independent and unofficial
Prince fan community site
Tue 23rd May 2017 7:53am
Welcome! Sign up or enter username and password to remember me
Forum jump
Forums > General Discussion > The Best Television Series In The History Of Television?
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Page 1 of 4 1234>
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
Author

Tweet     Share

Message
Thread started 05/04/17 11:35pm

CynicKill

The Best Television Series In The History Of Television?

Back in 1982 Brideshead Revisited took the nation by storm with its obsessively detailed sophistocated british snobbery. The watercooler was buzzing and the fashions were being copied. Even Sebastian's teddy bear became an accessory. With years of production and seemingly no expense spared, it became televison's first high-brow smash.

What do you think of Brideshead?

>

The famous lunch scene:

>

Inside the Making of Brideshead Revisited, the Original British TV Obsession

Michael Lindsay-Hogg, the show’s original director, recalls the epic achievement of the 11-part series based on the Evelyn Waugh novel.

November 4, 2016 8:00 am

Photograph by Michael Roberts.

Arcadia Again Charles Sturridge, Jeremy Irons, Diana Quick, Michael Lindsay-Hogg, Derek Granger, Simon Jones, Anthony Andrews, Phoebe Nicholls, John Grillo, Jane Asher, and Nickolas Grace, photographed in the Great Hall of Castle Howard, in North Yorkshire, England.

In the late summer of 1978, Derek Gran­ger asked me if I’d like to come over for a drink. We sat in his pretty back garden and chatted, idly at first. I was doing well as a director of dramas in what was a high point of British television. Derek and I had first gotten to know each other on a four-hour train ride from Manchester to London 20 years earlier. I was working as a trainee floor manager for Granada Television before going up to Oxford, and Derek had just joined the company—first as a researcher, eventually becoming head of drama—after an admired run as theater critic for the Financial Times.

“Look,” he said suddenly, “Evelyn Waugh. Brideshead Revisited. Have you ever read it?”

“Yes. It’s my favorite novel. I read it first when I was 17.”

“Well, the thing is, Granada’s going to do it for television. I’m producing. Do you want to direct it?”

I felt, as if from the balmy summer sky, flowers—colorful, sweet-smelling—were floating toward my head.

Then began eight months of casting, costuming, junking scripts by an eminent adapter that had gone in the wrong direction, starting again, going back to the novel, and putting in what turned out to be the crucial element—the voice-over by Charles Ryder. Jeremy Irons, who, up to then, was best known for a featured role in a British TV series called Love for Lydia, would play Charles. Anthony Andrews, who scored a success in Danger UXB, about a World War II bomb-disposal expert, would play his great friend, Lord Sebastian Flyte.

Jeremy, Anthony, and I would take an early-morning train from London for the still-four-hour trip to Manchester. The three of us would have a full English breakfast, and then Jeremy would light his pipe, and I my cigar, and he and Anthony would each have a miniature of whiskey to fortify themselves to deal with the rigors of starting to rehearse a massive, not fully cast production, one that did not yet have a finished script. Each day was filled with hard work, crises, decisions we would not know the results of for perhaps months to come, jokes, and a growing sense of intimacy and friendship. And always there was Derek Granger, our indefatigable, extraordinary producer, involved in all major decisions, as funny as you’d wish anyone to be: resolute, alert to nuance, quick to seize opportunity.

Malta and the nearby island of Gozo were where we started, in April 1979, to film Charles going to tell the drunken Sebastian that his mother is mortally ill in England. Jeremy arrived, having had his naturally fairish hair dyed brown. We’d asked Anthony to dye his own dark hair blond. When he showed up in Malta, he was wearing a tweed cap, giving an odd, squire-ish look to someone who favored white jeans.

brideshead-film-reunited-cast-02.png

Left, Andrews, Laurence Olivier, and Irons; Right, Andrews (with Aloysius) and Irons.

Both from ITV/Rex/Shutterstock.

“Cool cap, Tone,” I said.

“We have a problem,” he said.

“Oh?”

“I sat in the garden at home on Sunday. It was such a nice day.”

“So?”

“It wasn’t a good idea.”

With some chagrin, he took off his cap. His hair had turned an interesting shade of green.

We shot for four months all over the North of England—Oxford too—including interiors, exteriors, summer scenes at Castle Howard, which Derek and I had chosen as Brideshead, the great domed palace of the doomed Flyte family. And then came the strike. On August 10, the technical unions shut down all British independent television productions. The strike would last until the end of October. Our schedule, which called for the completion of all principal photography by December, was blown to smithereens.

I had a contracted movie I was supposed to do in spring 1980. I couldn’t get out of the contract and could not continue as director of Brideshead Revisited. No need to say how I felt. Charles Sturridge, just 28 and thrown in at the deep end, took over and, for more than a year, did fabulous and beautiful work, both with the actors and the camera, to complete the 11-part series, which premiered in October of 1981.

Brideshead Revisited became a watershed in British and American television. It was broadcast on PBS beginning in January 1982 and was described as “the biggest British invasion since the Beatles.” The series was a precursor to the wonderful Merchant Ivory films of the 1980s and, later, to Downton Abbey. But, grounded in Waugh’s greatest novel, Brideshead Revisited was concerned not with costumed nostalgia or cliff-hangers or audience-grabbing surprises but with how life changes, how the dreams of youth alter and, in time, become a sterner reality.

The actors—Jeremy, Anthony, Diana Quick, Jane Asher, Phoebe Nicholls, Claire Bloom, Nickolas Grace, Simon Jones, John Grillo—were, if I can put it this way, mine and Derek’s. We chose them all. They were our team. The older actors—Laurence Olivier, John Gielgud, Mona Washbourne—anyone would have chosen. Casting actors is like choosing a family and, if it works, an ideal family. This one worked.

Dissolve. Thirty-five years later.

My wife, Lisa, and I were taking a car from York station to Castle Howard. North Yorkshire is a beautiful part of England—majestic, abundant, with endless farmland, harvested hay rolled up in bales, copses untouched for 300 years, a tarmac road called the Stray, perfectly straight. The cabdriver said it had been laid out by the Romans. And the late-afternoon sun blessing the fields, golden on green. But autumn was in the air, something poignant to it. As I felt, perhaps, our Brideshead Revisited reunion might be.

brideshead-film-reunited-cast-03.jpg

Stéphane Audran, Irons, Sturridge, Mike Lemmon (with camera), Andrews, and Chris Atkinson, with gondoliers, in Venice, 1980.

Our actors, when it all started, mostly ranged in age from their early 20s to mid-30s. Now they are men and women in their late 50s to early 70s. And Derek, with all his marbles and wit, is 95. He remarked that getting everyone together after all these years might be “rather like herding a group of feral cats in the middle of a thunderstorm.” But we met for a dinner, hosted by Nicholas Howard and his elegant wife, Victoria, the present custodians of Castle Howard, in the grand dining room of the castle—the most notable, beautiful, enormous, but harmonious house of its kind in England, started in 1699 by Sir John Vanbrugh, architect and playwright both. “I’d like to give a toast,” Nick Howard said, rising and raising his glass, “to the then and the now. What was and what is.”

I sat next to Jane Asher, as intelligent and beautiful as when I’d first met her, in a TV play I’d directed in 1968, and on whom I’d always had a crush. She played Celia, Charles Ryder’s abandoned wife. She is married, with three children, to Gerald Scarfe, the singular artist of the pen, whose caricatures are both a cruel distortion of his subjects and dead-on accurate. Opposite, John Grillo, reserved and observant, wonderfully oleaginous as Mr. Samgrass, was next to Diana Quick, who played Lady Julia Flyte, Sebastian’s sister and Charles’s great lost love, with a strength that was both tender and tragic. Beside her was Derek and next to him the wonderful Phoebe Nicholls, whom I’d discovered when she was 18, put in a play, and then cast as Cordelia, the youngest Flyte. (Phoebe and Charles Sturridge married, and one of their three children is the successful young actor Tom Sturridge.) The food and wine were good and the conversation free-­flowing, spurred on by our wits, Nickolas Grace (Anthony Blanche) and Simon Jones (Bridey). After dinner, we all repaired to the Great Hall for coffee and Cognac and more talk, with some attention given to the new Evelyn Waugh biography, by Philip Eade. We also thought of our colleagues Charles Keating (Rex Mottram) and Jeremy Sinden (Boy Mulcaster), wonderful actors both, taken from the world too young.

Anthony Andrews, suave, funny, and handsome, came the next morning, having taken an eight A.M. train from London. In “real life,” Anthony, unlike his BAFTA-award-winning Sebastian, is crisp and direct. You could see him running a multi-national company by day and appearing in a West End play in the evening. “How’s it going? Well I hope,” he said. Jeremy Irons arrived with his wife, Sinéad Cusack, and his dog, Smudge, accompanied by Charles Sturridge. For whatever reasons, Jeremy does look like a movie star, artlessly so, the way the overcoat with velvet collar sits on his broad shoulders, his well-scuffed walking boots, his eyes, both kind and assessing. He and I sat in a window seat of the great house, where we had spent a summer 36 years before. It was his birthday.

“How old?” I asked.

“Sixty-eight,” he said. You’re kidding, I thought, and said it. He’d barely been 30 when we’d first met.

“Just another step on the staircase,” Jeremy said. He looked at me and held the look a moment, then smiled without rue and began to occupy himself with rolling a cigarette, as is his custom.

And so there we were again, most of us, anyway, together, as we had been at the beginning, making jokes, trading memories, but now with different numbers attached to our names: 58, 65, 68, 76, 95.

Just another step on the staircase.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #1 posted 05/05/17 8:43am

purplethunder3
121

avatar

Loved it. Watched it every time it came on PBS. I even bought the boxset. But then I'm a sucker for historical dramatic mini-series going back to the 70s. razz lol The Captains and the Kings, Shogun, Roots, The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, and so on. But the best British television series of that kind is still Upstairs, Downstairs. Got that boxset, too.

[Edited 5/5/17 8:46am]

nothing's forbidden... and nothing's taboo.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #2 posted 05/05/17 8:45am

XxAxX

avatar

It was great, no doubt, but for me the best series ever was either X Files or Buffy the Vampire Slayer
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #3 posted 05/05/17 10:17am

CynicKill

I've never seen Upstairs, Downstairs, even when people were comparing Downton Abbey to it.

I feel Brideshead will be hard to beat in its genre, and will never happen again, mainly becaue no one is ambitious enough to be so literary, or brave enough to be so slow.

As for my best; I'm really influenced by:

Maybe the greatest in its genre!

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #4 posted 05/05/17 10:39am

RodeoSchro

avatar

There is no "best". There is your favorite. My favorites are:

Married...with Children
Seinfeld
Magnum, P. I.

Second Funkiest White Man in America

Cowardice always hides behind insinuation
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #5 posted 05/05/17 10:43am

CynicKill

RodeoSchro said:

There is no "best". There is your favorite. My favorites are:

Married...with Children
Seinfeld
Magnum, P. I.

>

I'm prone to hyperbolic titles, plus I was quoting one or two critics who've actually said that about Brideshead. Have you seen it? Where does it rank with you?

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #6 posted 05/05/17 6:48pm

2045RadicalMat
tZ

RodeoSchro said:

There is no "best". There is your favorite. My favorites are:

Married...with Children
Seinfeld
Magnum, P. I.


Hear hear.

Favorites:
The Twilight Zone
The Prisoner
The Fugitive
Route 66
The Simpsons (seasons 1-13; it's seen a resurgence with Dave Mirkin returning lately)
Eerie Indiana (c'mon i was a kid watching this it was great)
Get a Life (Mirkin/Chris Elliott)
Eagleheart (*season 2 in particular)
Rick and Morty
Seinfeld/Curb Your Enthusiasm
The Golden Girls
CHEERS


I'll make sure i watch this European show on YouTube sometime soon.

I also loved early episodes of COMBAT! same goes for I LOVE LUCY. ...early episodes
"Damn Dolores, pick another subject, please..."
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #7 posted 05/05/17 7:42pm

Hudson

avatar

No one here likes any of my favorites, weird. 1. Supermarket Sweep 2. Divorce Court 3. Teen Mom 2 4. The Smurfs 5. That's So Raven 6. Two and a Half Men 7. The Talk 8. The Jenny Jones Show 9. Double Dare 10. Bananas in Pajamas
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #8 posted 05/05/17 8:03pm

purplethunder3
121

avatar

Hudson said:

No one here likes any of my favorites, weird. 1. Supermarket Sweep 2. Divorce Court 3. Teen Mom 2 4. The Smurfs 5. That's So Raven 6. Two and a Half Men 7. The Talk 8. The Jenny Jones Show 9. Double Dare 10. Bananas in Pajamas

lol Which Divorce Court? The one with Judge Maybelline?

nothing's forbidden... and nothing's taboo.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #9 posted 05/05/17 8:11pm

CynicKill

Hudson said:

No one here likes any of my favorites, weird. 1. Supermarket Sweep 2. Divorce Court 3. Teen Mom 2 4. The Smurfs 5. That's So Raven 6. Two and a Half Men 7. The Talk 8. The Jenny Jones Show 9. Double Dare 10. Bananas in Pajamas

>

I'll give you "That's So Raven".

Raven is a comic genius, and when Saturday Night Live was looking for black female representation I always wondered why she was never considered. But since she doesn't consider herself black, mystery solved.

It hurt though that the person they picked isn't funny in the slightest.

The Smurfs was my ish when I was a kid, but I can't push myself to watch it now.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #10 posted 05/05/17 8:11pm

Hudson

avatar

purplethunder3121 said:

Hudson said:

No one here likes any of my favorites, weird. 1. Supermarket Sweep 2. Divorce Court 3. Teen Mom 2 4. The Smurfs 5. That's So Raven 6. Two and a Half Men 7. The Talk 8. The Jenny Jones Show 9. Double Dare 10. Bananas in Pajamas

lol Which Divorce Court? The one with Judge Maybelline?



Maybelline was more fun and Lynn's more of a role model/humanitarian. Both are great.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #11 posted 05/05/17 8:15pm

Hudson

avatar

CynicKill said:

Hudson said:

No one here likes any of my favorites, weird. 1. Supermarket Sweep 2. Divorce Court 3. Teen Mom 2 4. The Smurfs 5. That's So Raven 6. Two and a Half Men 7. The Talk 8. The Jenny Jones Show 9. Double Dare 10. Bananas in Pajamas

>

I'll give you "That's So Raven".

Raven is a comic genius, and when Saturday Night Live was looking for black female representation I always wondered why she was never considered. But since she doesn't consider herself black, mystery solved.

It hurt though that the person they picked isn't funny in the slightest.

The Smurfs was my ish when I was a kid, but I can't push myself to watch it now.



Disney's making a sequel series called Raven's Home. yay





 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #12 posted 05/05/17 8:19pm

purplethunder3
121

avatar

Hudson said:

purplethunder3121 said:

lol Which Divorce Court? The one with Judge Maybelline?



Maybelline was more fun and Lynn's more of a role model/humanitarian. Both are great.

Judge Mablean has another court show on now called "Justice With Judge Mablean," dealing with small claims cases. She still gets fiesty with the claimants sometimes. I spelled her name right this time. lol I used to watch Divorce Court back in the day.

nothing's forbidden... and nothing's taboo.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #13 posted 05/06/17 3:55am

EmmaMcG

Best TV shows of all time:

The Sopranos
The Wire
Deadwood


In that order.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #14 posted 05/06/17 12:07pm

NorthC

Bring'em Back Alive about big game hunter Frank Buck was one of my favorites as a child because I loved (and still love) wild animals and exotic places.
British comedies are also great:
Monty Python
Blackadder
Coupling
Even the President of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #15 posted 05/06/17 12:18pm

NorthC

EmmaMcG said:

Best TV shows of all time:

The Sopranos
The Wire
Deadwood


In that order.

What do you like so much about Deadwood? I like westerns, but I just couldn't get into this one. Ian McShane as the likeable bad guy was pretty great, but I found the storylines confusing. I could never figure out what was going on.
Another TV series that I liked was MASH, where colonel Potter introduced a film by saying: "It's got everything a good film needs: horses, horses and horses. As you have guessed, it's a western."
That's the kind of western I like and that's what I missed in Deadwood.
But please, tell me why you like it!
Even the President of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #16 posted 05/06/17 12:24pm

NorthC

Hudson said:

No one here likes any of my favorites, weird.

1. Supermarket Sweep
2. Divorce Court
3. Teen Mom 2
4. The Smurfs
5. That's So Raven
6. Two and a Half Men
7. The Talk
8. The Jenny Jones Show
9. Double Dare
10. Bananas in Pajamas

I used to smurf the Smurfs all the time when I was a kid!
Even the President of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #17 posted 05/06/17 12:34pm

kpowers

avatar

EmmaMcG said:

Best TV shows of all time: The Sopranos The Wire Deadwood In that order.

hmph!

Image result for batman animated series

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #18 posted 05/06/17 12:51pm

EmmaMcG

NorthC said:

EmmaMcG said:

Best TV shows of all time:

The Sopranos
The Wire
Deadwood


In that order.

What do you like so much about Deadwood? I like westerns, but I just couldn't get into this one. Ian McShane as the likeable bad guy was pretty great, but I found the storylines confusing. I could never figure out what was going on.
Another TV series that I liked was MASH, where colonel Potter introduced a film by saying: "It's got everything a good film needs: horses, horses and horses. As you have guessed, it's a western."
That's the kind of western I like and that's what I missed in Deadwood.
But please, tell me why you like it!


I never found the story to be difficult to follow. Is it possible you might have maybe watched it out of order or missed an episode along the way? I always felt it to be pretty straight forward. Maybe if you gave it another chance you might feel differently?

I love the characters, the story, the dialogue. Everything. There were no real "good guys" or "bad guys". Even Ian McShane's character, which is often mislabled as "the villain" wasn't really a villain. He did what he did for the good of the town. Sometimes that was within the law, sometimes it wasn't. The show was full of complex characters that had their own motivations that went beyond the typical "hero" and "villain" aspect. Maybe it's because the show is historical rather than fictional (for the most part).

Not to mention that Timothy Olyphant is in it. I'd seriously watch ANYTHING with him in it. I even went to see Die Hard 4 in the cinema, knowing that the movie would be shit, just because he was in it. The draw of Timothy Olyphant should never be underestimated.
He's also in Justified, which is another show that I would personally rank in the top 10 of all time. If you've never heard of it, it's kind of like a TV series of Dirty Harry. With Walton Goggins as a Nazi maniac.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #19 posted 05/06/17 12:53pm

EmmaMcG

kpowers said:



EmmaMcG said:


Best TV shows of all time: The Sopranos The Wire Deadwood In that order.

hmph!


Image result for batman animated series



Batman would have to settle for a place in the top 10, along with Firefly, Justified, Twin Peaks and Seinfeld.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #20 posted 05/06/17 12:54pm

NorthC

Okay, thanks for the explanation, Em. I don't remember if I missed episodes of Deadwood, but yes, Twin Peaks was also great. I never cared for it until I saw some David Lynch movies and then got the DVD of the series cheaply, so I could watch everything in a row. So yes, maybe sometimes you should give something a second chance!
[Edited 5/6/17 13:17pm]
[Edited 5/6/17 13:19pm]
Even the President of the United States sometimes must have to stand naked.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #21 posted 05/06/17 2:54pm

214

EmmaMcG said:

kpowers said:

hmph!

Image result for batman animated series

Batman would have to settle for a place in the top 10, along with Firefly, Justified, Twin Peaks and Seinfeld.

The 90's one? if it's so it certainly is one of the greatest of all time, the same with Spider -Man

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #22 posted 05/06/17 3:02pm

EmmaMcG

NorthC said:

Okay, thanks for the explanation, Em. I don't remember if I missed episodes of Deadwood, but yes, Twin Peaks was also great. I never cared for it until I saw some David Lynch movies and then got the DVD of the series cheaply, so I could watch everything in a row. So yes, maybe sometimes you should give something a second chance!
[Edited 5/6/17 13:17pm]
[Edited 5/6/17 13:19pm]


There's been a few things I've dismissed at first but got a new respect for after I gave it a second chance. Twin Peaks and the x files being just two. So yeah, give Deadwood another go. At the very least, it's a chance to bask in the glory that is Timothy Olyphant. Though he may not have the same effect on you that he has on me. smile
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #23 posted 05/06/17 3:04pm

EmmaMcG

214 said:



EmmaMcG said:


kpowers said:


hmph!


Image result for batman animated series



Batman would have to settle for a place in the top 10, along with Firefly, Justified, Twin Peaks and Seinfeld.

The 90's one? if it's so it certainly is one of the greatest of all time, the same with Spider -Man



The animated series of Batman from the 90's is not only the greatest animated show of all time, it's also the absolute best depiction of Batman (and all associated characters) there's ever been.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #24 posted 05/06/17 3:36pm

214

EmmaMcG said:

214 said:

The 90's one? if it's so it certainly is one of the greatest of all time, the same with Spider -Man

The animated series of Batman from the 90's is not only the greatest animated show of all time, it's also the absolute best depiction of Batman (and all associated characters) there's ever been.

Certainly is. Downton Abbey is another great one.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #25 posted 05/06/17 4:19pm

purplethunder3
121

avatar

214 said:

EmmaMcG said:

214 said: The animated series of Batman from the 90's is not only the greatest animated show of all time, it's also the absolute best depiction of Batman (and all associated characters) there's ever been.

Certainly is. Downton Abbey is another great one.

If you like Downton Abbey then you must watch Upstairs, Downstairs, which inspired it.

nothing's forbidden... and nothing's taboo.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #26 posted 05/06/17 4:44pm

XxAxX

avatar

purplethunder3121 said:

214 said:

Certainly is. Downton Abbey is another great one.

If you like Downton Abbey then you must watch Upstairs, Downstairs, which inspired it.



you make a good point British TV does some great stuff. what you said above about those series and imo add in Luther and Sherlock

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #27 posted 05/06/17 4:51pm

purplethunder3
121

avatar

XxAxX said:

purplethunder3121 said:

If you like Downton Abbey then you must watch Upstairs, Downstairs, which inspired it.



you make a good point British TV does some great stuff. what you said above about those series and imo add in Luther and Sherlock

Yup, the last season of Sherlock was over the top. Luther is an excellent series, too--can't go wrong with Idris Elba as the star.

nothing's forbidden... and nothing's taboo.
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #28 posted 05/06/17 5:44pm

PennyPurple

avatar

Game of Thrones.

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #29 posted 05/06/17 6:04pm

XxAxX

avatar

purplethunder3121 said:

XxAxX said:



you make a good point British TV does some great stuff. what you said above about those series and imo add in Luther and Sherlock

Yup, the last season of Sherlock was over the top. Luther is an excellent series, too--can't go wrong with Idris Elba as the star.

nod he's totally disco, tickety boo!

 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Page 1 of 4 1234>
Reply   New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Forums > General Discussion > The Best Television Series In The History Of Television?