw ancillary brand extensions such as digital, books, and TV.

She is gorgeous and brilliant!!!!

Isabel Wilkerson

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Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Isabel Wilkerson, who spent most of her career as a national correspondent and bureau chief at The New York Times, is the first black woman to win a Pulitzer Prize in the history of American journalism and was the first black American to win for individual reporting. Inspired by her own parents’ migration, she devoted fifteen years to the research and writing of this book. She interviewed more than 1,200 people, unearthed archival works and gathered the voices of the famous and the unknown to tell the epic story of the relocation of an entire people in The Warmth of Other Suns.

More about her book... http://isabelwilkerson.com/

National Book Critics Circle Award Winner
A New York Times Top 10 Best Book of the Year

From World War I to the 1970s, some six million black Americans fled the American South for an uncertain existence in the urban North and West. They left all they knew and took a leap of faith that they might find freedom under the Warmth of Other Suns.

“The Warmth of Other Suns is a sweeping and yet deeply personal tale of America’s hidden 20th century history – the long and difficult trek of Southern blacks to the northern and western cities. This is an epic for all Americans who want to understand the making of our modern nation.”

—TOM BROKAW

[Edited 2/29/12 4:20am]

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #89 posted 02/29/12 6:22am

free2bfreeda

George Gibbs Jr. is the first black man to arrive at Antarctica, also known as the South Pole.

Getting a start in exploration through the U.S. Navy, the Jacksonville, Florida native served in World War II as a gunner. In 1939, Gibbs joined Admiral Richard Byrd on a South Pole expedition that would be completed in 1941. Gibbs was the first and only African-American in a group of 40 sailors aboard the USS Bear. On Jan. 14, 1941, the men reached their destination.

Gibbs would continue to serve the Navy for a total of 24 years before retiring in 1959. After taking work in personnel at IBM and starting his own employment agency, Gibbs turned his attention toward civil rights and would organize the Rochester, Minnesota chapter of the NAACP in 1966. A few years later, he would be honored with a chapter humanitarian award in his own name for outstanding work.

In his efforts to push integration in his community, Gibbs applied to the Rochester Elks club, an all-white private club. He was the first applicant and, of course, was denied. But his denial made headlines, and he helped to break the tradition of segregation at the prestigious organization.

Since Gibbs' passing on Nov. 7, 2001 - his 85th birthday, the city of Rochester has opened the George Gibbs Elementary School and dedicated Rochester's West Soldiers Field Drive in his honor.

The truth is often a terrible weapon of aggression. “Those who are capable of tyranny and injustice are capable of perjury to sustain it.”
Reply #90 posted 02/29/12 8:17am

2elijah

^ Freeda that is very interesting, because I never knew that.

That article has prompted me to post this one. Even though Robert Peary tried to rob Henson of being the first man to reach the North Pole, in the end, before Matthew Henson died, the Explorers' club recognized Henson as the true explorer of the North Pole, and President Eisenhower presented him with an award and acknowledging him as the "true discoverer of the North Pole."

MATTHEW HENSON

http://www.unmuseum.org/henson.htm

[Edited 3/3/12 16:52pm]

G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #91 posted 02/29/12 7:46pm

2elijah

This was the best Black History thread thus far, that stayed respectful through
this entire month of February more than any other year it has been posted
in this forum. Thanks to everyone who contributed information to this thread
and kept it positive. biggrin
[Edited 2/29/12 19:52pm]
G. Giffords-a congresswoman was shot in the head by an 'armed' gunman-the police didn't kill her shooter. 'Unarmed' Michael Brown struggled w/a cop, runs away, surrenders and gets killed execution style by a cop. Justice for all? Go figure.
Reply #92 posted 03/01/12 4:57am

smoothcriminal12

2elijah said:

This was the best Black History thread thus far, that stayed respectful through this entire month of February more than any other year it has been posted in this forum. Thanks to everyone who contributed information to this thread and kept it positive. biggrin [Edited 2/29/12 19:52pm]

I liked how it stayed informative. Lots of interesting facts in here that'll be good in the future.

My new album is available HERE: http://itunes.apple.com/a...mpt=uo%3D1
Reply #93 posted 03/01/12 8:20pm

free2bfreeda

smoothcriminal12 said:

2elijah said:

This was the best Black History thread thus far, that stayed respectful through this entire month of February more than any other year it has been posted in this forum. Thanks to everyone who contributed information to this thread and kept it positive. biggrin [Edited 2/29/12 19:52pm] highfive

I liked how it stayed informative. Lots of interesting facts in here that'll be good in the future.

yeahthat 2elijah. nod me too smoothcriminal12.

The truth is often a terrible weapon of aggression. “Those who are capable of tyranny and injustice are capable of perjury to sustain it.”
Reply #94 posted 03/01/12 9:01pm

noimageatall

2elijah said:

This was the best Black History thread thus far, that stayed respectful through this entire month of February more than any other year it has been posted in this forum. Thanks to everyone who contributed information to this thread and kept it positive. biggrin [Edited 2/29/12 19:52pm]

I agree...just wish there'd been more posters. confused

93 posts and

2,466 views

"Let love be your perfect weapon..." ~~Andy Biersack
Reply #95 posted 03/20/12 12:15am

henrylarry6

Black History Month is such a great way to honor certain individuals who have helped shape the world we live in today. For Black History Month in Massachusetts there are events honoring Black History Month such as the African American Patriots Tour and the Roxbury Black History Trolley Tour.

URL: http://prince.org/msg/105/375331

Date printed: Tue 2nd Sep 2014 7:00am PDT