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Reply #30 posted 02/02/14 1:38pm

purplethunder3
121

avatar

eek sad

I guess U know me well, I don't like winter
But I seem 2 get a kick out of doing U cold
Oh, what the hell, U always surrender...
What's this strange relationship that we hold on 2?!!!
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Reply #31 posted 02/02/14 1:39pm

babynoz

avatar

JoeBala said:

I just saw this. I'm in shock. First saw him in Boogie Nights and been a fan since then, so young DAMN. What a talented guy. sad RIP Bro.

.

http://media.cineblog.it/6/6df/PHILIP-SEYMOUR-HOFFMAN-594x350.jpg

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http://filmnezes.hu/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/philip-seymour-hoffman-5.jpg

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http://www.top10de.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Philip-Seymour-Hoffman-como-Truman-Capote.jpg

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http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-gFwMKLv-wLA/To4B0a4gUfI/AAAAAAAAAWM/l9NfZlpnuSI/s1600/phillip.jpg

Wife Mimi O'Donnell and children sad

http://www.mtv.com/movies/photos/o/oscars06/red_carpet/hoffman_wife.jpg

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http://www-hollybaby-com.vimg.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/092110_philip_seymour_hoffman_spl85155_005.jpg



Thanks for the pics because I didn't recognize him by name.

May he RIP.

"Information is abundant, but wisdom is scarce."
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Reply #32 posted 02/02/14 1:39pm

BobGeorge909

avatar

lazycrockett said:

Ugh....Don't Do Heroin people. No one survives it.


While it does kill many. LOTSA of people do a heroin stretch and survive. Don't over dramatize.
Damn. 750,000 people died fighting the civil war...4 years. With Today's population %age, it would b 7 million people. There r 3000 railroad ties per a mile of track. It would take 250 miles of track to represent 750k...to put it in a bit of perspec
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Reply #33 posted 02/02/14 2:06pm

Timmy84

sad wilted pray angel

RIP to a very talented actor.

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Reply #34 posted 02/02/14 5:13pm

HuMpThAnG

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rose

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Reply #35 posted 02/02/14 5:21pm

RodeoSchro

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Anyone that tries drugs is a moron. No argument, no exceptions.

Second Funkiest White Man in America

Rocket Frog
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Reply #36 posted 02/02/14 8:18pm

JoeBala

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Musicians Mourn Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, Dead at 46

By Kevin Rutherford | February 02, 2014 4:20 PM EST

Philip Seymour Hoffman

Philip Seymour Hoffman attends the 'Hunger Games: Catching Fire' New York Premiere at AMC Lincoln Square Theater on November 20, 2013 in New York City.

Jamie McCarthy, FilmMagic

Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman has died. He was 46.

According to the The Hollywood Reporter, the actor was found dead in a New York apartment of an apparent drug overdose. He was found with a syringe in his left forearm, with two envelopes nearby that police say appear to have been filled with heroin.

"We are devastated by the loss of our beloved Phil and appreciate the outpouring of love and support we have received from everyone," read a statement from Hoffman's family. "This is a tragic and sudden loss, and we ask that you respect our privacy during this time of grieving. Please keep Phil in your thoughts and prayers."

Hoffman may have been best known in the music world for a star-making performance as rock critic Lester Bangs in the 2000 Cameron Crowe film "Almost Famous." In the film, Bangs takes under his wing a young William Miller, a budding journalist.

"That's because we're uncool," Hoffman says in the film of music writers. "And while women will always be a problem for us, most of the great art in the world is about that very same problem. Good-looking people don't have any spine. Their art never lasts. They get the girls, but we're smarter."

As the Oregonian points out, Hoffman was also a key player in 2009's "Pirate Radio," known as "The Boat That Rocked" outside of North America. He portrayed The Count, the pirate radio station's American DJ who was based on BBC Radio 1's Emperor Rosko.

The news of Hoffman's death come 35 years to the day that Sid Vicious, bassist of the Sex Pistols, died. Though Hoffman's cause of death has not yet been verified by medical examiners, the duo may share the same end; Vicious died of a heroin overdose -- about five minutes' walk from where Hoffman was found.

Given Hoffman's high regard in both the film and music world, a number of musicians have reacted to the actor's death on Twitter since his passing.

Tweets: http://www.billboard.com/...ce=twitter

Just Music-No Categories-Enjoy It!
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Reply #37 posted 02/02/14 9:08pm

NDRU

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RodeoSchro said:

Anyone that tries drugs is a moron. No argument, no exceptions.

Thank you, Westboro Baptist Church

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Reply #38 posted 02/02/14 10:50pm

jon1967

avatar

sad
Mork calling orsen come in rock lobsteryes
Its hard to be a saint in the city, Merry xmas n have a safe new year
=\//-/=
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Reply #39 posted 02/03/14 4:13am

BobGeorge909

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RodeoSchro said:

Anyone that tries drugs is a moron. No argument, no exceptions.




Damn...didn't realize I'm a moron.


The presidents a moron too.


Leary's a moron



C.s. lewis is a moron.



My mammas a moron.


My pa is one too.


Prince is a moron.


Paul McCartney is a moron....john Lennon too!


Damn...
Damn. 750,000 people died fighting the civil war...4 years. With Today's population %age, it would b 7 million people. There r 3000 railroad ties per a mile of track. It would take 250 miles of track to represent 750k...to put it in a bit of perspec
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Reply #40 posted 02/03/14 4:28am

damosuzuki

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I always enjoyed watching him, even in movies that I’d otherwise have limited interest in seeing, and he was my favourite part of some movies that I really love…Happiness, Magnolia, Boogie Nights, Capote, Almost Famous.

[Edited 2/3/14 4:32am]

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Reply #41 posted 02/03/14 4:53am

dJJ

I'm still a bit schocked.


I loved him as an actor, he certaninly was on my top lists of actors. And I loved the films he chose. He never chose cheesy, sleeze scripts. He always picked great films.

I did not know anything about his drug habit. And that shocked me too.



rose

99% of my posts are ironic. Maybe this post sides with the other 1%.
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Reply #42 posted 02/03/14 5:52am

PurpleJedi

avatar

BobGeorge909 said:

RodeoSchro said:

Anyone that tries drugs is a moron. No argument, no exceptions.

Damn...didn't realize I'm a moron. The presidents a moron too. Leary's a moron C.s. lewis is a moron. My mammas a moron. My pa is one too. Prince is a moron. Paul McCartney is a moron....john Lennon too! Damn...


...does anyone still consider weed a "drug"?

wink

I will agree to the ammended statement; "Anyone who tries hardcore drugs is a moron".
nod It's 2014, we know the evils of coke, heroin, meth...we KNOW it kills...we KNOW it destroys families, careers, relationships...I don't understand why people still do it.

By St. Boogar and all the saints at the backside door of Purgatory!
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Reply #43 posted 02/03/14 6:05am

BobGeorge909

avatar

PurpleJedi said:



BobGeorge909 said:


RodeoSchro said:

Anyone that tries drugs is a moron. No argument, no exceptions.



Damn...didn't realize I'm a moron. The presidents a moron too. Leary's a moron C.s. lewis is a moron. My mammas a moron. My pa is one too. Prince is a moron. Paul McCartney is a moron....john Lennon too! Damn...


...does anyone still consider weed a "drug"?

wink

I will agree to the ammended statement; "Anyone who tries hardcore drugs is a moron".
nod It's 2014, we know the evils of coke, heroin, meth...we KNOW it kills...we KNOW it destroys families, careers, relationships...I don't understand why people still do it.


Death and destrusuction is not always the result of drug use....its just the only one u hear about. If death and destruction aren't the result...use not gonna hear about it. It sells by the billions in this country...and while it kills many....the deaths by no means match the sales repots.
Damn. 750,000 people died fighting the civil war...4 years. With Today's population %age, it would b 7 million people. There r 3000 railroad ties per a mile of track. It would take 250 miles of track to represent 750k...to put it in a bit of perspec
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Reply #44 posted 02/03/14 6:38am

PurpleJedi

avatar

BobGeorge909 said:

PurpleJedi said:


...does anyone still consider weed a "drug"?

wink

I will agree to the ammended statement; "Anyone who tries hardcore drugs is a moron".
nod It's 2014, we know the evils of coke, heroin, meth...we KNOW it kills...we KNOW it destroys families, careers, relationships...I don't understand why people still do it.

Death and destrusuction is not always the result of drug use....its just the only one u hear about. If death and destruction aren't the result...use not gonna hear about it. It sells by the billions in this country...and while it kills many....the deaths by no means match the sales repots.


I agree. It's a billion dollar industry. Millions of morons contributing to death & destruction not just here, but south of the border where all these drug dollars are funding cartels and kingpins wrecking havoc with the lives of untold millions of innocent people. America the beautiful & addicted. It's enough fodder for a thread of its own.

By St. Boogar and all the saints at the backside door of Purgatory!
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Reply #45 posted 02/03/14 7:22am

Hudson

avatar

tumblr_n0du1vbE0E1qf5hjqo1_500.gif



tumblr_n0du1vbE0E1qf5hjqo2_500.gif



tumblr_n0du1vbE0E1qf5hjqo3_500.gif

The point is conceded. Will you defer your motion to allow a commission to explore the validity of your accusations?
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Reply #46 posted 02/03/14 7:24am

Hudson

avatar

OnlyNDaUsa said:


Second: how will this affect Mocking Jay pt 2?


From what he had left to shoot of part 2 his character could be replaced by another character from the book.

The point is conceded. Will you defer your motion to allow a commission to explore the validity of your accusations?
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Reply #47 posted 02/03/14 9:02am

lazycrockett

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Police found 50 bags containing what is suspected of containing heroin, bottles of prescription pills, and more than 20 used syringes in Philip Seymour Hoffman's apartment


WOW.
The Most Important Thing In Life Is Sincerity....Once You Can Fake That, You Can Fake Anything.
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Reply #48 posted 02/03/14 9:19am

dJJ

lazycrockett said:

Police found 50 bags containing what is suspected of containing heroin, bottles of prescription pills, and more than 20 used syringes in Philip Seymour Hoffman's apartment


WOW.



Horrible.


99% of my posts are ironic. Maybe this post sides with the other 1%.
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Reply #49 posted 02/03/14 12:32pm

JoeBala

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Just Music-No Categories-Enjoy It!
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Reply #50 posted 02/03/14 1:27pm

purplethunder3
121

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Philip Seymour Hoffman, perhaps the most ambitious and widely admired American actor of his generation, who gave three-dimensional nuance to a wide range of sidekicks, villains and leading men on screen and embraced some of the theater’s most burdensome roles on Broadway, died on Sunday at an apartment in Greenwich Village he was renting as an office. He was 46.

The death, from an apparent drug overdose, was confirmed by the police. Mr. Hoffman was found in the apartment by a friend who had become concerned after being unable to reach him. Investigators found a syringe in his arm and, nearby, an envelope containing what appeared to be heroin.

Mr. Hoffman was long known to struggle with addiction. In 2006, he said in an interview with “60 Minutes” that he had given up drugs and alcohol many years earlier, when he was 22. Last year he checked into a rehabilitation program for about 10 days after a reliance on prescription pills resulted in his briefly turning again to heroin.

“I saw him last week, and he was clean and sober, his old self,” said David Bar Katz, a playwright, and the friend who found Mr. Hoffman and called 911. “I really thought this chapter was over.”

PLAY VIDEO
VIDEO|1:51

Philip Seymour Hoffman's Many Roles

A look back at the career of Philip Seymour Hoffman, who was found dead Sunday. He was perhaps the most admired American actor of his generation.

A stocky, often sleepy-looking man with blond, generally uncombed hair who favored the rumpled clothes more associated with an out-of-work actor than a star, Mr. Hoffman did not cut the traditional figure of a leading man, though he was more than capable of leading roles.

In his final appearance on Broadway, in 2012, he put his Everyman mien to work in portraying perhaps the American theater’s most celebrated protagonist — Willy Loman, Arthur Miller’s title character in “Death of a Salesman.” At 44, he was widely seen as young for the part — the casting, by the director Mike Nichols, was meant to emphasize the flashback scenes depicting a younger, pre-disillusionment Willy — and though the production drew mixed reviews, Mr. Hoffman was nominated for a Tony Award.

“Mr. Hoffman does terminal uncertainty better than practically anyone,” Ben Brantley wrote in The New York Times, “and he’s terrific in showing the doubt that crumples Willy just when he’s trying to sell his own brand of all-American optimism.”

In supporting roles, he was nominated three times for Academy Awards — as a priest under suspicion of sexual predation in “Doubt” (2008); as a C.I.A. agent especially eloquent in high dudgeon in “Charlie Wilson’s War” (2007);and as a charismatic cult leader in “The Master” (2012).

But he won in the best actor category for “Capote” (2005). As the eccentrically sociable, brilliantly probing and unflappably gay author of “In Cold Blood,” Mr. Hoffman flawlessly affected the real-life Truman Capote’s distinctly nasal, high-pitched voice and the naturally fey drama of his presence. Writing in The Times, A. O. Scott described the film as being about a writer’s relationship with his work.

“This makes for better drama than you might expect,” Mr. Scott wrote. “Capote’s human connections are, for the most part, secondary and instrumental, which makes Philip Seymour Hoffman’s performance all the more remarkable, since he must connect with the audience without piercing the membrane of his character’s narcissism.

Launch media viewer

Mr. Hoffman as Truman Capote in the 2005 film “Capote,” for which he won the Academy Award for best actor. Attila Dory/Sony Pictures Classics

“Not only does Mr. Hoffman achieve an impressive physical and vocal transformation — mimicking Capote’s chirpy drawl and appearing to shrink to his elfin stature — but he also conveys, with clarity and subtlety, the complexities of Capote’s temperament.”

Mr. Hoffman appeared in more than 50 films in a career that spanned less than 25 years; in the early 1990s he had small roles in “Leap of Faith,” which starred Steve Martin as a faith healer, and “Scent of a Woman,” in which he played a prep school classmate of Chris O’Donnell, the weekend escort of a blind former military officer on a New York City jaunt, played by Al Pacino, who won an Oscar for the role.

He appeared in big-budget Hollywood films — including “Mission: Impossible III” (2006), “Moneyball” (2011) and “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” (2013) — and critically praised independent films, including “The Savages” (2007), in which he and Laura Linney, as his sister, struggle to care for their declining father; “Synecdoche, New York” (2008), Charlie Kaufman’s offbeat drama in which he played a moody theater director wrangling with his work and women; and “A Late Quartet,” about a violinist in the midst of dual crises, familial and musical.

But citing the highlights of Mr. Hoffman’s prolific work life — which included directing and acting in Off Broadway shows for the Labyrinth Theater Company, a New York City troupe, which he served for a time as artistic director — undervalues his versatility and his willingness, rare in a celebrity actor, to explore the depths of not just creepy or villainous characters, but especially unattractive ones. He was a chameleon of especially vivid colors in roles that called for him to be unappealing.

He played an obsequious sycophant in the Coen brothers’s cult comedy “The Big Lebowski” (1998); a former child star pathetically desperate to reclaim his celebrity in “Along Came Polly” (2004), a romantic comedy that starred Ben Stiller and Jennifer Aniston; a chronic masturbator in Todd Solondz’s portrait of suburban New Jersey, “Happiness” (1998); a snooty Princetonian in “The Talented Mr. Ripley” (1999); a weaselly tabloid reporter who gets his comeuppance (he’s glued to a wheelchair and set on fire) in “Red Dragon” (2002), an adaptation of one of Thomas Harris’s Hannibal Lecter novels; and in the role that brought him his first renown, he was Scotty J., a shy, overweight, gay boom operator on a pornographic film in “Boogie Nights” (1997).

In addition to “Death of a Salesman,” Mr. Hoffman appeared as the anguished and violent playwright, Konstantin, in Mr. Nichols’s production of “The Seagull” at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park in 2001, and on Broadway in two other long and difficult roles.

Launch media viewer

Mr. Hoffman with Linda Emond and Andrew Garfield in the 2012 Broadway revival of “Death of a Salesman.” Charles Sykes/Associated Press

In 2000, he and John C. Reilly were in “True West,” Sam Shepard’s harrowing comic drama about the reunion of two estranged brothers; each of the two roles is substantial, but in this production, directed by Mat

thew Warchus, the actors each played them both, switching roles in different performances.

And in 2003, he played James Tyrone, the doomed-to-alcoholism elder son of James and Mary Tyrone (Brian Dennehy and Vanessa Redgrave) in “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” Eugene O’Neill’s portrait of an epic family demise.

“The theater was very difficult for him,” Robert Falls, the director of “Long Day’s Journey,” said in an interview Sunday. “It cost him; there was an emotional cost to the work, having to do it for eight performances a week, and having to rehearse. In ‘Long Day’s Journey,’ a role about an addict who would be dead in a number of years, who was filled with self-loathing, certainly Phil had access to those emotions. But I’m not talking about a method actor. He just brought every fiber of his being to the stage. He was there — with his depth of feeling, depth of humanity — and no other actor I’ve ever worked with ever brought it like that, not at that level.”

Mr. Hoffman was born on July 23, 1967, in Fairport, N.Y., a suburb of Rochester. His mother, the former Marilyn Loucks, is a former family court judge. His father, Gordon, worked for the Xerox Corporation. His parents, who divorced when Philip was young, survive him. In his acceptance speechat the Academy Awards in 2006, Mr. Hoffman thanked many people, but in particular his mother, now known as Marilyn O’Connor, who attended. He thanked her for raising him and his three siblings on her own and for taking him to see his first play.

“Be proud, Mom, ‘cause I’m proud of you, and we’re here tonight, and it’s so good,” he said with a smile.

Mr. Hoffman’s other survivors include a brother, Gordon, a screenwriter who wrote “Love Liza,” a 2002 film starring Mr. Hoffman as a man living through the aftermath of his wife’s suicide; and two sisters, Jill Hoffman DelVecchio and Emily Hoffman Barr; his longtime partner, Mimi O’Donnell, a costume designer who is the current artistic director of the Labyrinth Theater Company; and their three children, Cooper, Tallulah and Willa.

Launch media viewer

Philip Seymour Hoffman on Jan. 19 at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. Victoria Will/Invision, via Associated Press

Mr. Hoffman became an actor in high school after a wrestling injury halted his athletic aspirations. He played Radar in a school production of “MASH,” a performance that was skilled enough that the school’s drama director decided to put on “Death of a Salesman”; in 1984, as a senior, he played Willy Loman. After graduating, he spent a summer at the Circle in the Square Theater School in Manhattan and later graduated from the New York University Tisch School of the Arts.

Mr. Hoffman’s other notable film roles included one of two brothers (Ethan Hawke was the other) who contrive to rob their parents’ jewelry store, a crime that goes grotesquely wrong, in Sidney Lumet’s 2007 thriller “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead”; the renegade rock critic Lester Bangs in Cameron Crowe’s “Almost Famous” (2000); a rogue disc jockey in “Pirate Radio” (2009); and the campaign manager of a politician in “The Ides of March” (2011).

His principal works in progress were “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1” and “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2,” in which he plays the head game-maker Plutarch Heavensbee. He had largely finished on the first film, but was scheduled for seven more shooting days on the second, according to a person who was briefed on the situation and spoke on condition of anonymity because of confidentiality strictures.

The films, directed by Francis Lawrence, are set for release by Lionsgate, the first on Nov. 21 of this year, the second on Nov. 20, 2015.

As a director, Mr. Hoffman worked with Stephen Adly Guirgis, a Labyrinth colleague, on several well-received Off Broadway plays, including “In Arabia We’d All Be Kings,” “Jesus Hopped the A Train,” “Our Lady of 121st Street” and “The Little Flower of East Orange” — all tempestuous works about urban life — and a fantasy biblical discourse, “The Last Days of Judas Iscariot.”

Also for Labyrinth, he played the title role in Robert Glaudini’s “Jack Goes Boating,” about the tentative love life of a pot-smoking limousine driver; Mr. Hoffman reprised the role in a 2010 adaptation, a film he also directed.

771COMMENTS

Labyrinth members were in a state of shock yesterday. “I had no indication at all,” the actor Felix Solis said in an interview. “He was our hero; he was our leader.”

On Sunday afternoon outside the building where Mr. Hoffman died, more than 100 people had gathered to mourn. The body was removed at about 6:40 p.m.; police officers formed a barricade to prevent people from taking pictures.

“He’s a local — he’s a fixture in this neighborhood,” said Christian McCulloch, who said he lived nearby. “You see him with his kids in the coffee shops. He is so sweet. It’s desperately sad.

I guess U know me well, I don't like winter
But I seem 2 get a kick out of doing U cold
Oh, what the hell, U always surrender...
What's this strange relationship that we hold on 2?!!!
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Reply #51 posted 02/03/14 5:43pm

RodeoSchro

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NDRU said:

RodeoSchro said:

Anyone that tries drugs is a moron. No argument, no exceptions.

Thank you, Westboro Baptist Church


You're welcome.

I assume that you've told your kids that doing drugs is NOT moronic?

Second Funkiest White Man in America

Rocket Frog
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Reply #52 posted 02/03/14 10:58pm

JoeBala

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Philip Seymour Hoffman: Lessons and Wisdom from his GQ Profiles

philip-seymour-hoffman-gq-magazine-january-2001-cover-actor.jpeg

Philip Seymour Hoffman died yesterday, at the age of 46. America has been deprived of its greatest living actor. In talking to and writing about an actor who lent such gravitas to even the smallest roles, we here at GQ were never afraid to wax poetic about the man, or glean rolls and rolls of wisdom and portent from his every humble, self-effacing word. And so, here are some choice bits from and about Hoffman over the years that have appeared in the pages of GQ:

On Being "That Guy"
Time and again in the late '90s, we emerged from the Bijou or the Octoplex marveling over yet another terrific performance by that guy, the seemingly ubiquitous character actor with the straw-colored hair, florid complexion, heavy build and wet, crumpled voice.--David Kamp, January 2001

On Fairness
"I've tried to, you know--and I mean this--I try to really respect the people I play. I try to, like, not judge them. I try to give them as much humanity as possible. Even if they're not good people. And hopefully that's working--and I think that is what's working--and people are thankful for that."

On the Quintessential "Hoffman Man"
You could probably sketch the Hoffman Man from memory: usually unshaven, seldom ruggedly so. Thick, unflattering systems-analyst glasses. Jacket sleeves too short, T-shirt riding up. Spends a lot of time getting in and out of dumpy midsize cars. There is an aura to the Hoffman Man of pit stains, of balled-up socks that don't quite make it to the hamper, of meals eaten over the sink with the TV on because the Hoffman Man is often alone, too socially awkward to ask for the love he so clearly needs--the apotheosis being Allen, the ob- scene phone caller in Todd Solondz's Happiness. After you've watched an actor glue postcards to the wall with his own semen, it's hard to look at him any other way.--Alex Pappademas, October 2005

On Bit Roles
"I've had conversations where someone's wanted me to play a role that's actually bigger than the role I'm interested in. [But] to play one leading-man role after another would narrow my options, ultimately. People stop seeing you as both. I just want to make sure that doors don't close, you know what I mean?"

On Aging
"You get into your midthirties," he says, "and before you know it, this thing sneaks up, and you're like, 'Have I done that thing? Have I done that thing I wanted to do? Is this what's gonna be my legacy?' "

On Surprising Everyone--Even the Extras
There is the scene being filmed, in which the crowd's amusement at Capote's transparent and disingenuous bit of self-effacement has been explicitly directed. But in the laughter there's also a spontaneous delight. Imagine more than a hundred movie extras waiting around for hours to react with faked astonishment, only to be visited then and there by the real Godzilla. Hello, my name is Truman Capote. Of course it is.--David Rakoff, December 2005

Just Music-No Categories-Enjoy It!
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Reply #53 posted 02/03/14 11:06pm

NDRU

avatar

RodeoSchro said:

NDRU said:

Thank you, Westboro Baptist Church


You're welcome.

I assume that you've told your kids that doing drugs is NOT moronic?

Doing something moronic doesn't make you a moron. You've never done something regrettable?

But mostly, it's incrediby insensitive to insult someone like that upon their death. You don't know that someone here doesn't know the guy

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Reply #54 posted 02/04/14 1:26am

Mandingo

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At the risk of stating an oxymoron, he was a disturbingly brilliant actor. His performance in the Master was Oscars worthy. R.I.P man. You left the world a better place and went out like a fuckin' rockstar pimp

"...it's better 2 burn out than 2 fade away" neutral

A love Bizarre..
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Reply #55 posted 02/04/14 3:44am

damosuzuki

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NDRU said:

RodeoSchro said:


You're welcome.

I assume that you've told your kids that doing drugs is NOT moronic?

Doing something moronic doesn't make you a moron. You've never done something regrettable?

But mostly, it's incrediby insensitive to insult someone like that upon their death. You don't know that someone here doesn't know the guy

And very insensitive to those who've had people in our lives who've dealt with addiction issues IMO.

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Reply #56 posted 02/04/14 6:54am

Hudson

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http://www.hitfix.com/the...ast-no-218

First 14 minutes discuss what would have been a critically acclaimed Showtime series he was the star of and filmed a pilot, plus his roles and legacy. Interesting listen.

The point is conceded. Will you defer your motion to allow a commission to explore the validity of your accusations?
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Reply #57 posted 02/04/14 8:41am

RodeoSchro

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NDRU said:

RodeoSchro said:


You're welcome.

I assume that you've told your kids that doing drugs is NOT moronic?

Doing something moronic doesn't make you a moron. You've never done something regrettable?

But mostly, it's incrediby insensitive to insult someone like that upon their death. You don't know that someone here doesn't know the guy


Well for anyone that knew the guy, they ought to be mad as hell at him. And they REALLY ought to be mad as hell at whoever introduced him to drugs, whoever sold him drugs, and whoever did drugs with him.

His death was not just tragic - it was senseless and above all, stupid.

Why are people not outraged that such a talented, loving family man was stolen by heroin? By drug culture? By drug dealers?

Don't you understand exactly what killed this man?

Do you REALLY want to honor Hoffman? Tell every single person you can - especially young people - that drugs are a dead-end. And emphasis on the "dead". You'll need nothing more than the title of this thread to make your point.

Second Funkiest White Man in America

Rocket Frog
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Reply #58 posted 02/04/14 8:42am

RodeoSchro

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I'll tell you something else - I have DAMN SURE told my kids and every other young person I've had the good fortune to mentor or influence that drugs will kill you, and doing them is stupid and wrong.

If you've told your kid anything other than that, you've made a mistake.

Second Funkiest White Man in America

Rocket Frog
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Reply #59 posted 02/04/14 2:06pm

Timmy84

I understand the "tough love" but sometimes that makes it even harder for a person to wanna get help for their problems. I'm thinking Hoffman was a "functional junkie" up until the day he died. Yes it was foolish but lots of folks don't read the warning signs (and sometimes don't want to). Once you do get off drugs, you're not exactly clean, you're still an addict and you go through withdrawals until you have a base that can help you from what it is that can be a potential life killer. It's too easy to say "look, don't do this or it'll kill you" but what many don't get is that drugs produce a chemical imbalance in the body. Once someone becomes tolerable to a drug, they would fight you to get it. That's how their brains are programmed. From what I'm reading, Hoffman carried all the classic signs of a drug addict.

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Forums > General Discussion > RIP phillip seymour hoffman